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, arthrocentesis was performed bilaterally on the carpal and stifle joints. The collected synovial fluid appeared to have normal viscosity but was white and turbid. Although synovial protein concentration was not assessed, cytologic evaluation revealed many

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

was set to P < .05, at the 95% CI. Arthrocentesis Synovial fluid samples were obtained by an experienced veterinarian using a 1-inch, 20G needle attached to a 5-mL syringe and using aseptic technique following surgical preparation of the skin

Open access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

the limb held and the carpus flexed. The joint capsule was penetrated at a depth of approximately 1.3 cm. Arthrocentesis of the fetlock joint was performed with the limb in flexion and the needle inserted into the lateral aspect of the palmar pouch

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

, ultrasound-guided liver biopsy, abdominocentesis, arthrocentesis, thoracocentesis, cystocentesis, and performing hand ties with suture material) and asked to indicate (on a scale from 0 to 4, where 0 = I expect no conceptual working knowledge of the procedure

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

SUMMARY

The antebrachiocarpal and tarsocrural joints of 10 adult horses were randomly assigned to 1 of 4 groups. Groups were formulated and were treated as follows: group 1, control (arthrocentesis only); group 2, buffered lactated Ringer solution; group 3, 10% dimethyl sulfoxide (dmso; w/v) in lactated Ringer solution; and group 4, 30% dmso (w/v) in lactated Ringer solution. Joints were lavaged once with the respective solution. Prior to lavage and on days 1, 4, and 8 after lavage, all horses were evaluated for lameness and joint effusion; synovial fluid total and differential wbc counts, synovial fluid total protein concentration, and mucin clot quality were determined. Horses were euthanatized on day 8, and joints were evaluated grossly, histologically, and histochemically.

Significant difference was not observed in effect of lactated Ringer solution, 10% dmso, and 30% dmso on any measured variable. At 24 hours after treatment, significant (P < 0.05) difference in synovial fluid wbc numbers and total protein concentration was detected between control and treated joints. Eighty percent of lavaged joints had effusion 24 hours after treatment, compared with 30% of control joints.

Gross, histopathologic, or histochemical differences were not detected between treated and control joints. Results of the study indicate that buffered lactated Ringer, 10% dmso, and 30% dmso solutions induce similar inflammatory changes in articular structures and significantly greater inflammatory reaction than does arthrocentesis alone.

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate anticollagen type I antibodies in synovial fluid of the affected stifle joint, the contralateral stifle joint, and the left shoulder joint of dogs with unilateral cranial cruciate ligament (CrCL) rupture during an extended period of 12 to 18 months.

Animals—13 client-owned dogs with CrCL rupture and 2 sham-operated dogs.

Procedures—All dogs were examined and arthrocentesis of all 3 joints was performed every 6 months after surgery. Synovial fluid samples were tested for anticollagen type I antibodies by use of an ELISA.

Results—Dogs with partial CrCL rupture had higher antibody titers than dogs with complete rupture. Six of 13 dogs ruptured the contralateral CrCL during the study, whereby higher antibody titers were found for the stifle joints than for the shoulder joint. Seronegative dogs or dogs with extremely low antibody titers and 2 dogs with high antibody titers did not sustain a CrCL rupture in the contralateral stifle joint.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—In most dogs that had a CrCL rupture of the contralateral stifle joint, a distinct antibody titer gradient toward the stifle joints was detected, suggesting that there was a local inflammatory process in these joints. However, only a small number of sham-operated dogs were used to calculate the cutoff values used to determine the anticollagen type I antibody titers in these patients. Synovial fluid antibodies against collagen type I alone do not initiate CrCL rupture because not all dogs with high antibody titers sustained a CrCL rupture in the contralateral stifle joint.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine absolute and relative cell counts for synovial fluid from grossly, radiographically, and histologically normal shoulder and stifle joints in healthy cats.

Design—Clinical study.

Animals—52 cats scheduled to be euthanatized for unrelated reasons.

Procedure—Arthrocentesis of the shoulder and stifle joints was performed bilaterally, and synovial fluid was analyzed for absolute WBC count, WBC morphology, and percentages of neutrophils and mononuclear cells. Joints were examined grossly and radiographically, and synovial membrane specimens were submitted for histologic examination. Synovial fluid samples that were contaminated with blood and samples from joints with any gross, radiographic, or histologic abnormalities were excluded.

Results—82 of the 208 synovial fluid samples were excluded because abnormalities were identified during physical examination; the volume of fluid obtained was insufficient for analysis; there was evidence of blood contamination; or the joint had gross, radiographic, or histologic abnormalities. Median WBC count for the remaining 126 synovial fluid samples was 91 cells/μL (96.4% mononuclear cells and 3.6% neutrophils); WBC count was not significantly different between left and right joint samples or between shoulder and stifle joint samples. Body weight was associated with synovial fluid WBC count, with WBC count increasing as body weight increased. Sixteen of the 52 (30%) cats had radiographic evidence of osteoarthritis involving at least 1 joint.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that synovial fluid can be obtained reliably from shoulder and stifle joints in cats. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2004;225:1866–1870)

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate clinical effects of immobilization followed by remobilization and exercise on the metacarpophalangeal joint (MPJ) in horses.

