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Abstract

Objective

To evaluate the effect of peritoneal lavage on pharmacokinetics of gentamicin sulfate in healthy horses after experimental celiotomy.

Animals

13 clinically normal horses.

Procedure

Horses were randomly assigned to control or experimental groups. All horses received gentamicin (6.6 mg/kg of body weight, IV, q 24 h) before surgery, underwent experimental abdominal surgery, and had abdominal drains placed percutaneously. Horses of the experimental group received postoperative peritoneal lavage; horses of the control group did not receive peritoneal lavage. The day after surgery, 24 hours after the preoperative dose of gentamicin, a second dose of gentamicin was administered. Three and 15 hours after this second dose of gentamicin, horses of the experimental group received peritoneal lavage. Venous blood was obtained, for determination of concentration of gentamicin, immediately before and at specified intervals during the 24-hour period after the second dose of gentamicin.

Results

There were no differences in any of the pharmacokinetic values of gentamicin between horses of the control and experimental groups.

Conclusions

Peritoneal lavage had no effect on pharmacokinetics of gentamicin in healthy horses after abdominal surgery, in which localized nonseptic peritonitis was induced.

Clinical Relevance

Peritoneal lavage in horses with localized nonseptic peritonitis or for the prevention of intra-abdominal adhesions should not necessitate alteration of the dosage of gentamicin to maintain predictable serum concentrations. (Am J Vet Res 1997;58:1166–1170)

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

), and xylazine hydrochloride c (0.5 mg/kg [0.23 mg/lb], IV; 4 doses). On the basis of a presumptive diagnosis of displacement of the ascending colon, the decision was made to undertake exploratory celiotomy. Prior to induction of anesthesia, 7

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Introduction An ideal incisional closure device provides effective skin apposition, ease of application, and good cosmesis and has a low rate of complications. 1 – 4 This concept applies to closure of equine ventral midline celiotomies, in

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

— Medical records of cattle that underwent celiotomy from 2000 through 2007 at the veterinary medical teaching hospital at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, were accessed. An additional selection criterion was visual or palpable evidence of blood clots

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Methods Animals —Medical records of all horses that underwent exploratory celiotomy at the University of Georgia Veterinary Teaching Hospital from 2000 through 2010 were reviewed. Horses were included in this study if impaction of the cecal cupula had

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

purposes. Pigs that underwent at least 1 exploratory celiotomy for diagnosis or treatment of a GIT disorder were included in the study. Pigs that were managed medically or euthanized without surgery were excluded from the study. Medical records review

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Cooperative Oncology Group–Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events scheme. 15 If conversion to open celiotomy occurred, the reason for conversion was recorded and it was graded (1 to 4) on the basis of a previously published classification scheme. 16

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Animal Hospital between June 2006 and June 2010. A keyword-based search method was used. Key search terms included South American camelid, alpaca, llama, cria, impaction, spiral colon, and exploratory celiotomy. Inclusion in the study group required

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association