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SUMMARY

Sixteen German Shepherd Dogs from 4 litters were IgA-deficient on the basis of at least 1 of 2 serum IgA determinations, and all had small intestinal bacterial overgrowth, as documented by quantitated small intestinal bacterial culture in another study. These dogs were fed 2 diets that differed principally in their protein source (chicken vs beef, milk, and wheat). All dogs were fed each diet for 2 weeks before the study began. Next, all dogs were fed the chicken-based diet for 2 months. Then, half the dogs (group 1) were randomly assigned to continue eating the chicken-based diet, while the other half (group 2) ate a diet containing beef, milk, and wheat proteins. The small intestine was biopsied at the beginning of the study and after dogs had eaten the assigned diet for 2 and 4 months. At 2 months, group-2 dogs had more colonic mucosal mast cells, but this difference did not persist at 4 months. At the end of the study (ie, 4 months), although all dogs were clinically normal, group-2 dogs had significantly (P = 0.010) decreased numbers of jejunal villus plasma cells. However, these histologic changes were not considered clinically important. There were no significant differences in blood eosinophil counts, serum trypsin-like immunoreactivity, or cobalamin, folate, or IgA concentration. Clinical differences were not detected between the 2 groups, before or after the study. Changes were seen in serum IgM and IgG concentrations. Although results of this study suggest that dietary protein may influence intestinal mucosal cell populations, there was no evidence that the protein sources in these 2 diets caused intestinal disease in these dogs under the conditions of this study.

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

cobalamin concentration in serum samples from cats and dogs Serum cobalamin concentration can be used as a diagnostic and prognostic marker in companion animals with intestinal and pancreatic diseases. Cobalamin has traditionally been considered to be

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

, including duration of clinical signs (≤ or > 12 months), apparent appetite, weight loss, and fecal consistency; complete diet history; BCS; and results of diagnostic tests, including measurements of serum TLI, albumin, cobalamin, and folate concentrations

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

gastrointestinal panel revealed high serum lipase activity (feline pancreas-specific lipase, 14.8 ug/L; reference range, 0.0 to 3.5 ug/L) and a critically high cobalamin concentration (1,799 ng/L; reference range, 276 to 1,425 ng/L) with results verified by repeat

Open access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

conditions, including 1 of 2 dogs with gastric carcinoma. 31,40 Folate is a cofactor in numerous biochemical reactions and must be obtained from the diet or through microbial production in the gut. 41 In dogs, measurement of serum folate and cobalamin

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

screening included a CBC, serum biochemical analysis, and urinalysis to exclude metabolic causes for CE. Serum trypsinlike immunoreactivity and serum concentrations of cobalamin and folate were measured at the laboratory of the Department of Pathology and

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

denervation or myocardial hibernation was unclear, but myocardial hibernation was considered more likely. See PAGE 1431 Prevalence and prognostic impact of hypocobalaminemia in dogs with lymphoma Serum cobalamin (vitamin B 12 ) concentrations are

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

of a study 27 in Yorkshire Terriers revealed an association between serum α 1 -PI concentration less than the lower limit of the reference interval and cobalamin deficiency; this is suggestive of severe long-standing distal small intestinal disease

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

. Dogs with hypocobalaminemia received supplemental cobalamin. Dogs that had clinical or histopathologic evidence of colitis received supplemental fiber. Each dog was reevaluated at the veterinary teaching hospital approximately 3 weeks after the initial

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

activity and serum cobalamin concentration. For measurement of serum TK activity, a single blood sample collected in a plain glass tube was submitted to a commercial laboratory. c Presurgical blood samples obtained from cats with no history of recent

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association