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11, 23, and 3 dogs, respectively. Feeding tubes were placed in 7 dogs (3 esophagostomy tubes and 4 gastrostomy tubes). Surgery time was recorded in 66 dogs, and the median surgery time was 45 minutes (range, 4 to 140 minutes). The median surgery time

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

. Another dog (dog 1) had an esophagostomy tube and closed-suction drain placed at the conclusion of surgery, both of which were removed within a 24-hour period because the dog regained an apparently normal appetite and there was no discharge via the drain

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

presented in Table 1 . Esophagostomy tubes were placed in 3 cats. Jackson-Pratt closed suction drains were placed in the abdominal cavity of 2 cats and remained in place for 5 and 7 days. All cats had intraoperative abdominal cultures performed, with no

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

-loop nephrostomy catheter h was placed. All laparotomy incisions were routinely closed in 3 layers. A urethral catheter s with a closed urinary collection system was placed in patients where monitoring urine output was considered desirable. An esophagostomy tube

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

had an end-stage kidney, and 1 cat had end-stage pyelonephritis. Postoperative management —Standard postoperative management 15 was implemented in all 19 cats. A gastrostomy tube (n = 10 cats) or a left-sided esophagostomy tube g (7) was placed at

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

ureteral obstruction (33). Concurrent surgical procedures performed at the time of ureteral intervention included cystotomy (n = 76), esophagostomy and feeding tube placement (17), nephrostomy tube placement (5), perineal urethrostomy (3), gastrointestinal

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

catheter placed in a jugular vein. The initial wound evaluation and debridement were performed while the dog was anesthetized, and an esophagostomy tube was placed for nutritional support. Wound care was divided into 2 phases, namely debridement and

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

through an esophagostomy tube. Three of the 14 cats with dietary information received injectable cobalamin supplementation. No cats received long-term supplementation with taurine or any other dietary supplements. Outcome and owner perception of

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

cut to sizes larger than the width of the defect. Other adaptations are feeding in an elevated position of the head and use of rabbit water bottles. Rarely, the patient will need an esophagostomy tube pre- or postoperatively. Preparation for

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

which an incision was created but not primarily repaired (eg, for placement of esophagostomy feeding tubes) were excluded from the study. Patients that were euthanized or died intraoperatively were excluded, as were those with incomplete or missing

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association