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, there was a moderate amount of effusion within the right antebrachiocarpal joint. Lameness examination revealed a grade 3 of 5 right forelimb lameness; upper limb flexion exacerbated the lameness. Standard and nonstandard radiographs of the right carpus

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

structures appeared normal on 3-view thoracic radiography, but there was evidence of peritoneal effusion. Abdominal ultrasonography was performed for further evaluation of signs of abdominal pain, the palpated mass in the cranial portion of the abdomen, and

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

as pleural effusion or pleural mass, a more likely cause, although a pulmonary lesion cannot be excluded. Thoracic ultrasonography was performed, which revealed a mild to moderate amount of anechoic pleural effusion and a 3.5-cm rounded

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

a diffuse bronchial pattern and likely bronchiectasis. In both thoracic radiographic views, evidence of mild bilateral retraction of the lungs from the costal wall with a fluid opacity in the pleural space was noted, consistent with pleural effusion

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

sonography for trauma (AFAST and TFAST) and thoracic and abdominal radiography. A scant amount of pleural effusion was detected on ultrasonographic images (not shown). At the time of emergency admission to the university, physical examination findings were

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

valvular annulus. No thrombus was observable in the left atrium. Mild pleural effusion was evident. Figure 2— Same echocardiographic images as in Figure 1 . A—Notice the hyperechoic intimal dissection (arrowheads) within the aorta separating the true

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

tissue opacity (dagger; A) is evident dorsal to the carina, consistent with loculated pleural effusion or a second esophageal foreign body. The heart is elevated from the sternum, with no visible pulmonary vasculature between the heart and sternum (double

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

increase in wispy soft tissue striations, causing a decrease in the retroperitoneal detail, compatible with effusion ( Figure 2 ) . Based on the location, origin of the mass effect, and radiographic appearance of the mass, differential diagnosis for this

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

small intestine is predominantly fluid filled. Wispy soft tissue opacities are noted throughout the mid and midcranial aspects of the abdomen, supporting potential scant peritoneal effusion. Abdominal ultrasonography was performed. Within the

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

serosal margin detail, consistent with abdominal effusion, steatitis, or peritonitis ( Figure 2 ), is evident. The small intestines are diffusely dilated with gas, and the stomach is distended with a mixture of soft tissue or fluid opacity and gas. The

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association