Search Results

You are looking at 101 - 110 of 387 items for :

  • "osteomyelitis" x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All

the bone is a frequent sequela. Although various bacterial species including Pseudomonas spp 7 have been cultured in spinal lesions, spinal osteomyelitis is most often associated with Salmonella spp, particularly Salmonella enterica subsp

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

of the articular epiphyseal cartilage complex (arrowheads). The deeper subchondral bone (III) is affected by multifocal to coalescing osteomyelitis (accumulation of neutrophils and fibrin; not visible at 20X magnification). A region of granulation

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

vertebrae at the level just cranial to the vent. Possible origins for these 2 lesions included bone or nerve tissues (spinal cord, meninges, or nerve roots), with differential diagnoses of neoplasia and osteomyelitis. The snake's lungs had low volume but

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

consistent with multifocal, severe diskospondylitis with osteomyelitis, severe meningitis, myelitis, myositis, cellulitis, and compressive empyema at the level of L1 and L2. Infected soft tissues and disk herniation causing spinal cord compression at T13-L1

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
Authors and

premolar tooth has 3 roots. Retained root tips and endodontic disease of the adjacent teeth were ruled out. 1,2 Although no radiographic signs of osteomyelitis were observed, acute osteomyelitis could not be ruled out because acute osteomyelitis may

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

adventitia was infiltrated by abundant macrophages admixed with a few heterophils. Bar = 20 μm. C—Osteomyelitis, os palatinum, skull; H&E stain. The marrow cavity of os palatinum (dashed circle) was occupied by inflammatory cells. Bar = 500 μm. D—Osteomyelitis

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

For the past 30 years, antimicrobial-impregnated polymethylmethacrylate implants have been used in the treatment and prevention of osteomyelitis. 1,2 Such materials have offered some success for local drug delivery. However, the effect of the

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

valuable insight into how to manage these challenging fractures. In rabbits, the surgical management of odontogenic abscess with secondary osteomyelitis is formidable and, to date, only case reports are published on the treatment and prognosis of these

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

tissue changes along the neck in cross-sectional planes; a CBC to assess for evidence of inflammation or infection; microbial cultures of blood and urine samples to assess for bacterial infection resulting in osteomyelitis; and biopsy of any affected

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

mobility and appetite. Lateral thoracic radiography had revealed lytic changes without periosteal reaction to the pedicle and the lamina of the T11 vertebra ( Figure 1 ). Despite treatment for suspected diskospondylitis or osteomyelitis, the cat developed

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association