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). ROI Representative SUV Volumetric SUV Myocardium (transverse plane) 2.4 ± 0.3 2.1 ± 0.5 Myocardium (sagittal plane) 1.9 ± 0.4 2.0 ± 0.5 Liver 1.7 ± 0.1 1.7 ± 0.1 Spleen 1.4 ± 0.1 1.3 ± 0

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

scan; 1, only incidental lesions present; 2, only thoracic disease present; 3, abdominal disease present but not affecting the organs of interest (liver, spleen, left kidney, or pancreas); 4, any vascular abnormalities present; or 5, any pathology

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

to the level of the adjacent vertebrae to evaluate liver location, with the vertebral body divided into 3 parts (cranial, middle, and caudal). Changes of the spleen and stomach on the basis of body position were evaluated by use of the dorsal plane

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

immediately following euthanasia. Samples of skeletal muscle (epaxial muscles), cardiac muscle (combined atria and ventricle), lung, liver, gallbladder (emptied of bile), pancreas, spleen, kidneys, and testicle were collected. Gross connective tissues and

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

anecdotally been associated with malignancy in dogs with nontraumatic hemoabdomen; however, rigorous evidence-based findings to support this association have not been published. Ultrasonography of the spleen has been recommended for disease localization, to

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Introduction Nontraumatic hemoabdomen is a common finding in dogs presented to emergency departments for evaluation, and it most commonly results from a ruptured intra-abdominal mass originating in the spleen. 1 Surgical exploration for

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

. Samples of eyelids, genital skin (if edematous), liver, kidneys, spleen, stomach, duodenum, ileum, cecal appendix, colon, reproductive organs (if present), heart, lungs, lymph nodes, and brain were collected from most rabbits; brain tissue was not

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

not reported separately from the overall study population. 14 Several theories have been proposed for why previous splenectomy may increase the risk for GDV. First, the anatomic void created after removal of the spleen, particularly if enlarged, may

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

, pancreas, small intestines, large intestines, ovaries, oviducts, testes, epididymides, vasa deferentia, bladder, fat body, or kidneys. 4 For visual examination of the heart, stomach, and spleen, a left lateral approach is preferred, whereas the right

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

region of the whirl. The spleen was moderately to severely enlarged, 4 had increased contrast enhancement in a speckled pattern, and was abnormally located in the right dorsal abdomen ( Figure 3 ). The small and large intestinal segments were diffusely

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association