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Administration, Republic of Korea. The authors declare that there were no conflicts of interest. ABBREVIATIONS A Transmitral peak late diastolic velocity A' Tissue Doppler–derived peak late diastolic velocity at basal segment DM Diabetes mellitus

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To compare aesthesiometer-determined corneal sensitivity between diabetic and nondiabetic dogs and to investigate the correlation between corneal sensitivity and duration of diabetes or status of glycemic control, as estimated by use of glycated blood protein concentrations.

Animals—23 diabetic and 29 nondiabetic normoglycemic dogs.

Procedure—A Cochet-Bonnet aesthesiometer was used to measure corneal touch threshold (CTT) in 5 corneal regions of each dog. At the time of ocular examination, duration of diabetes mellitus was estimated from the history, and blood was drawn for assessment of blood glycosylated hemoglobin and serum fructosamine concentrations.

Results—Median CTT for central, nasal, dorsal, temporal, and ventral corneal regions in nondiabetic dogs (1.6, 2.3, 2.8, 2.8, and 5.1 g/mm2, respectively) was significantly lower than in diabetic dogs (2.8, 4.0, 5.1, 5.1, and 6.6 g/mm2, respectively). Median regional CTT in diabetic dogs was not significantly correlated with estimated duration of diabetes mellitus or blood glycated protein concentrations. No significant difference was found in regional CTT between eyes of normoglycemic dogs with unilateral cataracts.

Conclusion and Clinical Relevance—Diabetic dogs have significantly reduced corneal sensitivity in all regions, compared with nondiabetic normoglycemic dogs. Regional variation in corneal sensitivity is similar in diabetic and normoglycemic dogs. Neither glycemic control nor duration of diabetes, as estimated, is significantly correlated with corneal hyposensitivity. Corneal nerve dysfunction may be associated with recurrent or nonhealing ulcers in diabetic dogs for which no other underlying cause can be found. (Am J Vet Res 2003;64:7–11)

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

results of physical and laboratory examinations; blood glucose concentrations were within the reference range. Blood samples were collected during routine health examinations. Cats with diabetes mellitus —Seven cats with DM were enrolled in the study

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

The use of several insulin preparations, including SC administration of NPH insulin for dogs with uncomplicated diabetes mellitus and IV administration of lispro insulin for dogs with diabetic ketoacidosis has been described. 1,2 However, a

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Diabetes mellitus is a common endocrinopathy in dogs, with reported prevalence ranging from 1 in 100 to 1 in 500 dogs affected. 1 The cause of DM in dogs is multifactorial, and studies 2–5 suggest that genetics, environmental factors, and immune

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

were also collected from 13 client-owned diabetic dogs. Diabetes mellitus was diagnosed on the basis of clinical signs (eg, polyuria and polydipsia, weakness, and weight loss) and an unfed BG concentration > 200 mg/dL combined with glycosuria. Eight

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Many similarities exist between type 2 diabetes mellitus in cats and in humans. 1,2 Both conditions typically have an onset in middle age or later, are associated with obesity, and are characterized by defective insulin secretion, insulin

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

hyperglycemia within the patient. 2 Determination of and monitoring of serum fructosamine concentrations has become an important part of the diagnosis and management of diabetes mellitus in dogs and cats, 3,4 and its use has also been explored in numerous

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine the prevalence of systemic hypertension in cats with diabetes mellitus and establish ranges for echocardiographic variables in diabetic cats.

Design—Prospective study.

Animals—14 cats with diabetes mellitus and 19 healthy control cats.

Procedure—Systolic blood pressure was measured indirectly with a noninvasive Doppler technique. Ophthalmic and echocardiographic examinations were performed, and urine protein concentration was measured. Cats were considered to have hypertension if they had systolic blood pressure > 180 mm Hg and at least 1 other clinical abnormality typically associated with hypertension (eg, hypertensive retinopathy, left ventricular hypertrophy, or proteinuria).

Results—None of the diabetic or control cats had systolic blood pressure > 180 mm Hg. One diabetic cat had left ventricular hypertrophy, but systolic blood pressure was 174 mm Hg. None of the cats had evidence of hypertensive retinopathy or proteinuria. Mean values for echocardiographic variables for the diabetic cats were not significantly different from published values for healthy cats.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that hypertension does not occur or occurs in only a small percentage of cats with diabetes mellitus. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2003;223:198–201)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

populations and their products. 14–17 Thus, supplementation with fiber may be useful in the management of diseases such as diabetes mellitus and obesity in canine patients. In diabetic dogs, a diet with high IDF content is reported to improve glycemic

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association