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of xylazine at a dose of 100 or 200 μg/kg (45 or 91 μg/lb). See page 533 Oleander toxicosis in equids Oleander intoxication should be considered in the differential diagnosis for equids with colic in geographic areas where oleander is

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

affect the digestive system of equids and cause enterocolitis, typhlitis, or both. 8 In addition, toxicoses from toxins (eg, oleandrin [the toxic principle of Nerium oleander ] 4,9 ) or drugs (eg, NSAIDs 8 ) can affect the digestive tract and result in

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

selenium, thiamine, copper, and taurine. 3 Toxicoses can be related to ionophore toxicity (eg, monensin in ruminants), rodenticides containing thallium, gossypol, or poisonous plants such as those containing glycoside (eg, oleander). 3 Myocardial necrosis

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

, blister beetles, aortic rupture, and lightning strike. Ingestion of cardiac glycosides in oleander, foxglove, or summer pheasant's eye can cause sudden death in horses. In a study of 30 horses with oleander toxicosis ( J Am Vet Med Assoc 2013

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

.06 mg/mL). Serum digoxin concentration was also measured in light of the owner’s concerns about possible oleander toxicosis and was low (0.2 ng/mL; reference range, 0.8 to 2.0 ng/mL). Serum anti– Trypanosoma cruzi antibody titer was 320:1, which was

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Adhesions 1 Strangulating cecal lesion 1 Endocarditis 1 Esophageal rupture 1 Femur fracture 1 Gastric impaction 1 Strangulating small colon lesion 1 Oleander toxicosis 1 Small colon impaction

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

59 foals with high liver enzyme activities. Of these foals, 49 were alive at 1 to 6 years of age. Reasons for death or euthanasia of the remaining 10 horses included lameness or fracture (n = 4), oleander intoxication (1), head injury (1), and small

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Moderate High Moderate Moderate Organophosphates High High High Moderate None Taxus sp Moderate Minimal High Minimal Moderate Bluegreen algae Moderate None High Minimal High Oleander Moderate

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Competition: First place, sponsored by ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center: Dr. Liliana Oldenburg, Washington State University, for “Oleander toxicity: A review”; second place: Dr. Kristen Tjerandsen, Washington State University, for “PFTE toxicity in birds

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

sudden death resulting from toxic plants, blister beetles, aortic rupture, and lightning strike. Ingestion of cardiac glycosides in oleander, foxglove, or summer pheasant’s eye can cause sudden death in horses. In a study of 30 horses with oleander

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