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History A 6-month-old 1.5-kg intact male domestic shorthair cat was presented to the emergency service with a 4-month history of nasal and ocular discharge, stertor, dyspnea, open-mouth breathing, seizures, and a mass in the cervical region

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

have been reported involving the distal aspect of the radius (seemingly most common), 2–5 tibia, 6 calcaneus, 7,8 or nasal bone. 9 To our knowledge, osteochondroma has not previously been described in the distal aspect of the third metacarpal bone

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

accounts for 5% to 10% of canine primary bone tumors, 1,2 making it the second most common primary bone tumor in dogs. Osteosarcoma is the most common. 3 Although chondrosarcomas are most commonly located in the nasal cavity of dogs, they have been

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

, cranial vault, or nasal sinuses. 4 Osteomas are seen in all domestic species but are most commonly found in horses and cattle. 5 Often, these osteomas have slow progressive growth over several months and then can become quiescent for months to years. 5

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

consistent with an upper airway irritant. However, this cat did not have typical upper airway disease signs such as sneezing, nasal discharge, respiratory difficulties, stridor or stertorous breathing, or decreased appetite. 2 Based on the worsening cough

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

History A 3-year-old sexually intact male Dutch rabbit was evaluated for nasal discharge and head tilt of 1 week's duration. The rabbit had been laterally recumbent for the 5 hours prior to admission. Upon physical examination, there was

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

), a heart rate of 110 beats/min, and a respiratory rate of 80 beats/min. No murmurs or arrhythmias were detected on thoracic auscultation, and bilateral diffuse wheezes were heard over the lung fields. No nasal discharge was observed when suckling

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

reported. On evaluation, the calf had moderate signs of distress with a notable honking noise during respiration, tachypnea (respiratory rate, 60 breaths/min), tachycardia (heart rate, 180 beats/min), reduced nasal airflow, and palpably enlarged

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

-year history of chronic rhinitis that had been treated with long-term oral administration of antimicrobials and corticosteroids. After adoption, medications were discontinued and the cat underwent surgical turbinate reduction and periodic nasal flushes

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

concurrent onset of abnormal behaviors that included reluctance to greet the owner, inappetence, and lethargy. The owner reported that the patient had developed epiphora and nasal discharge overnight and had a sudden-onset of sneezing. No vomiting, diarrhea

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association