Search Results

You are looking at 101 - 110 of 1,928 items for :

  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All

Summary

Arthroscopy was performed in 1 carpal joint unilaterally in 27 horses and either in 2 carpal joints unilaterally or 1 carpal joint bilaterally in 7 horses. All horses were lame, but the cause of lameness could not be determined from radiographs. Twenty-seven carpi did not have radiographically visible abnormalities; the remaining 14 had only mild to moderate lucency or sclerosis of the radial facet of the third carpal bone. The primary abnormalities identified during arthroscopy included a crush fracture of the third carpal bone (7 carpi), an incomplete fracture of the third carpal bone in the frontal plane (13 carpi), an incomplete fracture of the third carpal bone in the sagittal plane (1 carpus), a crush fracture of the radial carpal bone (1 carpus), a chip fracture of the intermediate carpal bone (1 carpus), damage to the articular cartilage of the third carpal bone (12 carpi), tearing or fraying of the medial palmar intercarpal ligament (4 carpi), and synovitis (2 carpi).

All of the horses in this study were racehorses (29 Standardbreds and 5 Thoroughbreds), and race records were used to evaluate performance before and after surgery. Twenty-four of 34 horses raced preoperatively, and 25 of 34 raced postoperatively. Twenty-three of the 27 (85%) horses in which a single joint was examined raced postoperatively. Fifteen of these horses had an incomplete or crush fracture of the radial facet of the third carpal bone, and 13 raced postoperatively; 7 horses had full- or partial-thickness damage of cartilage of the third carpal bone, and all 7 raced postoperatively; 2 horses had partial or complete rupture of the medial palmar intercarpal ligament, and both raced postoperatively.

Fifteen horses with either a frontal plane incomplete fracture, crush fracture, or full-thickness damage of cartilage of the third carpal bone in 1 carpus were treated by removing bone and cartilage from the dorsoproximal margin of the third carpal bone; 13 of these horses raced postoperatively. Both horses with incomplete frontal plane fractures of the third carpal bone repaired with screws raced postoperatively.

Only 2 of 6 horses that underwent bilateral carpal arthroscopy raced postoperatively; 1 of these horses had bilateral partial tearing of the medial palmar intercarpal ligament; the other had bilateral frontal plane incomplete fractures of the radial facet of the third carpal bone. The remaining horse, in which both the radiocarpal and middle carpal joints were examined, did not race postoperatively

Our results suggest that horses with lameness, the cause of which has been localized to the carpus, in which radiographs are not diagnostic are likely to have an underlying abnormality that can be effectively diagnosed and treated via arthroscopy. Arthroscopy allows the examiner to thoroughly explore the joint, make an accurate diagnosis, and make the best decision regarding treatment.

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine the clinical, radiographic, ultrasonographic, and arthroscopic findings associated with tenosynovitis of the carpal synovial sheath induced by exostoses that originate from the caudal surface of the physeal scar of the distal radius and determine the results of surgical removal of those exostoses in horses.

Design—Retrospective study.

Animals—10 horses.

Procedure—Medical records of horses with effusion in the carpal synovial sheath and lameness evaluated from 1999 to 2003 were examined.

Results—All horses had a history of intermittent mild to moderate effusion of the carpal synovial sheath and lameness of 1 forelimb. Results of regional perineural and intrathecal anesthesia of the carpal synovial sheath confirmed that the lameness originated in the carpal synovial sheath. Radiography revealed exostoses originating from the caudal cortex of the distal radius at the level of the closed physis. Arthroscopy was performed for confirmation and removal of exostoses that penetrated the carpal synovial sheath and impinged on the deep digital flexor tendon. All horses returned to previous athletic activity. One horse had a recurrence of clinical signs 12 months after surgery, which resolved with medical treatment.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Tenosynovitis of the carpal synovial sheath and lameness were caused by impingement of exostoses of the caudal radius on the lining and contents of the carpal synovial sheath. Although the clinical signs and surgical treatment were similar to that caused by osteochondromas, these exostoses developed at the level of the closed physis of the distal radius and were not radiographically or histologically similar to osteochondromas. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2004;224:264–270)

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

History A 4-year-old 38.4-kg castrated male Labrador Retriever–Poodle cross was presented to Texas A&M University’s Small Animal Emergency Service because of left thoracic limb lameness. The dog was initially presented to another emergency

Open access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine incidence, risk factors, and heritability estimates of hind limb lameness caused by hip dysplasia in a birth cohort of Boxers.

