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Abstract

Objective—To determine the effects of treatment with and without adjuvant radiation therapy on recurrence of ocular and adnexal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) at specific anatomic locations in horses.

Design—Retrospective study.

Animals—91 horses.

Procedures—Medical records of horses with histologically confirmed ocular and adnexal SCC evaluated from 1985 to 2002 were reviewed. Sex, breed, age, type of treatment, location, and recurrence of SCC were recorded. Two treatment groups determined by recurrence of SCCs treated with and without adjuvant radiation therapy were established.

Results—The anatomic site with the highest recurrence rate was the limbus (junction of the cornea and sclera) or bulbar conjunctiva (47.7%), independent of treatment group. There was a significant difference in recurrence rates of ocular and adnexal SCCs between the 2 treatment groups, independent of anatomic location. Recurrence rates of SCCs treated with and without adjuvant radiation therapy were 11.9% and 44.1%, respectively. Recurrence rates for SCCs of the eyelid, limbus or bulbar conjunctiva, and cornea treated with adjuvant radiation therapy were significantly different from those for SCCs treated without adjuvant radiation therapy. The most frequently represented anatomic site for ocular and adnexal SCCs was the eyelid (28.7%). Coat color, breed, and the interaction of age and breed had a significant effect on tumor recurrence regardless of treatment type and anatomic location.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results indicated that ocular and adnexal SCCs treated with adjuvant radiation therapy had a significantly lower recurrence rate, compared with SCCs treated without adjuvant radiation therapy, independent of anatomic location. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2004;225:1733–1738)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine clinical response and toxic effects of cis-bis-neodecanoato-trans-R,R-1,2- diaminocyclohexane platinum (II) (L-NDDP) administered IV at escalating doses to cats with oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC).

Animals—18 cats with oral SCC.

Procedure—Cats that failed to respond to conventional treatment or had nonresectable tumors were included. Data included a CBC, serum biochemical analyses, urinalysis, cytologic examination of a fineneedle aspirate of enlarged lymph nodes, and thoracic and oral radiographs for clinical staging. A starting dose (75 to 100 mg/m2 of L-NDDP) was administered IV. At 21-day intervals, subsequent doses increased by the rate of 5 or 10 mg/m2. Response was evaluated every 21 days by tumor measurement and thoracic radiography. Quality of life was assessed by owners, using a performance status questionnaire.

Results—On average, cats received 2 treatments. Toxicoses included an intermittent, acute anaphylactoid- parasympathomimetic reaction, lethargy or sedation (≤ 24 hours), inappetence or signs of depression (≤ 72 hours), mild to moderate increase in hepatic enzyme activity, and melena. Pulmonary, renal, or hematopoietic abnormalities were not evident. Performance status surveys indicated normal behavior and grooming or decreased activity and self-care (19/20 assessments), ate well with or without assistance (15/20), and did not lose weight (15/20). Median survival time was 59.8 days (mean, 54.1 days).

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—L-NDDP was ineffective for treatment of cats with oral SCC. None of the cats had a complete or partial remission. Acute toxicoses and poor therapeutic response limit therapeutic usefulness of L-NDDP in cats, unless dosage, frequency, and administration procedures can be improved. (Am J Vet Res 2000;61: 791–795)

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

and Case Summary Morphologic diagnoses and case summary: gastric squamous cell carcinoma with metastasis to the liver and lung, and carcinomatosis in a gelding. Comments Gastric neoplasia is rare in horses, accounting for 1.5% of all equine

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

size with a roughened appearance; on cut section the bulla was completely filled by a cream-colored material of a granular to creamy consistency. Histopathology was consistent with right middle ear squamous cell carcinoma and severe tympanic bone

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association