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bupivacaine and morphine on healthy cultured equine chondrocytes in vitro. The null hypothesis was that buprenorphine is devoid of any toxic effects on cultured equine chondrocytes independent of the concentration administered or duration of exposure

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

determined on the basis of published regional techniques that involved the use of 0.5% bupivacaine. 16 The stained and contralateral unstained pterygopalatine fossa were carefully dissected, and tissues were evaluated to detect trauma to the nerves or

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

interrupted suture was placed through the skin to close the stab incision. Figure 1— Photographic sequence of catheter placement for bupivacaine delivery to the medial and lateral palmar nerves. Through a vertical stab incision the introducer needle for

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

in other species. 5 The magnitude and duration of either complication might be reduced by decreasing the concentration of local anesthetic included in the epidural injection. 6 EA with low-dose local anesthetics (eg, bupivacaine or ropivacaine < 0

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

resistance technique. 22 The local anesthetic solution was administered in a volume of 0.2 mL/kg (0.09 mL/lb), 21 but not to exceed 6 mL total, and contained a combination of 1.0% lidocaine and 0.25% bupivacaine. This combination of lidocaine (2 mg/kg) and

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

lumbosacral space was clipped and cleansed with a betadine scrub. Preservative-free morphine j (0.1 mg/kg [0.045 mg/lb]) and bupivacaine k (0.5 mg/kg [0.23 mg/lb]) were diluted to a total volume < 0.2 mL/kg (0.09 mL/lb) with sterile water. The medications

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the analgesic effects of topical administration of bupivacaine, IM administration of butorphanol, and transdermal administration of fentanyl in cats undergoing onychectomy.

Design—Prospective study.

Animals—27 healthy adult cats.

Procedure—Cats were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 treatment groups, and unilateral (left forefoot) onychectomy was performed. Gait analysis was performed before and 1, 2, 3, and 12 days after surgery. All forces were expressed as a percentage of the cat's body weight.

Results—On day 2, peak vertical force (PVF) was significantly decreased in cats treated with bupivacaine, compared with cats treated with butorphanol or fentanyl. The ratio of left forelimb PVF to PVF of the other 3 limbs was significantly lower on day 2 in cats treated with bupivacaine than in cats treated with fentanyl. No significant differences in vertical impulse (VI) were found between groups on any day. Values for PVF, VI, and the PVF ratio increased progressively following surgery. However, for all 3 groups, values were still significantly decreased, compared with baseline values, 12 days after surgery.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that limb function following onychectomy is significantly better in cats treated with fentanyl transdermally or butorphanol IM than in cats treated with bupivacaine topically. Regardless of the analgesic regimen, limb function was still significantly reduced 12 days after surgery, suggesting that long-term analgesic treatment should be considered for cats undergoing onychectomy. Irrigation of the surgical incisions with bupivacaine prior to wound closure cannot be recommended as the sole method for providing postoperative analgesia in cats undergoing onychectomy. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2005;227:89–93)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

surgery, the dog received an epidural injection of 0.5% bupivacaine solution (1 mg/kg [0.45 mg/lb]) into the lumbosacral space. Surgical fixation of the fracture was achieved without complications, and a low delivered fraction of isoflurane (between 0

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

could rescue dogs from bupivacaine-induced cardiac arrest. After induction of cardiac arrest with bupivacaine (10 mg/kg, IV), basic life support was initiated and dogs were treated with equal volumes of either saline (0.9% NaCl) solution or ILE. All of

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Practice See page 41 ECG of the Month See page 45 Animal Behavior Case of the Month See page 49 Pathology in Practice See page 53 Lidocaine-bupivacaine–infused absorbable gelatin hemostatic sponges versus

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association