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% to 5% but is > 10% in some herds. 3–7 Various surgical procedures have been used, all of which have specific advantages and disadvantages. Open surgical techniques include abomasopexy via the ventral paramedian approach 8 ; laparotomy via the left

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Summary

A study was conducted to investigate indications for, typical findings during, and outcome of repeat laparotomies in 57 cattle with gastrointestinal disorders. Cattle were grouped according to the reason the initial laparotomy had been performed. Group-1 cattle (n = 46) had had left or right displacement of the abomasum (lda or rda) or right volvulus of the abomasum. Group-2 cattle (n = 10) had had ruminal, reticular, or abomasal obstruction or perforation. Group-3 cattle (n = 7) had had obstruction, volvulus, distention, or perforation of the small or large intestine.

Median interval between laparotomies was 1 month (range, 1 day to 38 months). Intraoperative findings during repeat laparotomy in group-1 cattle included lda (n = 18), rda (9), right volvulus of the abdomen (5), pneumoperitoneum (1), diffuse abdominal adhesions (1), cecal adhesions (1), adhesions of the rumen to the body wall (1), abscess in the cranial portion of the abdomen (1), reticular adhesions (1), localized necrosis (1), and idiopathic rumen distention (1). Intraoperative findings during repeat laparotomy in group-2 cattle included abscess in the cranial portion of the abdomen (4), no abnormalities (1), distended rumen (1), ruptured abomasum (1), recurrent abomasal impaction (1), diffuse abdominal adhesions (1), and pyloric fat necrosis (1). Intraoperative findings during repeat laparotomy in group-3 cattle included lda (3), rda (1), cecal volvulus (1), anastomotic rupture (1), and impacted colocolostomy (1).

Seven cows and 1 calf underwent additional repeat laparotomies. Forty-four (77%) of the 57 cattle were discharged following final laparotomy. Fourteen of the 20 group-1 cattle, 1 of the 6 group-2 cattle, and 2 of the 3 group-3 cattle for which follow-up information was available were productive after repeat laparotomy.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

surgical procedure used. 1,6 Several surgical techniques have been developed to reposition the abomasum after LDA develops. 5,7–9 The standard technique most often used in North America is omentopexy via laparotomy in the right paralumbar fossa. 5

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Summary

Plasma and peritoneal fluid samples were collected before and after surgery from 6 horses undergoing a ventral midline exploratory laparotomy and from 6 anesthetized control horses. Coagulation/fibrinolytic components measured in the plasma and peritoneal fluid of these horses included the functional activity of antithrombin III, α-2 antiplasmin, plasminogen, and protein C, and the concentrations of fibrinogen and fibrin degradation products. Peritoneal fluid antithrombin III, fibrin degradation products, and plasminogen values were significantly increased after surgery (over time) in principal horses. Compared with control horses, postoperative peritoneal fluid from horses undergoing laparotomy had significantly increased antithrombin-III activity at 12 and 72 hours, α-2 antiplasmin activity at 24 hours, fibrin degradation product concentrations at 6, 12, 24, 72, 96, and 144 hours, plasminogen activity at 6, 12, 24, 48, 72, and 96 hours, and protein-C activity at 12, 24, 72, and 96 hours. There were no significant changes in the peritoneal fibrinogen concentration in principal horses. Plasma plasminogen activity was significantly decreased at 24 hours after surgery in principal horses, compared with controls. Changes were minimal in the remaining plasma coagulation/fibrinolytic components of horses undergoing laparotomy. Plasma and peritoneal fluid values of anesthetized control horses did not change.

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Objective

To determine, in a population of young horses, whether a variation exists among neonates, sucklings, weanlings, and yearlings regarding recovery from anesthesia, short- and long-term survival rates, and postoperative adhesion formation following exploratory laparotomy.

Design

Retrospective study.

Animals

102 horses < 25 months old that underwent exploratory laparotomy.

Procedure

Pre-, intra-, and postoperative information was retrieved from medical records, conversations with referring veterinarians, owners, or trainers, and race records. Survival rates (recovery from anesthesia and short- and long-term survival) were compared with age, lesion type, lesion location, surgical procedure, and development of clinically important postoperative intestinal adhesions.

Results

Of the 73 horses that recovered from anesthesia, 69 were available for follow-up. Of the 69 horses, 7 (10%) died of complications associated with formation of intestinal adhesions. Age did not affect incidence of adhesion formation, lesion type, lesion location, or surgical procedure performed. Long-term survival rate after surgery for correction of a small-intestinal lesion was 34%, whereas that after surgery for correction of a large-intestinal lesion was 65%.

Clinical Implications

Surgical treatment of colic in young horses resulted in survival rates that are similar to those reported for mature horses. The incidence of clinically important postoperative adhesions was greater than that found for young horses in earlier studies. This may be the result of the younger age of our study population. Alternatively, improvements in operative techniques and postoperative management may allow a larger percentage of horses to survive long term and develop complications such as adhesion formation. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1997;211:1158–1162)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

lymphosarcoma are often the remaining differentials. Definitive diagnosis of IBD and lymphosarcoma requires histologic evaluation of gastrointestinal biopsy specimens, which may be obtained via endoscopy, laparotomy, or laparoscopy. 1,2 Advantages and

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

approach was converted to a laparotomy and, if so, the reason for conversion; whether a transfusion was administered; hospitalization time; and histologic diagnosis. Surgical complications were defined as conversion to laparotomy and anemia requiring

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

A 10-week-old 0.73-kg (1.6-lb) castrated male domestic ferret (Mustela putorius furo) was referred to the Exotic Animal Clinical Service of the Veterinary Teaching Hospital at the University of Montréal for exploratory laparotomy because of

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association