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curriculum prepared them for diagnosis and treatment of behavior problems after graduation, 14 indicating that some curricula may lack sufficient depth or rigor. These results suggest that veterinary students graduate with a wide range of educational

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Because of increasing numbers of students, expanding curricula, and limited time and financial resources, medical educators are compelled to develop innovative teaching methods for surgical skills instruction. Although there is a need for surgical

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Since the late 1980s and early 1990s, surgical training for veterinary medical students has been skills-oriented, focusing on the acquisition of fundamental surgical skills that are applicable to a wide variety of surgical procedures, including an

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

S tressful learning environments are inevitable in the health professions and impacts on student mental health can be significant. 1 This impact has been reported at multiple levels in the workplace and has been shown to influence a professional

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

depression also have been reported in Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (DVM) students. 14 – 16 Early mental health interventions are important for addressing mental health risk factors. 17 Therefore, to counteract the negative mental health outcomes observed

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

in veterinary contexts, examine the validity of this measure, and present preliminary evidence of the influence these psychological facets and other demonstrative behaviors exert on the manifestation of trust between veterinary students and

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

More than 15 years ago, Kogan and McConnell 1 suggested that veterinary students, like medical students, should be provided psychological services, primarily because the level of stress and the workload associated with the veterinary curriculum

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

training in these procedures into their curricula. However, fiscal constraints, time limitations, ethical and legal considerations associated with using patients for student training, and difficulties associated with acquiring and storing cadavers have

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

an intravenous catheter (IVC) in a horse a “day-one skill” for graduating veterinary students and a skill that new graduates should be highly proficient in performing. 1 , 2 In teaching hospitals, clients, faculty, or technical staff may be reluctant

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

skills training in the vertical plane would have similar performance scores for tasks performed in the horizontal and vertical planes. Materials and Methods Study participants First- and second-year veterinary students at the Washington State

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association