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Although assessment of multilimb lameness is frequently performed in clinical practice, it can be challenging, and it is essential to consider the effect of compensatory lameness to correctly identify the primary lame limb. Recently, our group

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Trauma and diseases that cause lameness are the most common medical problems in horses. 1–7 Especially within the racehorse industry, economic losses attributable to lameness are substantial. 8 Also, catastrophic injuries in racehorses, which

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Lameness is an important and prevalent medical condition in horses 1 and accounts for up to $1 billion in losses for the US equine industry annually. 2 Horses with subclinical or mild lameness have suboptimal performance, 3,4 and mild lameness

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Introduction In most situations, lameness in horses causes asymmetries that can be detected when assessing movement at a symmetric gait such as the trot. 1 Objective gait analysis is needed to accurately detect and quantify lameness. 2 , 3

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Ground reaction forces obtained by use of force platform gait analysis are an important objective outcome measurement in canine clinical trials. The PVF and VI correlate with lameness severity. 1,2 The PVF represents the maximal load exerted by a

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Lameness is the most commonly reported health problem affecting all types of horses and costs the horse industry millions of dollars annually. 1 Although diagnoses and treatments have been described for specific musculoskeletal problems that

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Lameness is one of the most important medical issues of horses 1 and accounts for annual losses up to $1 billion for the US equine industry. 2 Horses with subclinical or mild lameness often have suboptimal performance. 3,4 Early detection of

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Lameness is the most common cause of poor performance of racing and sport horses. 1,2 The mainstay for evaluation of gait abnormalities is subjective lameness assessment by an experienced equine practitioner and grading with an interval scale

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

studies. 2,3 Frequently, local anesthetic solution is instilled into 1 of the 3 synovial compartments of the stifle joint of lame horses to isolate the site of lameness-causing pain. The uncertainty regarding the anatomic or functional communication

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Degenerative injury to the PA in horses causes chronic forelimb lameness because of pain arising from the navicular bone and soft tissues of the PA, such as the CSLs, distal sesamoidean impar ligament, podotrochlear bursa (ie, NB), and deep

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research