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Abstract

Objective—To determine effects of time of administration of tilmicosin and feeding of chlortetracycline on colonization of the nasopharynx of transported cattle by Mannheimia haemolytica (MH).

Animals—454 steers (body weight, 200 kg).

Procedure—3 studies included 4 truckloads of steers assembled and processed in the southeastern United States. For each truckload of steers, a third received tilmicosin before transportation (PRIOR), then all were transported to a feedlot in New Mexico (23 hours). At arrival (day 0), another third received tilmicosin (ARR). The remaining third did not receive tilmicosin (control steers [CTR]). Steers in studies 1 and 2 were housed in a feedlot, and steers in study 3 were housed on wheat pasture. One half of the steers from each group in studies 2 and 3 were fed chlortetracycline on days 5 to 9. Steer with signs of respiratory tract disease were treated. Nasal swab specimens were examined for MH to determine colonization.

Results—PRIOR and ARR steers had a lower incidence of respiratory tract disease and MH colonization than CTR steers, but PRIOR and ARR steers did not differ. Feeding chlortetracycline did not have an effect.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Tilmicosin can inhibit MH from colonizing the nasopharynx of cattle. Because tilmicosin inhibits the growth of MH in the respiratory tract, medication with tilmicosin prior to transport should reduce the incidence of acute respiratory tract disease during the first week at the feedlot when calves are most susceptible to infectious organisms. (Am J Vet Res 2000;61: 1479–1483)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine the association between respiratory tract infection with bovine coronavirus (BCV), treatment for respiratory tract disease, pulmonary lesions at slaughter, and average daily gain in cattle in feedlots.

Animals—837 calves in feedlots in Ohio and Texas.

Procedure—Nasal swab specimens were obtained from cattle at arrival in a feedlot (day 0) and at various times during the initial 28 days after arrival. Specimens were tested for BCV, using an antigencapture ELISA. Serum samples were obtained at arrival and again 28 days after arrival and tested for antibodies to BCV, using an antibody-detection ELISA. Information was collected regarding treatment for cattle with respiratory tract disease and average daily gain during the feeding period. Pulmonary lesions were evaluated at slaughter.

Results—Cattle shedding BCV from the nasal cavity and developing an antibody response against BCV were 1.6 times more likely to require treatment for respiratory tract disease than cattle that did not shed the virus or develop an immune response against BCV. Additionally, cattle that shed BCV from the nasal cavity were 2.2 times more likely to have pulmonary lesions at slaughter than cattle that did not shed the virus. The BCV shedding or seroconversion status did not affect average daily gain.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Bovine coronavirus infects feedlot cattle and is associated with an increased risk for cattle developing respiratory tract disease and pulmonary lesions. Development of appropriate control measures could help reduce the incidence of respiratory tract disease. (Am J Vet Res 2000;61:1062–1066)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

SUMMARY

The immunotherapeutic effect of low-dose human alpha interferon on viral shedding and clinical disease was evaluated in horses inoculated with equine herpesvirus- 1 (ehv-1). Eighteen clinically healthy weanling horses, 5 to 7 months old, were allotted to 3 equal groups. Two groups were treated orally with human α-2a interferon (0.22 or 2.2 U/kg of body weight), on days 2 and 1 before inoculation with ehv-1, the day of inoculation, and again on postinoculation day 1. The horses of the remaining group were given a placebo orally on the same days. The horses were monitored daily for changes in body temperature and for clinical signs of respiratory tract disease. Blood and nasal swab specimens were collected daily for virus isolation. Blood was also collected at intervals throughout the monitoring period for evaluation of cbc, serum IgG and IgM concentrations, and antibody titers to ehv-1. Febrile responses, nasal discharge, viral shedding, changes in cbc, and an increase in antibody titers to ehv-1 were noticed in all horses after inoculation. There was no significant difference (P > 0.05) in mean values of the factors measured between treatment and control groups.

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To measure antibody titers against bovine coronavirus (BCV), determine frequency of BCV in nasal swab specimens, and compare calves treated for bovine respiratory tract disease (BRD) between those given an intranasally administered vaccine and control calves.

Design—Randomized clinical trial.

Animals—414 heifer calves.

Procedure—Intranasal BCV antigen concentration and antibody titer against BCV were measured on entry to a feedlot. Calves were randomly assigned to receive 3.0 mL of a modified-live virus vaccine against bovine enteric coronavirus and rotavirus or 3.0 mL of saline (0.9% NaCl) solution. Calves were confined to 1 of 2 pens, depending on vaccination status, for a minimum of 17 days of observation (range, 17 to 99). Selection of calves for treatment of BRD and scoring for severity of disease were done by veterinarians unaware of treatment status.

