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to the caudal border of the seventh rib. 2 The cranial and caudal lobar arteries and veins are enlarged. Pleural fissure lines and retraction of lung lobes from the thoracic wall indicate pleural effusion; rounding of the atelectatic lung lobes

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

had grade 3 (on a scale of 1 to 5) lameness in the left hind limb and severe stifle joint effusion was evident. Manipulation of the left stifle joint revealed severe craniocaudal instability and signs of pain on extension. With the patient conscious

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

abdominal serosal detail ventral to the stomach are evidence of bicavitary effusion, and there is a diffuse bronchial pattern in the observable portions of the lungs ( Figure 2 ). Figure 2— Same radiographic images as in Figure 1 . The stomach wall is

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

. Diagnostic Imaging Findings and Interpretation In the right lateral and ventrodorsal radiographic images, decreased visualization of the serosal margins and a heterogeneous appearance to the falciform fat are indicative of effusion ( Figure 2 ). There is a

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

(333 U/L; reference range, 11 to 140 U/L), and hypoalbuminemia (2.0 g/dL; reference range, 2.5 to 3.9 g/dL). The dog was also found to have mild bilateral pleural effusion on a preliminary thoracic point-of-care ultrasound examination. Thoracic and

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

radiographically normal. The thoracic trachea appears to have mild dorsal displacement. A small volume of bilateral pleural effusion and mild retraction of the caudal lung lobes are apparent. Evaluation of the cranial margin of the heart is limited by silhouetting

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

thoracocentesis. Determine whether additional imaging studies are required, or make your diagnosis from Figures 1 —then turn the page → Diagnostic Imaging Findings and Interpretation Pleural effusion is evident; cardiomegaly is suspected on the

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

with a 5-MHz curvilinear probe in an intercostal approach in both sagittal and transverse planes revealed bilateral mild to moderate hypoechoic pleural effusion surrounding the lung lobes. The dog received a transfusion of packed RBCs and fresh frozen

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

pleural fissures consistent with mild pleural effusion ( Figure 2 ). A moderate generalized alveolar pattern is evident in the right lung lobes, and an air bronchogram is evident in the right cranial lung lobe. A focus of gas is in the caudal

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

dilatation-volvulus (GDV) with secondary peritoneal effusion and splenic congestion or torsion. Differential diagnoses for peritoneal effusion include peritonitis, hemorrhage, lymphatic obstruction, hypoalbuminemia, and neoplasia. Alternative differential

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association