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intestinal segments. However, abdominal effusion developed in the postoperative period and septic peritonitis was diagnosed following abdominocentesis on the basis of findings on cytologic examination of peritoneal fluid. The patient was euthanatized because

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

tomography, were declined by the owner. The cause of the loss of abdominal detail was not further pursued, but abdominal ultrasonography could have been helpful in determining whether this was associated with the enlarged spleen or peritoneal effusion in the

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

airway disease. The cardiac silhouette is uniformly enlarged with a vertebral heart score of 9.5 (reference limit, < 8.1 for cats). This may be caused by primary cardiac disease or pericardial effusion. Figure 2— Same radiographic images as in

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

the right thoracic limb. There was firm swelling at the distal aspect of the right antebrachium and on the medial aspect of the right stifle joint. The right stifle joint had palpable synovial effusion. Findings of a CBC and serum biochemical analysis

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

moderate amount of echogenic peritoneal effusion was present on ultrasonographic examination. Multiple hyperechoic focal echogenicities with strong distal shadowing were present in the urinary bladder, confirming cystic calculi. A concave defect on the left

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

lymphadenopathy, interstitial or miliary lung infiltration, localized lung consolidation, or pleural effusion. Abdominal radiography may reveal hepatomegaly or splenomegaly, abdominal masses, mineralized mesenteric lymph nodes, or ascites. Bone lesions tend to

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

reference limits. The horse was estimated to be approximately 90 kg (200 lb) underweight (body condition score, 3/9). Mild synovial effusion was detected in the carpal and tarsal joints and all digital flexor sheaths. A coarse, grade 4 of 6 systolic

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

by use of an 8- to 5-MHz microconvex array transducer and a 15- to 7-MHz linear transducer. A large volume of echogenic effusion is present throughout the mid to caudal aspect of the coelom ( Figure 3 ). Associated with the cranial aspect of the left

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

fracture with pseudoarthrosis. The soft tissue swelling was most compatible with edema or hemorrhage, possibly with some amount of joint effusion or, less likely, septic inflammation. Because of its smooth contours and even spacing from the basilar part of

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

left cranial lung lobe, or soft tissue mass associated with the rib lesion and secondary pleural effusion. Primary differential diagnoses included rib neoplasia versus pleural neoplasia, abscess, or granuloma. Although much less likely, a lung lobe

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association