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Squamous cell carcinomas are the most common tumors of the eyes and adnexa of horses and commonly affect the eyelids, third eyelid (nictitating membrane), conjunctiva, and limbus. 1,2 Breeds most frequently affected by SCC include Appaloosa

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Squamous cell carcinoma is, after basal cell carcinoma, the second most common cancer of the skin in humans. 1,2 Squamous cell carcinoma involves cancerous changes to the cells of the middle portion of the epidermal skin layer. This cancer may

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Squamous cell carcinoma is the most common malignant skin neoplasm in cats, comprising approximately 15% of feline skin tumors. 1 Commonly affected sites include the pinnae, eyelids, and the nasal planum. Solar exposure has an important role in

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Summary

Limbal squamous cell carcinoma in 4 horses was treated successfully, using carbon dioxide laser ablation. Tumors were removed, with minimal to no postoperative inflammation or discomfort to the horses. Carbon dioxide laser ablation represents a promising new option in the treatment of limbal squamous cell carcinoma in horses.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

SUMMARY

In Zimbabwe, ocular squamous cell carcinoma (oscc) was frequently observed in 5 breeding herds of Simmental cattle, a Bos taurus breed originating from Switzerland. In these herds, initial signs of oscc were already noticeable in cattle about 3 years old. Gradually, oscc prevalence increased, and 36 to 53% of cattle over 7 years old had 1 or more tumors. More tumors developed in Simmental cattle with periorbital white skin than in cattle with periorbital pigmented skin. Other breeds of cattle (eg, Friesian) also are partly white-faced and live in Zimbabwe in a comparable environment; yet, oscc prevalence was lower in those breeds.

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

, England, March–April 2011. ABBREVIATIONS CI Confidence interval FSA Fibrosarcoma HR Hazard ratio LN Lymph node MST Median survival time SCC Squamous cell carcinoma Footnotes a. Dynaray, Radiation Technology Ltd, Wantage

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

lymph node metastasis in dogs with OMM or OSCC. ABBREVIATIONS MLN Mandibular lymph node MRLN Medial retropharyngeal lymph node OMM Oral malignant melanoma OSCC Oral squamous cell carcinoma VSSO Veterinary Society of Surgical Oncology

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Summary

Proportional hospital accession ratios for equine ocular/adnexal squamous cell carcinoma (scc) were determined for 14 colleges of veterinary medicine participating in the Veterinary Medical Data Program between January 1978 and December 1986. Comparison of the ratios with their respective geographical, physical data has shown an increased prevalence of scc with an increase in longitude, altitude, or mean annual solar radiation. In contrast, prevalence of scc increased with a decrease in latitude.

Between January 1978 and December 1988, 147 horses with ocular/adnexal scc were admitted to the Colorado State University Veterinary Teaching Hospital. Diagnosis was confirmed by histologic examination of appropriate tissue specimens. Medical records provided information regarding month and year of admission and diagnosis, age at diagnosis, breed, gender, and hair color. Comparison with a randomly selected hospital control population revealed an increased prevalence of ocular/adnexal scc with an increase in age (P < 0.001). Compared with Quarter Horses, draft breeds (Belgian, Clydesdale, and Shire) and Appaloosas had a significantly (P < 0.001) greater prevalence of ocular/adnexal scc. Sexually intact males and females were significantly (P < 0.001) less likely (5 and 2 times, respectively) to have ocular/adnexal scc when compared with castrated males. The prevalence of ocular/adnexal scc was significantly greater for all hair colors when compared with bay, brown, or black (P < 0.01).

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Summary

Ninety cats were irradiated for treatment of squamous cell carcinoma of the nasal plane. The 1- and 5-year progression-free survival rates were 60.1 ± 5.5% and 10.3 ± 6.2%, respectively. Analysis of progression-free survival times revealed that clinical stage and tumor proliferative fraction (estimated by the use of a proliferating cell nuclear-antigen immunohistochemical method) had significant prognostic value. Conversely, coat color, presence of multiple facial carcinomas, histologic grade, and feline immunodeficiency virus infection status were not found to have prognostic value. Acute radiation reactions were mild and self-limiting. Severe chronic radiation reactions were more frequent in cats infected with feline immunodeficiency virus. Results of the study indicated that cats with squamous cell carcinoma of the nasal plane benefit from radiotherapy and that treatment might be improved by increasing the radiation dose as well as altering the dose-fractionation scheme.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the use of piroxicam for the treatment of oral squamous cell carcinoma in dogs.

Design—Prospective case series.

Animals—17 dogs with measurable oral squamous cell carcinoma.

Procedure—Dogs were treated with piroxicam at a dosage of 0.3 mg/kg (0.14 mg/lb) of body weight, PO, every 24 hours until progressive disease or unacceptable signs of toxicosis developed or the dog died.

Results—One dog had a complete remission (maxillary tumor), and 2 dogs had partial remissions (lingual tumor and tonsillar tumor). An additional 5 dogs had stable disease, including 1 with a maxillary tumor, 2 with mandibular tumors, and 2 with tonsillar tumors. Variables associated with tumor response were not identified. Median and mean times to failure for the 3 dogs that had a remission were 180 and 223 days, respectively. Median and mean times to failure for the 5 dogs with stable disease were 102 and 223 days, respectively. Time to failure was positively associated with tumor response and negatively associated with tumor size. One dog had mild adverse gastrointestinal tract effects that resolved with the addition of misoprostol to the treatment regimen.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that piroxicam may be useful in the treatment of dogs with oral squamous cell carcinoma; response rate was similar to that reported for other cytotoxic treatments. Larger-scale studies are warranted to determine what role piroxicam may have, alone or in combination with other treatments, for the treatment of dogs with oral squamous cell carcinoma. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2001;218:1783–1786)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association