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abdominal trauma, recent gastrointestinal surgery, lymphocytic-plasmocytic enteritis, nonspecific gastrointestinal disease, dietary indiscretion, trauma, treatment of ascariasis, parvoviral infection, exocrine pancreatic insufficiency, intussusception, ileal

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

undergoing surgery for treatment of an acute colic episode often have intraoperative evidence suggestive of inflammatory gastrointestinal disease. Some of these horses were subsequently treated with dexamethasone (0.05 to 0.2 mg/kg [0.023 to 0.09 mg/lb], IV

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the use of immunofluorescence asssays for perinuclear antineutrophilic cytoplasmic antibodies (pANCAs) and antibodies to Saccharomyces cerevisiae (ASCAs) in dogs with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and assess the clinical value of these serologic markers of the disease.

Animals—39 dogs with IBD, 18 dogs with acute diarrhea, 19 dogs with chronic non–IBD-associated diarrhea, 26 healthy dogs of various breeds and age, and 22 healthy young working dogs.

Procedure—Sera obtained from the dogs in each group were added to canine granulocyte- and Saccharomyces cerevisiae-mounted slides for detection of pANCAs and ASCAs via immunofluorescence techniques. Sensitivity and specificity (with 95% confidence intervals [CIs]) were calculated for the group of dogs with IBD versus each of the 2 groups of healthy dogs, the group of dogs with acute diarrhea, and the group of dogs with chronic non–IBD-associated diarrhea.

Results—Among the 39 dogs with IBD, 20 yielded positive results via the pANCA assay (sensitivity, 0.51 [95% CI, 0.35 to 0.67]) and 17 yielded positive results via the ASCA assay (sensitivity, 0.44 [95% CI, 0.22 to 0.69]). The specificity of the pANCA assay in the 4 groups of non–IBD-affected dogs ranged from 0.83 (95% CI, 0.85 to 0.96) to 0.95 (95% CI, 0.72 to 1.00).

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Immunofluorescence assays for pANCA and ASCA appear to be useful for the detection of IBD in dogs. The pANCA immunofluorescence assay had high specificity for canine IBD, and pANCAs appear to be accurate markers of intestinal inflammation. (Am J Vet Res 2004;65:1279–1283)

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

include recurrent infections of the respiratory, urogenital, and gastrointestinal tracts as well as infections of the skin. 2–5 It has been shown that humans with IgAD are at an elevated risk to develop chronic gastrointestinal disease. 2 Often, however

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

the villus tip within the small intestine and luminal surface in the colon. 9,28 Although this protein biomarker has been previously used for assessment of apoptosis in horses with gastrointestinal disease, 28 our study confirmed the utility of

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

healthy dogs. Panel B: Plasma GLP-2 from 14 of the same CE dogs after 30 days of treatment for gastrointestinal disease vs healthy dogs. Data presented as median, range. * P < .05, ** P < .01, *** P < .001. CE = chronic enteropathy. GLP-2 = glucagon

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

gastrojejunostomy tube placement in this study were similar to previous reports 12,13 of surgically placed jejunostomy tubes and included severe gastrointestinal disease, extrahepatic biliary surgery, and pancreatic disease. Reported complications of surgically

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

revealed lymphoplasmacytic, neutrophilic hepatitis with portal bridging fibrosis and biliary hyperplasia. Gastroscopy or gastroduodenoscopy was performed as a diagnostic test in 10 equids because of nonspecific findings of gastrointestinal disease (mild

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

that were likely secondary to chronic gastrointestinal disease and malnutrition. Results of abdominal ultrasonography were unremarkable except for segmental increased echogenicity of the small intestinal mucosa and thickening of the submucosa. Pyuria

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

gastrointestinal mucosa. Materials and Methods Specimen collection and grouping —Gastrointestinal mucosal specimens were collected from 17 horses euthanatized at the University of Illinois for reasons other than gastrointestinal disease. These horses were of

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research