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subsequent thrombosis, aneurysm, and hemorrhage. The variable distribution and chronicity of the arteritis in the rat were also classic features of polyarteritis nodosa. 3,5 To our knowledge, polyarteritis nodosa in a pet (nonlaboratory) rat has not been

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

these lesions, similar to the distension in an arterial aneurysm secondary to weakened vessel walls. 4 , 5 They can arise as primary lesions, or secondary to osteoblastomas, fibrous dysplasia, giant cell tumors, eosinophilic granulomas, and other benign

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

. Discussion The authors believe that this is the first report of vascular ectasia of the vagina in a dog. Similar lesions in the vagina and uterus of horses as a cause of vaginal hemorrhage 1,2 and in the endometrium of rabbits (endometrial venous aneurysms

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Shindo S Kobayashi M Kaga S , et al . Retrocaval ureter and preaortic iliac venous confluence in a patient with an abdominal aortic aneurysm . Surg Radiol Anat 1999 ; 21 : 147 – 149 . 5 Ishitoya S

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

variety of causes, including physical trauma to the thorax, excessive pulling on a dog's collar, rupture of dissecting aortic aneurysms, underlying neoplasia such as thymic lymphoma or thymoma, and ingestion of anticoagulant rodenticides. 3

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

, aneurysms, and vascular malformation. 12,17 Although CNS hemorrhage is not unexpected in the context of a coagulopathy such as thrombocytopenia, this is to the authors’ knowledge the first report of a dog with progressive myelopathy secondary to

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

ventricular systolic function, and moderate tricuspid valve regurgitation. Moreover, a dyskinetic right ventricular outflow tract with evidence of segmental aneurysm was identified. During echocardiographic examination, rhythm abnormalities occurred; therefore

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

; abscess; granuloma; hematoma; and pulmonary arterial aneurysm or dilatation (heartworm or congenital left-to-right shunt). As a result of further investigation, a diagnosis of carotid and aortic body carcinomas was made. The carotid and aortic bodies are

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

predispose dogs to ATE. 5,6 In the veterinary medical literature, there is 1 report 7 of a dog with dilated cardiomyopathy and a subclavian artery thrombus and aneurysm. In the case described in the present report, the ATE was not a tumor embolus, but

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

on a valve or supporting structures in the path of regurgitant jets), 5 minor criteria (predisposition, fever, vascular event [eg, arterial emboli, pulmonary infarcts, mycotic aneurysms, intracranial hemorrhage, conjunctival hemorrhage], immunologic

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association