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effusion are evident. Structures within the thoracic cavity appear radiographically normal ( Figure 2 ). Differential diagnoses for a chronic wound with these clinical and radiographic signs included abscess, penetrating radiolucent foreign body with

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

diagnosing the presence of ascarids in horses as described in this report. Furthermore, the observation of free ascarids in the small intestine lumen and peritoneal cavity, combined with the large amount of echogenic abdominal effusion, was consistent with

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

middle lung lobe, and striated soft tissue opacity overlying the right sixth rib ( Figure 2 ). A diffuse bronchial and unstructured interstitial pulmonary pattern was noticed, and there was no evidence of pleural effusion. Skeletal findings (eg

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

abdominal mass effect, gas distension of the stomach and small intestines, peritoneal effusion, and pneumoperitoneum. 3–6 In the dog of the present report, liver lobe torsion or necrosis was considered to be one of the differentials for the

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

. A moderate amount of gas is present in the stomach (arrowhead; A and B). The thymus (asterisk; A) is a clinically normal finding in such a young dog and should not be mistaken for pleural effusion. A primary differential diagnosis for the dog

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

transverse plane (proton density [PD] and short tau inversion recovery [STIR]), sagittal plane (PD, STIR, and T1-weighted 3-D fast frequency echo [3-D FFE]), and dorsal plane (PD, STIR, and 3-D FFE). On MRI, joint effusion and synovial thickening were evident

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

, dyspnea, tachypnea, weight loss, vomiting, and anorexia). Complications of a chronic diaphragmatic hernia include strangulation of abdominal organs (eg, stomach, liver, small intestines, omentum, pancreas, and spleen), pleural effusion, lung lobe torsions

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

the thoracostomy tube, 152 mL of serosanguinous pleural effusion was removed, and over the next 2 days, the volume of pleural effusion decreased. Therefore, the thoracostomy tube was removed. Histologic evaluation of the mass revealed no evidence of

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

cystocentesis. The differential diagnosis list for the decreased serosal detail included fluid (eg, effusion [a pure transudate or an inflammatory or neoplastic modified transudate or exudate], hemorrhage, bile, chyle, or urine), a lack of intra

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

mediastinum was more likely than diffuse mediastinal effusion. Coursing dorsal to the trachea was a thin lucent line, consistent with a dorsally displaced esophageal lumen. It was unclear whether deviation of the esophageal lumen was solely because of

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association