Animals—1,733 Boxers from 325 litters.

Procedure—Status of Boxers with respect to clinical signs of canine hip dysplasia (cCHD) was registered during an 8-year period. Survival analysis accounted for dogs lost to follow-up. Effective heritability for developing cCHD was estimated by use of a proportional hazard model on the basis of the Weibull distribution. Parametric survival models were developed to identify the influence of potential risk factors.

Results—Cumulative hazard rate for cCHD from 7 weeks to 8 years of age was 8.5%. Dogs that were kept on a floor covered with a slippery material were 1.6 times as likely to develop cCHD, compared with dogs kept on a nonslippery floor. Risk of cCHD doubled in dogs from litters with a high preweaning mortality rate. Dogs that were neutered at 6 months prior to a diagnosis of CHD were 1.5 times as likely to develop cCHD, compared with sexually intact dogs. Dogs > 5 years of age were 1.8 times as likely to develop cCHD, compared with younger dogs. Estimated effective heritability of cCHD was 0.11. In terms of the risk of cCHD in progeny, mean estimated breeding value (EBV) of the 10 best and 10 worst sires was –0.32 and 0.42, respectively.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Registration of Boxers that develop cCHD may provide a strategy for disease prevention. In addition to diagnostic evaluation of radiographs, sire EBVs provide useful information for breeding selection decisions. (Am J Vet Res 2005;66:307–312)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

History A 1.5-year-old 24-kg intact female German Shepherd Dog presented to the primary veterinarian for a history of lameness and swelling on the lateral aspect of the right antebrachium. The dog was initially administered a tapering anti

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

In the report “Effects of repetition within trials and frequency of trial sessions on quantitative parameters of vertical force peak in horses with naturally occurring lameness” ( Am J Vet Res 2016;77:756–765), the first sentence under the

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

since 1 year of age and a 1-month history of lameness on the left thoracic limb, with no other significant health history. The cough was previously managed with oral maropitant for around 1 year. The patient was an indoor-outdoor cat, was up to date on

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

In the report “Effects of intrabursal administration of botulinum toxin type B on lameness in horses with degenerative injury to the podotrochlear apparatus” ( Am J Vet Res 2014;75:282–289), Dr. Matthew C. Stewart, BVSc, PhD, should be added to

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To monitor the effect of focused extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) on bone and bone-tendon junction of horses without lameness by use of nuclear scintigraphy and thermography.

Animals—6 warmblood horses without lameness.

Procedure—The origin of the suspensory ligament at the metacarpus (OSL-MC) and the fourth metatarsal bone were treated at 2 time points (days 0 and 16) with 2,000 shocks applied by a focused ESWT device at an energy flux density of 0.15 mJ/mm2. One forelimb and 1 hind limb were treated, and the contralateral limbs served as controls. To document the effect of focused ESWT, nuclear scintigraphy was performed on days -1, 3, 16 (before second ESWT), and 19. Thermography was performed on days -1, 0 (1 hour after first ESWT), 1, 3, 8, 16 (twice; before and 1 hour after second ESWT), and 19. On days 3, 16 (first scans), and 19, thermography was performed before scintigraphy.

Results—Scintigraphically, significant variations in radiopharmaceutical activity at the OSL-MC were detected in treatment and control limbs. No significant differences, however, in mean temperature or radiopharmaceutical activity could be detected by use of thermography or nuclear scintigraphy, respectively, between the treatment and control limbs at any time point in response to ESWT.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—After 2 treatments of focused ESWT, no physiologic effect on the studied structures could be demonstrated by use of nuclear scintigraphy or thermography. Results of this study indicate that at currently used ESWT settings, no damage to the bone or bone-tendon junction should occur. (Am J Vet Res 2005;66:1836–1842)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

shoulder region, with a discharging tract over the area cranial to the fossa supraspinata. When trotted in a straight line, the horse had right forelimb lameness grade 3 on a scale from 0 (no lameness) to 5 (minimal weight bearing or inability to move

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association