Results—Intranasal BCV (125/407 [31%]) and serum antibody titers ≥ 20 against BCV (246/396 [62%]) were identified in calves entering the feedlot. Vaccination was associated with significant decrease in risk of treatment for BRD; intranasal BCV on entry to the feedlot was associated with increased risk of treatment. Univariate analysis revealed that control calves with intranasal BRD on entry to the feedlot and those with antibody titer < 20 were significantly more likely to be treated for BRD.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—These data provide further evidence of an association between BCV and respiratory tract disease in feedlot calves. An intranasally administered vaccine appeared to reduce risk of treatment for BRD. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2004;225:726–731)

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To express a cecropin B transgene on bovine nasal mucosa and determine the effect on Mannheimia haemolytica serotype 1 (S1) colonization.

Animals—27 crossbred beef calves.

Procedure—The antibacterial efficacy of cecropin B against M haemolytica S1 was first determined by measuring its minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC). The peptide was also diluted in pooled bovine nasal secretions, and its antibacterial activity was evaluated. The nasal passages of 16 calves were aerosolized with 25, 50, or 100 µg of plasmid DNA/nostril, whereas 11 control calves were aerosolized with only the transfection reagent. In 2 of the experiments, 12 treated and 8 control calves were exposed intranasally with an aerosol of M haemolytica S1. Nasal swab specimens and secretions were collected and analyzed by use of polymerase chain reaction (PCR), real-time PCR, real-time reverse-transcriptase PCR, ELISA, and bacterial culture.

Results—In vitro, cecropin B inhibited M haemolytica S1 at an MIC of 2 µg/mL and its antibacterial activity was not affected by proteolytic activity in nasal secretions. Cecropin B transgene expression was detected in calves transfected with 50 or 100 µg of DNA/nostril. Antibacterial activity against M haemolytica S1 was observed in all calves transfected with 100 µg of DNA/nostril but in only 2 of the 4 calves transfected with 50 µg of DNA/nostril.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—In vitro, cecropin B has an effective antibacterial activity against M haemolytica S1 and can prevent colonization of the nasal mucosa after transfection of a vector expressing cecropin B in vivo. (Am J Vet Res 2005;66:1922–1930)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine whether Mycobacterium bovis can be transmitted from experimentally infected deer to uninfected in-contact deer.

Animals—Twenty-three 6-month-old white-tailed deer.

Procedure—On day 0, M bovis (2 × 108 colony-forming units) was administered by intratonsillar instillation to 8 deer; 3 control deer received saline (0.9% NaCl) solution. Eight in-contact deer were comingled with inoculated deer from day 21. On day 120, inoculated deer were euthanatized and necropsied. On day 180, 4 in-contact deer were euthanatized, and 4 new incontact deer were introduced. On day 360, all in-contact deer were euthanatized. Rectal, oral, and nasal swab specimens and samples of hay, pelleted feed, water, and feces were collected for bacteriologic culture. Tissue specimens were also collected at necropsy for bacteriologic culture and histologic analysis.

Results—On day 90, inoculated and in-contact deer developed delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) reactions to purified protein derivative of M bovis. Similarly, new in-contact deer developed DTH reactions by 100 days of contact with original in-contact deer. Tuberculous lesions in in-contact deer were most commonly detected in lungs and tracheobronchial and medial retropharyngeal lymph nodes. Mycobacterium bovis was isolated from nasal secretions and saliva from inoculated and in-contact deer, urine and feces from in-contact deer, and hay and pelleted feed.

Conclusions and Clinical RelevanceMycobacterium bovis is efficiently transmitted from experimentally infected deer to uninfected in-contact deer through nasal secretions, saliva, or contaminated feed. Wildlife management practices that result in unnatural gatherings of deer may enhance both direct and indirect transmission of M bovis. (Am J Vet Res 2001;62:692–696)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To examine the role of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) biotype on the establishment of fetal infection in cattle.

Animals—30 mixed-breed pregnant cows.

Procedure—Pregnant cows were inoculated oronasally with either i-VVNADL, originating from an infectious BVDV cDNA clone of the National Animal Disease Laboratory (NADL) isolate, or the parental virus stock, termed NADL-A.

Results—All cows developed neutralizing antibodies to BVDV, and virus was commonly isolated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells or nasal swab specimens of NADL-A inoculated cows; however, virus was rarely isolated from specimens of i-VVNADL inoculated cows. i-VVNADL did not cause fetal infection, whereas all fetuses harvested from NADL-A inoculated cows at 6 weeks after inoculation had evidence of infection. Immunoblot analysis of fetal virus isolates revealed the absence of NS3, confirming a noncytopathic (NCP) biotype BVDV in the NADL-A stock. The sequence of the NCP contaminant (termed NADL-1102) and the i-VVNADL genome were virtually identical, with the exception of a 270 nucleotide-long insert in the i-VVNADL genome. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that NADL-1102 forms a monophyletic group with 6 other NADL genomes.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—These data suggest that the contaminating NCP virus in the NADL-A stock was the ancestral NADL virus, which originally infected a bovine fetus and recombined to produce a cytopathic (CP) variant. Following oronasal infection of pregnant cows, viremia and transplacental transmission of CP BVDV to the fetus is rare, compared with the high occurrence of maternal viremia and fetal infection observed with NCP BVDV. (Am J Vet Res 2002;63:1455–1463)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To describe patterns of seroconversion to bovine coronavirus (BCV) and shedding of BCV from the respiratory tract in feedlot cattle.

