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of some human and experimental animal studies 12–14 have indicated that hyperglycemia is the main factor. Among dogs, DM is fairly common; type 1 DM is predominant and characterized by hypoinsulinemia and hyperglycemia. 15 Although dogs with DM

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

medetomidine is widely used in feline veterinary practice as an excellent sedative; however, it induces undesirable effects, such as bradyarrhythmia, hyperglycemia, and emesis. 5 – 7 A combination of medetomidine with midazolam and ketamine produces good

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

mm Hg), a base excess of 24.2 mmol/L (reference mean ± 2SD, −4 ± 12 mmol/L), normal plasma lactate concentration (10.5 mmol/L; reference mean ± 2SD, 4.2 ± 6.8 mmol/L), and hyperglycemia (glucose concentration, 33 mmol/L, reference interval, 9 to 16

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

sham-treated cows at the same sampling times. Discussion Continuous IV infusion of 50% dextrose (0.3 g/kg/h) to healthy lactating dairy cows resulted in hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia and a marked reduction in plasma P concentration. Other

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

/L), moderate hyperglycemia (502 mg/dL; reference range, 185 to 355 mg/dL), and hypophosphatemia (1.7 mg/dL; reference range, 2.5 to 5.5 mg/dL). The observed abnormalities in the WBC indices and the hyperglycemia were initially attributed to stress and

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

mineralocorticoid effect 13,14 ; 2) plasma volume expansion, such as occurs in humans with hyperglycemia caused by uncontrolled diabetes mellitus, 15 as a result of glucose intolerance induced in cats by exogenous corticosteroids 16,17 ; 3) left ventricular

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

-sensitive GLUT-4 molecules, among other causes. Slow glucose clearance may be contributory to some of the hyperglycemic conditions detected in camelids, including hyperosmolar disorder, 9 stress hyperglycemia, 10 and persistent hyperglycemia 11 (a diabetes

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

concentration may be a prognostic indicator because hypo- and hyperglycemia are associated with increased morbidity and mortality rates in certain settings. 1 To the authors’ knowledge, the first evidence that BG concentrations should be monitored during

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

phases included baseline infusions of glucose during euglycemia, initiation of hypoglycemia (approx 50 mg/dL) or hyperglycemia (approx 300 mg/dL), hypoglycemic or hyperglycemic steady state maintained for approximately 1 hour, return to midrange glucose

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

commercially available nutritionally balanced and complete diet formulated for adult cats (based on Association of American Feed Control Officials minimums), and no administration of dietary nutritional products or medications. Cats with mild hyperglycemia (up

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research