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as the bulbosus buttercup species, Ranunculus bulbosus L; plant identification was later confirmed by an investigator from the University of Kentucky College of Agriculture, Food and Environment. The spring months had been unseasonably cool and wet

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Each year, an estimated 8 to 10 million animals are housed in animal shelters, veterinary clinics, and boarding facilities. 1 The proximity of animals to each other in dense animal housing environments increases the likelihood of exposure to

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

day. Pens were routinely scraped clean and bedded with sawdust. Frequency for cleaning and bedding was dependent on weather and amount of animal excretions. The intent was to maintain the environment so that steers remained clean and healthy

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

through September and then decrease at the end of October. 1 In that time, the number and severity of documented injuries and falls increase (Freeman, PhD, Disney’s Animals, Science and Environment, Bay Lake, FL, unpublished data, 2015). Fecal and urine T

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

rates in canine and feline cardiac patients with subclinical disease in their home environment to help determine the onset of L-CHF or to monitor effectiveness of treatment. Anecdotally, veterinary cardiologists have suggested that an SRR < 30 breaths

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

associated with in vitro and preclinical rodent studies. 10 , 11 Dogs often occupy the same environment as people do and are often inadvertently exposed to the same carcinogens. Interestingly, dogs can develop spontaneous tumors with histopathologic

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

estrogen have been linked to endometrial hyperplasia, 8,9 so it is hypothesized that the prolonged estrogen-dominant environment in non-breeding females may have adverse effects on reproductive physiology. Indeed, in teleosts, reproductive impairment can

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

were in their natural environment (where they presumably would have less stress than in the unfamiliar hospital environment) and owners were familiar with their dog and sensitive to changes in their behavior. The disadvantage of having owners perform

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association