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Summary

Six nontrained mares were subjected to steady-state, submaximal treadmill exercise to examine the effect of exercise on the plasma concentration of atrial natriuretic peptide (anp) in arterial, compared with mixed venous, blood. Horses ran on a treadmill up a 6° grade for 20 minutes at a speed calculated to require a power equivalent to 80% of maximal oxygen uptake (Vo 2MAX). Arterial and mixed venous blood samples were collected simultaneously from the carotid and pulmonary arteries of horses at rest and at 10 and 20 minutes of exercise. Plasma was stored at − 80 C and was later thawed; anp was extracted, and its concentration was determined by radioimmunoassay. Exercise caused significant (P < 0.05) increases in arterial and venous plasma anp concentrations. Mean ± sem arterial anp concentration increased from 25.2 ± 4.4 pg/ml at rest to 52.7 ± 5.2 pg/ml at 10 minutes of exercise and 62.5 ± 5.2 pg/ml at 20 minutes of exercise. Mean venous anp concentration increased from 24.8 ± 4.3 pg/ml at rest to 67.2 ± 14.5 pg/ml at 10 minutes of exercise and 65.3 ± 13.5 pg/ml at 20 minutes of exercise. Significant differences were not evident between arterial or mixed venous anp concentration at rest or during exercise, indicating that anp either is not metabolized in the lungs or is released from the left atrium at a rate matching that of pulmonary metabolism.

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Summary

Six untrained mares were subjected to incremental treadmill exercise to examine exercise-induced changes in plasma renin activity (pra) and plasma aldosterone (aldo) and plasma arginine vasopressin (avp) concentrations. Plasma renin activity, aldo and avp concentrations, and heart rate (hr) were measured at each step of an incremental maximal exercise test. Mares ran up a 6° slope on a treadmill set at an initial speed of 4 m/s. Speed was increased 1 m/s each minute until hr reached a plateau. Plasma obtained was stored at − 80 C and later was thawed, extracted, and assayed for pra and aldo and avp values by use of radioimmunoassay. Exercise caused significant increase in hr from 40 ± 2 beats/min (mean ± sem) at rest to 206 ± 4 beats/min (hr max) at speed of 9 m/s. Plasma renin activity increased from 1.9 ± 1.0 ng/ml/h at rest to a peak of 5.2 ± 1.0 ng/ml/h at 9 m/s, paralleling changes in hr. Up to treadmill speed of 9 m/s, strong linear correlations were obtained between exercise intensity (and duration) and hr (r = 0.87, P < 0.05) and pra (r = 0.93, P < 0.05). Heart rate and pra reached a plateau and did not increase when speed was increased from 9 to 10 m/s. Plasma aldo concentration increased from 48 ± 16 pg/ml at rest to 191 ± 72 pg/ml at speed of 10 m/s. Linear relation was found between exercise intensity (and duration) and aldo concentration (r = 0.97, P < 0.05). Plasma avp concentration increased from 4.0 ± 3.0 pg/ml at rest to 95 ± 5.0 pg/ml at speed of 10 m/s. The relation between avp concentration and exercise intensity (and duration) appeared to be curvilinear, and was described by an exponential function (r = 0.92, P < 0.05). These data indicate that pra and aldo and avp concentrations increase in horses during progressive treadmill exercise.

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

SUMMARY

Changes in clotting time (ct) and fibrinolytic actvity (fa) were evaluated in 6 mature, female horses during exercise. Two trials were performed on consecutive days, using a randomized crossover design. Each mare was assigned to either an exercise trial or a control trial on the first day, and to the alternate trial 24 hours later. Mares exercised for 20 minutes on a treadmill at an elevation of 2° and a velocity of 5 m/s. Venous blood samples were collected immediately before exercise, at 4, 8, 12, 16, and 20 minutes during exercise, and 15 minutes after cessation of exercise. Blood was placed into plain glass tubes for determination of CT, and into chilled, citrated tubes for determination of FA, plasminogen/plasmin complex activity (plg), one-stage prothrombin time (ospt), activated partial thromboplastin time (aptt), and antithrombin-III (at-III) activity. There were significant differences (P < 0.05) between the control and exercise groups for ct, fa, and plg. During exercise, clotting time decreased from 21.5 ± 1.6 minutes to 9.9 ± 1.6 minutes (mean ± sd; P < 0.05), without significant changes in ospt, aptt, or at-III. Fibrinolytic activity and plg increased (P < 0.05) during exercise. Changes in ct, fa, and plg were significant at 4 minutes of exercise, remained altered until the end of exercise, and returned to baseline values by 45 minutes of recovery. Clotting time, ospt, aptt, fa, at-III, and plg did not change (P > 0.05) during control trials.

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective

To describe changes in blood constituents of horses after oral and IV administration of sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3), and to determine whether the changes are dose dependent.

Animals

6 adult Standardbred mares.

