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pleuropneumonia; however, further diagnostic testing such as a transtracheal wash would be necessary to confirm this diagnosis. 1 Worth LT Reef VB . Pericarditis in horses: 18 cases (1986-1995) . J Am Vet Med Assoc 1998 ; 212 : 248 – 253 . 2

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

radiographs showed multifocal, ill-defined, cavitated soft tissue opacities in the left and right caudal lung lobes, along with a moderate diffuse interstitial pattern in the remaining lung fields. A transtracheal wash showed large numbers of neutrophils

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

analysis of samples of the lungs and middle ear. 3,8,9 For live animals, results of PCR assay or culture of transtracheal wash or bronchoalveolar lavage fluid samples may provide a diagnosis. Bacterial culture of nasal swab specimens has lower sensitivity

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

for bacterial culture have been investigated and include nasal swabs, transtracheal swabs, transtracheal washes, NPSs, BALs, lung lavages, lung swabs, and lung tissue specimens. 3–9 Each method has strengths and limitations and varies in terms of the

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

MA . Transtracheal wash from a puppy with respiratory disease . Vet Clin Pathol 2006 ; 35 : 471 – 473 . 10.1111/j.1939-165X.2006.tb00168.x 14. Johnsrude J , Christopher MM , Lung NP , et al. Isolation of Mycoplasma felis from a

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

2008 ; 20 : 459 – 463 . 10.2746/095777308X343860 2. Mastrorilli C , Cesar F , Joiner K , et al. Disseminated lymphoma with large granular lymphocyte morphology diagnosed in a horse via abdominal fluid and transtracheal wash cytology . Vet

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

collected samples of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid or a transtracheal wash may reveal an eosinophilic airway infiltrate. Also, in dogs with EPG, a predominance of eosinophils is seen in pleural effusions, when those are present. 2,3,6,7 Given the multitude

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

pulmonary inflammation Transtracheal wash or bronchoalveolar lavage fluid with neutrophilia,     Transtracheal wash or bronchoalveolar lavage fluid with biomarkers of inflammation, or     Evidence of inflammation on positron emission

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

A, dogs underwent the following procedures in addition to the described airway surgery: castration (n = 9), ovariohysterectomy (3), ophthalmic procedures (7), superficial mass removal (4), transtracheal wash (1), cystotomy (2), tracheoscopy (2) and

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

present, but ultrasonographic features are nonspecific for C pseudotuberculosis , 20 and microbial culture of transtracheal wash or pleural fluid samples is necessary to accurately diagnose infection. Regardless of the site of internal infection

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association