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masses or nodules along with a bronchial infiltrate. 3 Other radiographic findings in cats with pulmonary metastasis include ill-defined pulmonary nodules, alveolar infiltrates, and pleural effusion. 4 Evaluation of thoracic radiographs of the cat in

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

pleural effusion. An area of increased radiolucency without visibility of vessels in the right hemithorax was consistent with unilateral pneumothorax and subsequent atelectasis of the right lung lobes. These findings were consistent with a closed right

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

considered less likely. Mild peritoneal effusion was deemed the most likely cause of the linear region of fluid attenuation ventral to the mass; however, mild concurrent peritonitis, steatitis, or, less likely, peritoneal metastasis could not be definitively

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

peritoneal effusion. These changes were most consistent with neoplasia (differential diagnosis of carcinoma or less likely round cell) causing a chronic partial mechanical obstruction. Mild nonspecific hyperechoic hepatomegaly was also noted. Figure 3

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

short stride with an arched back during movement (lameness grade, 1 2/5). Also, in the right hind limb, the tarsus (hock) was diffusely warm to the touch and the tibiotarsal joint had marked effusion. Results of flexion tests on the right hind limb

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

appeared radiographically normal, and there was no evidence of pleural effusion, caudal vena caval dilation, hepatomegaly, or decreased peritoneal serosal detail, which, if present, would have suggested right-sided congestive heart failure. Figure 2

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

scale and often worsened when exercised. 1 On physical evaluation, there was no palpable joint effusion or soft tissue swelling in any limb. The patient had a positive response to hoof testers on the left forelimb sole, most evident on the medial solar

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

was swollen with palpable carpal joint effusion. The horse had a left forelimb lameness and was mildly lame at the walk and severely lame at the trot (4/5 lameness score, on the basis of the American Association of Equine Practitioners scale). 1 Left

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

bite wounds of the thoracic wall include subcutaneous emphysema, pulmonary hemorrhage, pneumothorax, rib separation or fracture, and, in many instances, a combination of these signs. 3,4 Other radiographic signs may include pleural effusion, pulmonary

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

decreased visualization of the intra-abdominal serosa, suggesting a mass effect, effusion, peritonitis, or emaciation. Other organs could not be evaluated because of the mass effect and decreased serosal detail. The included osseous structures were

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association