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intolerance, hyporexia, and lethargy. Two years prior, the dog had incomplete excision of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the ungual process of distal phalanx on the fourth digit of the right pelvic limb, and more recently, the dog had splenic torsion

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Introduction A 12-year-old 5.66-kg male green iguana ( Iguana iguana ) was referred with a history of left hind limb monoparesis and recurrent squamous cell carcinoma of the right hind limb femoral pores. A right hind limb mass had been first

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

commonly reported neoplasms associated with the bladder include squamous cell carcinoma and transitional cell carcinoma. 7 Squamous cell carcinomas are overrepresented and carry a worse prognosis. 7 As was the case for the mare of the present report

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

squamous cell carcinoma that had expanded the mucosa of the esophagus, infiltrated the esophageal submucosa and muscularis layers, focally invaded into and through the diaphragm, and superficially invaded into the liver. There were frequent keratin pearls

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

pancytokeratin. AE1/AE3 pancytokeratin–specific immunohistochemical reaction; bar = 200 µm. Morphologic Diagnosis and Case Summary Morphologic diagnosis and case summary: gastric squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) in the first gastric compartment wall of

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

likely causes of the lesions on the penis and prepuce of this stallion and the unilaterally large scrotum? Please turn the page . Answer The most likely differential diagnoses for the penile lesions include squamous cell carcinoma, sarcoids, and

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

nerve III (oculomotor nerve). Etiologic diagnosis —Differential diagnoses considered for a lesion causing signs of peripheral cranial neuropathy in a dog included several neoplasms (ie, squamous cell carcinoma [SCC], adenocarcinoma, lymphoma, and

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

squamous cell carcinoma in cats, sheep, horses, and cattle. 10 In dogs, especially in breeds with short hair and light-colored skin, development of cutaneous hemangiomas and hemangiosarcomas has also been linked to sunlight exposure. 1 In young, indoor

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

neoplasms, most commonly squamous cell carcinoma. 2–13 Although clinical PDT is still considered an investigational cancer treatment in veterinary medicine, it is efficacious for most of the tumor types treated. 14,15 For various reasons, including lack

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

). Comments On the basis of gross inspection, chronic juvenile ossifying fibroma, osteoma, fibrous dysplasia, squamous cell carcinoma, oral papilloma, myxoma, myxofibrosarcoma, and exuberant granulation tissue should be considered as differential diagnoses

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association