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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

The stratum medium of the equine hoof wall is a keratinized tissue with material characteristics and material properties that facilitate the accommodation of forces associated with static and dynamic weight bearing. The mechanical properties of

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

SUMMARY

Explants from the matrix of the stratum medium of the wall of the equine and bovine hoof each were cultured on a microporous membrane, using a standard culture medium. After incubation at 37 C, the outgrowth was a mixture of keratinocytes and fibroblasts, with predominance of the latter. After incubation at 34 C, the keratinocytes dominated, covering the lateral surfaces of the explant as well as the basal surface. Lateral outgrowth of keratinocytes was observed at the borderline of the original epidermis and at the borderline of the explant’s contact with the membrane. Epithelial outgrowth from the former consisted of rounded aggregates protruding into the medium, whereas outgrowth from the latter formed a pluristratified carpet occupying a considerable part of the membrane. In the outer layers, keratinocytes covering the cut surfaces of the dermis of the explant had a differentiation pattern of the kind that characterizes the keratinocytes of the hoof; differentiation was not observed in the lateral outgrowth.

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Keratomas are an uncommon cause of lameness in equids. 1 Although their pathogenesis has not been conclusively determined, keratomas are believed to develop secondary to inflammation induced by hoof wall trauma at the level of the coronary band

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

, as described herein, for cattle that have reportedly not been fed β-adrenergic receptor agonists to develop FCS. Unlike pigs with FPS, some cattle with FCS sloughed the entire hoof wall from 1 or more digits. This results in extreme discomfort and

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Introduction Injuries to the hoof wall and feet of horses are common in equine practice. 1 – 3 The most common injuries to the foot and hoof wall are secondary to trauma (hoof wall avulsion, heel bulb laceration, etc) or penetrating foreign

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

phosphate (pH, 7.2 to 7.4). Following fixation for 3 to 4 days, samples were obtained from the midline of the dorsal aspect of the hoof wall and from the frog (cuneus ungulae) between the apex and central sulcus (1-cm-wide and 1-cm-thick sections

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

In horses, the mechanical properties of the hoof wall are, to a large extent, a function of its structural arrangement. Grossly defined parts of the hoof protect underlying structures of the foot and initiate dissipation of concussive forces on

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

between the hoof wall and sole that is visible at the ground surface as the white line. The white line is clinically important in hoof wall diseases such as white line disease and laminitis. 1 The white line is believed to serve as a marker of the

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

, and discharging tracts were observed at the level of the distal sesamoid bone (navicular bone) after the loose section of the hoof wall was removed. The diagnostic workup for bulls 2 and 3 was the same as that for bull 1. Radiographically, the medial

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association