Animals—1,074 calves in feedlots in Ohio, Texas, and Nebraska.

Procedure—Nasal swab specimens were obtained at time of arrival (day 0) and at various times during the initial 28 days after arrival at feedlots. Specimens were tested for BCV, using an antigen-capture ELISA. Serum samples were obtained at time of arrival and again 28 days after arrival; sera were analyzed for antibodies to BCV, using an antibody-detection ELISA.

Results—Samples from 12 groups of cattle entering 7 feedlots during a 3-year period revealed that 78 of 1,074 (7.3%) cattle were shedding BCV (range, 0 to 35.9% within specific groups). At time of arrival, 508 of 814 (62.4%) cattle had low (< 50) or undetectable BCV antibody titers. Seroconversion to BCV during the initial 28 days after arrival was detected in 473 of 814 (58%) cattle tested (range, 20.3 to 84.1% within specific groups). In cattle shedding BCV from the nasal passages, 49 of 68 (72.1%) seroconverted, and 472 of 746 (63.3%) cattle that were not shedding the virus seroconverted.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Bovine coronavirus can be detected in populations of feedlot cattle in the form of viral shedding as well as seroconversion to the virus. Although only a few cattle were shedding the virus at the time of arrival at a feedlot, most of the cattle seroconverted to BCV by 28 days after arrival. (Am J Vet Res 2000;61:1057–1061)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To assess fecal and nasal shedding patterns of bovine torovirus (BoTV) in cattle at time of arrival and periodically throughout the first 21 days after arrival at a feedlot.

Animals—57 steers.

Procedure—Fecal and nasal-swab samples collected on days 0, 4, 14, and 21 after arrival were tested for BoTV, using ELISA. A subset of samples from calves testing positive and negative for BoTV was analyzed, using reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Paired serum samples were collected on days 0 and 21 and tested for BoTV antibodies, using a hemagglutination inhibition assay.

Results—Overall rate of fecal shedding of BoTV was 21 of 57 (37%) by ELISA and 40 of 42 (95%) by RT-PCR with peak shedding on day 4. Diarrhea was more common in calves shedding BoTV than those not shedding the virus (odds ratio, 1.72). Overall rate of nasal shedding of BoTV was 15 of 57 (26%) by ELISA and 42 of 42 (100%) by RT-PCR, with peak shedding on day 0. Specificity of the RT-PCR product was confirmed by sequence analysis. Approximately 93% of the calves seroconverted to BoTV (> 4-fold increase in titer). Differences were not detected between calves shedding BoTV and nonshedders in relation to disease and treatments, perhaps because of the low number of cattle in the study.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—This study confirmed BoTV infections in feedlot cattle, including BoTV antigen and viral RNA in nasal secretions, and the shedding pattern during the first 21 days after arrival in a feedlot. (Am J Vet Res 2002;63:342–348).

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine whether a single intranasal dose of modified-live bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) vaccine protects calves from BRSV challenge and characterize cell-mediated immune response in calves following BRSV challenge.

Animals—13 conventionally reared 4- to 6-week-old Holstein calves.

Procedure—Calves received intranasal vaccination with modified live BRSV vaccine (VC-group calves; n = 4) or mock vaccine (MC-group calves; 6) 1 month before BRSV challenge; unvaccinated control-group calves (n = 3) underwent mock challenge. Serum virus neutralizing (VN) antibodies were measured on days –30, -14, 0, and 7 relative to BRSV challenge; nasal swab specimens were collected for virus isolation on days 0 to 7. At necropsy examination on day 7, tissue specimens were collected for measurement of BRSV-specific interferon gamma (IFN-γ) production. Tissue distribution of CD3+ T and BLA.36+ B cells was evaluated by use of immunohistochemistry.

Results—The MC-group calves had significantly higher rectal temperatures, respiratory rates, and clinical scores on days 5 to 7 after BRSV challenge than VCgroup calves. No difference was seen between distributions of BRSV in lung tissue of VC- and MC-group calves. Production of BRSV-specific IFN-γ was increased in tissue specimens from VC-group calves, compared with MC- and control-group calves. Virusspecific IFN-γ production was highest in the mediastinal lymph node of VC-group calves. Increased numbers of T cells were found in expanded bronchialassociated lymphoid tissue and airway epithelium of VC-group calves.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—An intranasal dose of modified-live BRSV vaccine can protect calves against virulent BRSV challenge 1 month later. ( Am J Vet Res 2004;65:363–372)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research