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repeated bleeding. In consultation with the Oncology Service, Veterinary Health Center at the Kansas State University, a postoperative definitive radiation therapy protocol was developed. The cockatoo was mask-induced with 5% isoflurane prior to being

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Summary

Using a 1-stage random-digit dial telephone survey, we estimated the number of pet dogs and cats and cancer case ascertainment in the principal catchment area of an animal tumor registry in Indiana, the Purdue Comparative Oncology Program (PCOP). These findings will assist in the estimation of pet cancer incidence rates for the PCOP. The estimated canine and feline populations for Marion County were 144,039 (95% confidence interval, 121,555 to 166,523) and 94,998 (74,384 to 115,648), respectively. For Tippecanoe County (excluding university housing residences), the estimated canine population was 18,000 (14,445 to 21,555), whereas the estimated feline population was 17,165 (12,569 to 21,761). The estimated cancer case ascertainment was 88.3% (dogs, 92.5%; cats, 83.0%) with no statistically significant difference in the estimated ascertainment by county of residence or by species of pet. The amount that owners report themselves willing to pay for treatment of cancer in dogs or cats, however, differed in counties polled. This method's appropriateness for estimating pet populations in general and the validity of the data gathered were supported by response rate of 88.0% and by concurrence with census data for household characteristics previously documented to be associated with pet dog and cat ownership.

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

particularly proud of the strides we have made in small animal oncology: Comprehensive service: With a group of 7 faculty and 8 trainees across the specialties of medical, surgical, and radiation oncology working together under 1 roof, we are one of the

Open access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

. Consultation with the oncology service after 1 month to determine whether radiation therapy could be used to treat the dog's residual disease was advised. Figure 1 Photomicrograph of a section of the liver mass in a 14-year-old Toy Poodle that was removed

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To assess the predictability of the hemangiosarcoma likelihood prediction (HeLP) score and the Tufts Splenic Tumor Assessment Tool (T-STAT) for hemangiosarcoma and malignancy, respectively.

ANIMALS

261 dogs undergoing splenectomy for a splenic mass.

METHODS

Medical records were retrospectively reviewed; variables for the HeLP score and T-STAT were collected, and scores were assigned. Area under the curve (AUC) was calculated for each score.

RESULTS

The HeLP score included 141 dogs; hemangiosarcoma was diagnosed in 87 (61.7%) dogs. The median cumulative HeLP score was 51 (range, 17 to 82; IQR, 39 to 58) for dogs with hemangiosarcoma and 28 (range, 0 to 70; IQR, 17 to 41) for dogs without hemangiosarcoma. The categorical HeLP score was low (28; 32.2%), medium (31; 35.6%), and high (28; 32.2%) for dogs with hemangiosarcoma and was low (41; 75.9%), medium (9; 16.7%), and high (4; 7.4%) for dogs without hemangiosarcoma. The AUC of the cumulative and categorical HeLP scores for diagnosis of hemangiosarcoma were 0.79 (95% CI, 0.71 to 0.86) and 0.73 (95% CI, 0.65 to 0.82), respectively. The T-STAT included 181 dogs. Lesions were benign in 95 (52.5%) and malignant in 86 (47.5%) dogs. The median T-STAT score was 62% (range, 5% to 98%; IQR, 36% to 77%) for dogs with malignant lesions and 38% (range, 5% to 91%; IQR, 24% to 59%) for dogs with benign lesions. The T-STAT had an AUC of 0.68 (0.60 to 0.76) for diagnosis of malignancy.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

The HeLP score had acceptable performance, and the T-STAT had poor performance for diagnosis prediction. A tool with excellent or outstanding discrimination is needed to more reliably predict the presence of hemangiosarcoma or a malignant lesion preoperatively.

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

that studying naturally occurring cancer in privately owned dogs may provide results that are more clinically applicable to human oncology than are results obtained from studies of induced tumors in laboratory animal species. A phase I study of C

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

referral hospital (Fitzpatrick Referrals Oncology and Soft Tissue). Inclusion criteria consisted of canine patients that underwent partial pancreatectomy and, if appropriate, metastasectomy as treatment of recently diagnosed insulinoma; assessment of BG

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Summary

A 1-stage, random-digit dial telephone survey was conducted to obtain information on characteristics of pet populations and pet-owning households in 1988 in Marion and Tippecanoe Counties, Indiana. Interviews for 653 out of 731 eligible households were completed (response rate, 88%). Approximately half of the households in each county owned a pet. Of these, 35% owned at least 1 dog, and 23% owned at least 1 cat. Households with pets were more likely to be larger and have a higher median income score than were households without pets. Households with children between 6 and 17 years old were more likely to own pets than were households with no children; however, no difference in pet ownership proportions was determined for households with children ≤ 5 years old, compared with households without children. For dogs, younger dogs and male dogs were less likely to have been neutered than older dogs and female dogs. Older cats were more likely to have been neutered than younger cats, with neutering percentages of > 90% for cats in the oldest age group. Approximately 20% of dogs and 40% of cats had not been seen by a veterinarian in the 12 months preceding the interview.

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association