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SUMMARY

Heart and body weights were obtained from 230 Greyhounds during necropsy. Sex and age were recorded for each Greyhound. Twenty-nine racing and 21 nonracing Greyhounds among the 230 dogs were compared. Heart-to-body weight ratio was calculated. Statistical analysis was done to determine the effects of age, sex, and racing on heart and body weights and heart-to-body weight ratio.

In adult Greyhounds, mean ± SD body weight was 28.4 ± 3.1 and 31.5 ± 2.8 kg, heart weight was 355.6 ± 52.8 and 381.4 ± 50.8 g, and heart-to-body weight ratio was 1.3 ± 0.2 and 1.2 ± 0.2% for females and males, respectively. Heart and body weights were significantly different between sex and age groups and among nonracing and racing males. However, heart-to-body weight ratio was not significantly different among age, sex, or racing groups.

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

was designed to determine whether change in body weight could be used as a practical, indirect measure of stress and general health in shelter cats. Specifically, the purpose of the study reported here was to identify associations among change in body

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Excess body weight is a frequently observed problem in the canine population. 1,2 Overweight and obese dogs have a shorter life span, reduced quality of life, and increased risk of diseases such as degenerative joint disease and neoplasia

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

between 3 and 15 years of age, adjustment of BAL volume on the basis of body weight yielded constant fractions of ELF. However, the authors are not aware of any studies conducted to compare weight-adjusted and fixed-amount BAL techniques in dogs. The

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

hyperparathyroidism and rickets in a growing puppy. It is common practice for North American Board-Certified Veterinary Nutritionists to prepare homemade diet recipes using weight measurements based on the United States Department of Agriculture’s national nutrient

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

point would be influenced by a dog's body weight, BCIs, and BCS. Materials and Methods Animals The prospective study population consisted of 86 dogs admitted to the Clinic for Small Animal Surgery of the Veterinary University of Vienna between

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

metabolic variables of horses at different amounts of adiposity. However, induction of obesity in a longitudinal study would permit intraindividual comparison of variables before and after weight gain. Such a study design would limit the influence of inter

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

. 2 – 4 Caring for overweight cats is expensive; more money is spent on diagnostic procedures (36% more than for nonoverweight cats) and overall care (an estimated additional $1,178/y). 5 Thus, weight management of overweight cats may improve QOL and

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

not been established. Investigators have found that obesity is associated with the development of IR, 2–4 whereas weight loss has improved IS in horses, 5–7 which suggests that obesity is the primary cause of IR in horses. Equally important

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

weight distribution between the thoracic and pelvic limbs for dogs at various levels of immersion. Therefore, the purpose of the study reported here was to assess changes in vGRF and vGRF distribution in dogs standing on the ground without immersion and

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research