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SUMMARY

We compared the anesthetic combination of detomidine, ketamine, and halothane in control horses not undergoing apparently painful procedures with that in horses during arthroscopic surgery. The effectiveness of this regimen in suppressing neurologic response to surgery was, thus, evaluated. In this study, significant differences were not observed in electroencephalographic total amplitude, spectral edge, or beta-to-delta frequency ratio between surgically treated and nonsurgically treated (control) horses. On the basis of its attenuation of encephalographic responses, we conclude that detomidine (20 μg/kg of body weight, iv) and ketamine (2.2 mg/kg, iv) induction of anesthesia followed by maintenance with halothane is an effective regimen for control of pain in horses during arthroscopic surgery.

The insignificant frequency changes observed without any other signs of inadequate anesthesia or pain may indicate a surgical stress response. We hypothesize that brain activity monitoring may give an earlier index to initiation of surgically induced stress than do hormonal responses, because endocrine alterations are not as rapidly perceived as is the electroencephalogram. Analysis of spectral edge frequency changes could be used to evaluate anesthetic regimens to find those that cause the least stress to the cns during surgery in horses. Differences in species responses to an anesthetic agent or the regimen’s effectiveness in prevention of pain during surgery may be identified by adoption of the study model. Evaluation of cardiopulmonary variables during anesthesia, with and without surgery, did not reveal any alterations that would be relevant to cns responses. Blood pressure, heart rate, Pa O 2 , Pa CO 2 , and pH were stabilized by use of intermittent positive-pressure ventilation in all horses, and dobutamine was administered, as needed, to avoid bias of electroencephalogram data.

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

activity monitor to detect response to treatment in dogs with osteoarthritis Results of a new study suggest that an electronic activity monitor may be a valid tool for assessing the outcome of treatments designed to decrease chronic pain and improve

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

(assessed with a collar-mounted activity monitoring device c as previously described 28,30 ), changes in owner-selected impaired activities (assessed with the CSOM questionnaire 28 ), and owner-assessed patient QOL were the outcome measures of the study

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

activity and owner assessments of impairment. In the study, there was a significant increase in activity (measured with a collar-mounted activity monitor system) with the 2-mg/kg dosage of tramadol. Adverse events were dose dependent, and caution should be

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

dogs would be asked to attach a physical activity monitor to their dog's collar, which would measure their dog's regular activity. Owners would keep a log of special events, such as removal of the collar, and any technical difficulties that were

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

exercise of dogs enrolled in the present study were determined by an owner questionnaire. The use of activity monitors would have increased the precision of these data and validated responses on the owners' questionnaire. Activity monitors have been used to

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

treatments were performed during underwater treadmill sessions. Owner compliance regarding diet, exercise, and use of the activity monitor was recorded by 1 author (SSO) at each time point, therapy session, or both for each dog. These results were recorded

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

conflicts with other measurements that can affect typical physical activity, voluntary physical activity was measured at weeks 0, 6, 12, and 18 by use of activity monitors e that were attached to neck collars for a 7-day measurement period at each time

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

lying and standing behaviors (99.2% and 98%, respectively) that can prove to be difficult to assess with conventional methods. Investigators in previous studies have implemented accelerometer-based activity monitoring systems in several animal species

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

saline (0.9% NaCl) solution at induction of general anesthesia result in greater activity monitor counts over the 24 hours immediately following surgery, controlling for age and baseline activity? Now, the control group is specified, the purpose of

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association