Animals—5 healthy horses.

Procedure—After lameness, radiographic, and force plate examinations to determine musculoskeletal health, 1 forelimb of each horse was immobilized in a fiberglass cast for 7 weeks, followed by cast removal and increasing amounts of exercise, beginning with hand-walking and ending with treadmill exercise. Lameness examination, arthrocentesis of both MPJ, single-emulsion radiographic examination, nuclear scintigraphic examination, ground-reaction force-plate analysis, and computed tomographic examination were done at various times during the study.

Results—All horses were lame in the immobilized MPJ after cast removal; lameness improved slightly with exercise. Force plate analysis revealed a significant difference in peak forces between immobilized and contralateral limbs 2 weeks after cast removal. Range of motion of the immobilized MPJ was significantly decreased, and joint circumference was significantly increased, compared with baseline values, during the exercise period. Osteopenia was subjectively detected in the immobilized limbs. Significant increase in the uptake of radionucleotide within bones of the immobilized MPJ after cast removal and at the end of the study were detected. Loss of mineral opacity, increased vascular channels in the subchondral bone, and thickening within the soft tissues of the immobilized MPJ were detected.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results indicate that 8 weeks of enforced exercise after 7 weeks of joint immobilization did not restore joint function or values for various joint measurements determined prior to immobilization. (Am J Vet Res 2002;63:282–288)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate effects of intra-articular and extracapsular reconstruction of the cranial cruciate ligament (CCL) on metabolism of articular cartilage as reflected by concentrations of chondroitin sulfate epitopes 3B3 and 7D4 in synovial fluid.

Animals—13 adult dogs.

Procedure—Each dog underwent unilateral CCL transection (CCLT). One month after CCLT, sham CCL reconstruction (3 dogs), intra-articular CCL reconstruction (5), or extracapsular CCL reconstruction (5) was performed. Synovial fluid was collected by direct arthrocentesis from CCLT and contralateral stifle joints immediately before (time 0) and 1, 3, and 5 months after CCLT. Fluid was examined for concentrations of 3B3 and 7D4 epitopes and total sulfated glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content.

Results—Concentrations of 3B3, 7D4, and GAG, 3B3:GAG, or 7D4:GAG in CCLT joints did not differ significantly among treatment groups nor in the ratios of these variables in CCLT joints to contralateral joints at 3 months. In a longitudinal analysis, concentrations of 3B3 and 7D4, 3B3:GAG, and 7D4:GAG in CCLT joints in all groups changed significantly with time, but we did not detect time X group interactions.

Conclusion and Clinical Relevance—Transection of CCL resulted in significant perturbation in articular cartilage metabolism as reflected by alterations in concentrations of 3B3 and 7D4 in synovial fluid. These changes over time were not significantly influenced by method of CCL reconstruction. We did not find evidence that surgical stabilization of CCL-deficient joints by intra-articular or extracapsular techniques had any effect on preventing alterations in composition of synovial fluid that have been associated with secondary osteoarthritis. (Am J Vet Res 2001;62:581–587)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate in vivo activityin dogs of meloxicam or aspirin, previously shown in vitro to be a selective cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitor (COX-1 sparing drug), or a nonselective COX inhibitor, respectively.

Animals—12 male dogs with unilateral osteoarthritis of the stifle joint.

Procedure—Each dog was treated in a crossover design with aspirin or meloxicam for 21 days. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) concentrations were measured at days 0 (baseline), 7, and 21 of each treatment period in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated blood, synovial fluid collected by arthrocentesis, and endoscopic gastric mucosal biopsy specimens. Thromboxane B2 (TXB2) was evaluated in blood on days 0, 7, and 21 of each treatment period.

Results—Aspirin administration significantly suppressed PGE2 concentrations in blood, gastric mucosa, synovial fluid, and suppressed TXB2 concentration in blood at days 7 and 21. Meloxicam administration significantly suppressed PGE2 concentrations in blood and synovial fluid at days 7 and 21, but had no effect on concentrations of TXB2 in blood or PGE2 in gastric mucosa. Suppression of LPS-stimulated PGE2 concentrations in blood and synovial fluid by aspirin and meloxicam administration is consistent with activity against the COX-2 isoenzyme. Suppression of concentrations of PGE2 in the gastric mucosa and TXB2 in blood by aspirin administration is consistent with activity against COX-1. Meloxicam, in contrast, had a minimal effect on functions mediated by COX-1.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Meloxicam acts in vivo in dogs as a COX-1 sparing drug on target tissues by sparing gastric PGE2 synthesis while retaining antiprostaglandin effects within inflamed joints. (Am J Vet Res 2002;63:1527–1531)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research