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electrolyte solutions resulted in hyperglycemia and an increased incidence of metabolic derangements in blood gas values. 5 Historically, administration of LRS has not been recommended for reptiles because of concern that this would lead to hyperlactatemia 2

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

of different potential interferents (hemolysis, hyperbilirubinemia, increased BUN, lipemia, and hyperglycemia) on the accuracy of the DR measurements. We hypothesized that the DR would be accurate compared to the AR and LAB and that hemolysis

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

reported 7 to increase the risk of morbidity in hospitalized patients, whereas parenteral nutrition has in turn been found to reduce the morbidity rate for malnourished patients. Hyperglycemia can develop when parenteral nutrition is provided to humans

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research
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-hospital, tabletop serum biochemical analyzer, a revealed hyperglycemia (blood glucose concentration, 855 mg/dL; reference range, 63 to 134 mg/dL 1 ) and mild azotemia (creatinine concentration, 0.9 mg/dL [reference range, 0.2 to 0.6 mg/dL 1 ]; BUN concentration, 45

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

of disorders and reasons for hospital admission. Glucose is the main source of energy in reptiles as in mammals, 7 and its metabolism is tightly regulated by several hormones. 8 Blood glucose derangements in mammals, both hyperglycemia and

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

abnormalities e included severe hyperglycemia (1,300 mg/dL; reference range, 1 94 to 170 mg/dL), hypernatremia (176 mEq/L; reference range, 1 148 to 155 mEq/L), hyperchloremia (119 mEq/L; reference range, 1 101 to 116 mEq/L), hyperbilirubinemia (0.7 mg

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

/dL), hyperbilirubinemia (6.9 mg/dL; reference range, 0.3 to 2.5 mg/dL), hyperglycemia (484 mg/dL; reference range, 70 to 105 mg/dL), hyponatremia (124 mmol/L; reference range, 130 to 140 mmol/L), and hypochloremia (77 mmol/L; reference range, 97 to 105 mmol/L). Urinalysis

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

syndrome and pituitary pars intermedia dysfunction 2 in horses. Serial monitoring of blood glucose concentration in horses receiving carbohydrate-containing fluids IV (eg, those administered to anorectic or hyperlipemic horses) to avoid hyperglycemia 3 is

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Hyperglycemia associated with critical illness in nondiabetic patients is commonly detected in human ICUs. 1,2 Although this has historically been considered an incidental finding, there is a growing appreciation that this finding has prognostic

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

hematologic abnormalities (detected in > 50% of animals tested) included leukocytosis (81%), neutrophilia (100%), hyperfibrinogenemia (58%), hyperglycemia (80%), hypoproteinemia (56%), hypoalbuminemia (78%), hyperbilirubinemia (59%), hypocalcemia (74

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association