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Abstract

Objective—To examine characteristics of cats and their owners with regard to outdoor access of owned cats.

Design—Cross-sectional study.

Animals—184 owned cats admitted to a veterinary referral center for nonemergency health concerns.

Results—Cats acquired recently were less likely to be allowed outdoors than those acquired during previous years. Outdoor access was often limited during the day; few owners allowed their cats to remain outdoors at night. Cats acquired from shelters were more likely to be kept exclusively as indoor pets than those cats acquired as strays. The presence of dogs but not other cats in the household was associated with increased outdoor access. Age, health status, and onychectomy status were not significantly associated with outdoor access. Cats allowed outdoor access were more likely to have been bitten by other cats.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—The basis for an owner's decision to allow outdoor access appears to be multifactorial, and there may be regional differences in outdoor access of owned cats. Acquisition source is associated with outdoor access of owned cats. Availability of information regarding outdoor access of cats may influence decision making. Educational efforts targeted at specific groups of cat owners, as well as programs that acknowledge owner beliefs regarding quality of life for their cats, may help to address the health, safety, and population concerns associated with outdoor access of owned cats. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2003;222:15417–1545)

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To identify radiographic abnormalities associated with degenerative lumbosacral stenosis (DLSS) in German Shepherd Dogs (GSDs) and determine whether specific radiographic abnormalities could be used to identify dogs at risk of developing DLSS.

Design}Cohort study.

Animals—33 GSDs working as police dogs.

Procedures—Results of physical, neurologic, and orthopedic examinations were used to identify dogs with DLSS. Survey radiography of the lumbosacral junction was performed, and radiographs were compared with radiographs obtained 3 years earlier.

Results—DLSS was diagnosed in 15 of the 33 (45%) dogs. Thirteen of the 15 dogs with DLSS and 14 of the 18 dogs without DLSS had radiographic abnormalities of the lumbosacral junction. Twenty-two (67%) dogs were able to perform unrestricted duties, including 3 dogs with suspected DLSS. Six (18%) dogs had been excluded from active duty during the period of surveillance because of DLSS. Significant progression in specific clinical and radiographic signs was detected, but multiple logistic regression analysis did not identify any radiographic signs that could be used to predict the development of DLSS.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggested that survey radiography cannot be used to predict development of DLSS in working GSDs.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

SUMMARY

Objective

To determine how long serum concentrations of ω-3 fatty acids remain elevated after cessation of dietary fish oil supplementation.

Animals

12 healthy Beagles.

Procedure

Baseline serum concentrations of linoleic acid, linolenic acid, arachidonic acid (AA), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) were measured. Dogs were then fed a diet supplemented with soybean oil or fish oil for 8 weeks, and serum fatty acid concentrations were measured while dogs were fed the experimental diets and for 18 weeks after they were switched to a maintenance diet.

Results

For dogs fed the fish oil diet, serum EPA and DHA concentrations were significantly increased by week 1 and remained increased for 7 (DHA concentration) or 3 (EPA concentration) weeks after dietary fish oil supplementation was discontinued.

Conclusions

In dogs, supplementation of the diet with fish oil may have effects for several weeks after dietary supplementation is discontinued.

Clinical Relevance

Studies of the effects of fish oil supplementation that use a crossover design should allow for an appropriate washout period. (Am J Vet Res 1998;59:864–868)

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

. References 1. Dernell WS Ehrhart NP Straw RC , et al. Tumors of the skeletal system . In: Withrow SJ Vail DM , eds. Withrow and MacEwen's small animal clinical oncology . 4th ed. St Louis : Saunders Elsevier , 2007 ; 540 – 582 . 2

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

of dogs with malignant lymphoma . J Am Vet Med Assoc 1998 ; 213 : 985 – 990 . 15. Chun R Garrett LD Vail DM . Cancer chemotherapy . In: Withrow and MacEwen's small animal clinical oncology . 4th ed. Withrow SJ Vail DM , eds

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

lymph node metastasis in dogs with OMM or OSCC. ABBREVIATIONS MLN Mandibular lymph node MRLN Medial retropharyngeal lymph node OMM Oral malignant melanoma OSCC Oral squamous cell carcinoma VSSO Veterinary Society of Surgical Oncology

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine the maximum tolerated dose and characterize the pharmacokinetic disposition of an orally administered combination of docetaxel and cyclosporin A (CSA) in dogs with tumors.

Animals—16 client-owned dogs with metastatic or advanced-stage refractory tumors.

Procedures—An open-label, dose-escalation, singledose, phase I study of docetaxel administered in combination with a fixed dose of CSA was conducted. Docetaxel (at doses of 1.5, 1.625, or 1.75 mg/kg) and CSA (5 mg/kg) were administered concurrently via gavage twice during a 3-week period. Plasma docetaxel concentrations were quantified by use of high-performance liquid chromatography, and pharmacokinetic disposition was characterized by use of noncompartmental analysis. Dogs' clinical signs and results of hematologic and biochemical analyses were monitored for evidence of toxicosis.

Results—No acute hypersensitivity reactions were observed after oral administration of docetaxel. Disposition of docetaxel was dose independent over the range evaluated, and pharmacokinetic variables were similar to those reported in previous studies involving healthy dogs, with the exception that values for clearance were significantly higher in the dogs reported here. The maximum tolerated dose of docetaxel was 1.625 mg/kg. Gastrointestinal signs of toxicosis were dose limiting.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—The absence of myelosuppression suggested that the docetaxelCSA combination may be administered more frequently than the schedule used. Further studies are warranted to evaluate combination treatment administered on a biweekly schedule in dogs with epithelial tumors.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate response rate and duration of malignant melanomas in dogs treated with carboplatin.

Design—Retrospective study.

Animals—27 client-owned dogs with spontaneously occurring measurable malignant melanomas.

Procedure—Records of dogs with melanomas treated with carboplatin from October 1989 to June 2000 were reviewed. Carboplatin was administered IV at doses of 300 or 350 mg/m2 of body surface area. Response to treatment and evidence of drug toxicity were determined.

Result—Response to treatment could be evaluated in 25 dogs. Of those, overall response rate was 28%. One dog had a complete response, 6 (24%) dogs had a partial response (> 50% reduction in tumor burden). Median duration of partial response was 165 days. Eighteen dogs had stable disease (n = 9; 36%) or progressive disease (9; 36%). Response to treatment was significantly associated with carboplatin dose on a milligram per kilogram basis (15.1 mg/kg [6.9 mg/lb] of body weight vs 12.6 mg/kg [5.7 mg/lb]). Evidence of gastrointestinal toxicosis could be assessed in 27 dogs. Mean body weight of 5 dogs that developed gastrointestinal toxicosis was significantly less than that of 22 dogs without gastrointestinal toxicosis (9.9 kg [21.8 lb] vs 19.3 kg [42.5 lb]).

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Carboplatin had activity against macroscopic spontaneously occurring malignant melanomas in dogs and should be considered as an adjunctive treatment for microscopic local or metastatic tumors. Gastrointestinal toxicosis was associated with body weight. Because small dogs are more likely to have adverse gastrointestinal effects, gastrointestinal protectants should be considered for these patients. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2001;218:1444–1448)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

to useful size (0.2 g) in only 7 days, resulting in minimal tumor-related disease. Recently, researchers at the University of Florida Comparative Oncology Laboratory investigated the in vitro radiosensitivity of canine osteosarcoma cells. 23 Through

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

services, to have been cited at least 68 times. These are only 2 examples of how outdated references continue to be cited in the veterinary oncology literature, primarily because the literature has not been updated with newer, more accurate epidemiological

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association