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screening test for occult hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) in cats. 1 The authors concluded that the relatively low sensitivity of the test (43%) precluded its use as a screening test in apparently healthy cats. Subsequently, 2 other authors, in a review

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

control, also caused no clinical signs such as vomiting, diarrhea, and anorexia in dogs. However, mild to moderate gastric mucosal lesions were observed, mostly in the pyloric antrum, and were confirmed by use of endoscopy and fecal occult blood tests

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

number of dogs (1 sample/dog). * Dog with occult infection. — = Not applicable. F = Female. M = Male. Detection of D immitis infections in canine blood samples via the PCR–ESI-MS assay —Whole blood samples from 29 dogs infected with D immitis

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

rotational perch time = baseline perching time − perching time at each testing period. Fecal occult blood evaluation —Voided fresh feces were collected from the cage bottom of each parrot or from the testing boxes at the final testing time in each period

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

ovariohysterectomy were enrolled. For inclusion, cats were required to be aged ≥ 6 months, weigh ≥ 2 kg, and to have normal laboratorial tests [complete blood count, blood coagulation (prothrombin time test), serum clinical biochemistry analysis, and fecal occult

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

longitudinal examinations within a recheck period ranging from 1 to 2.5 years. Three dogs developed occult DCM (1 who was originally diagnosed with equivocal DCM and 2 that were originally normal), 1 dog transitioned from normal to an equivocal DCM diagnosis

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

; specific gravity was measured with a handheld refractometer d ; pH and concentrations of proteins, glucose, ketones, and bilirubin, and fecal occult blood were determined by use of multiple-test reagent strips; e and urinary sediment was evaluated with a

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

,41 Gastrointestinal ulcers with hemorrhage can be evaluated by means of occult blood tests. Given that these tests are based on an oxidative reaction, other oxidative agents can cause false-positive results. 42 All NSAIDs undergo hepatic metabolism. 43,44 Although

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

(EPO) production of failing kidneys, 1 , 3 – 5 “functional” iron deficiency, 6 nutritional imbalances caused by hyporexia/anorexia, 3 and visible or occult gastrointestinal bleeding. 6 In dogs, in contrast to people, there is no decrease in red

Open access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Dogs with high weight-adjusted LVIDs, with or without Holter-detected arrhythmias suggestive of DCM, were classified as having occult DCM. Echocardiographic, Holter, and genetic data were used to classify dogs as without DCM and the PDK4 mutation

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research