Procedure

3 oral doses (1,500, 1,000, and 250 mg/kg of body weight) or 1 intravenous dose (250 mg/kg, 5% solution) of NaHCO3 in 3 L of water, or water (3 L orally), were given to the mares; then changes in blood constituents were measured. Access to food and water was denied during the experiment. Blood samples were collected immediately before treatment and at hourly intervals for 12 hours after treatment, and were analyzed for blood gas tensions; serum osmolality; serum sodium, potassium, chloride, and creatinine concentrations; PCV; and total solids concentration in plasma.

Results

All NaHCO3 treatments induced significant (P < 0.05) metabolic alkalosis, hypernatremia, hypokalemia, and hyperosmolality for at least 8 hours. In mares given the 1,500- and 1,000-mg doses of NaHCO3 orally, hypercapnia persisted for at least 12 hours, whereas hypercapnia lasted 2 hours in mares given the 250-mg dose orally or IV (P < 0.05). A tendency for reduction in PCV, proteins in plasma concentration, and serum concentration of chloride was observed 1 hour after IV administered doses of NaHCO3.

Conclusions

Oral or IV administration of NaHCO3 (≥ 250 mg/kg) to resting horses without ad libitum access to water induces significant and persistent acidbase and electrolyte changes. (Am J Vet Res 1997;58:658–663)

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objectives

To describe changes in renal function of horses after oral and IV administration of sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) and to determine whether changes are dose dependent.

Animals

6 Standardbred mares.

Procedure

Blood and urine samples for determination of renal function were collected immediately before and at hourly intervals for 12 hours after administration of each of 3 oral doses (1,500, 1,000, and 250 mg/kg of body weight, in 3 L of water) and 1 IV dose (250 mg/kg, 5% solution) of NaHCO3, or water (3 L orally).

Results

NaHCO3 induced increases in urine flow; electrolyte-free water reabsorption; urine concentrations of sodium and bicarbonate; fractional excretion of sodium, potassium, chloride, and bicarbonate; urinary excretion and clearance of sodium and bicarbonate; urine pH and anion gap; and mean plasma concentration of antidiuretic hormone. NaHCO3 induced attenuation in reduction with time of urine excretion and clearance of potassium, chloride, and osmoles, and induced reduction in urine osmolality. Plasma aldosterone and atrial natriuretic peptide concentrations and glomerular filtration rate were not modified.

Conclusions

Renal responses to NaHCO3 load emphasize conservation of plasma volume and re-establishment of acid-base balance over control of hyperosmolality by means of diuresis, natriuresis, and increased bicarbonaturia. These responses imply a large fluid shift from the extravascular space to the vascular compartment, which was eliminated via diuresis, thus preventing hypervolemia. (Am J Vet Res 1997;58:664–671)

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To assess changes in muscle glycogen (MG) and triglyceride (MT) concentrations in aerobically conditioned sled dogs during prolonged exercise.

Animals—54 Alaskan sled dogs fed a high-fat diet.

Procedures—48 dogs ran 140-km distances on 4 consecutive days (cumulative distance, up to 560 km); 6 dogs remained as nonexercising control animals. Muscle biopsies were performed immediately after running 140, 420, or 560 km (6 dogs each) and subsequently after feeding and 7 hours of rest. Single muscle biopsies were performed during recovery at 28 hours in 7 dogs that completed 560 km and at 50 and 98 hours in 7 and 6 dogs that completed 510 km, respectively. Tissue samples were analyzed for MG and MT concentrations.

Results—In control dogs, mean ± SD MG and MT concentrations were 375 ± 37 mmol/kg of dry weight (kgDW) and 25.9 ± 10.3 mmol/kgDW, respectively. Compared with control values, MG concentration was lower after dogs completed 140 and 420 km (137 ± 36 mmol/kgDW and 203 ± 30 mmol/kgDW, respectively); MT concentration was lower after dogs completed 140, 420, and 560 km (7.4 ± 5.4 mmol/kgDW; 9.6 ± 6.9 mmol/kgDW, and 6.3 ± 4.9 mmol/kgDW, respectively). Depletion rates during the first run exceeded rates during the final run. Replenishment rates during recovery periods were not different, regardless of distance; only MG concentration at 50 hours was significantly greater than the control value.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Concentration of MG progressively increased in sled dogs undergoing prolonged exercise as a result of attenuated depletion.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective

To investigate the effect of combined staphylectomy and laryngotomy on upper airway mechanics in clinically normal horses running on a treadmill.

Animals

6 Standardbreds.

Procedure

Upper airway mechanics were measured with horses trotting or pacing on a treadmill at 5, 8, and 10 m/s before and 6 weeks after combined staphylectomy and laryngotomy. Pharyngeal and tracheal inspiratory and expiratory pressure were measured by use of transnasal tracheal and pharyngeal side hole catheters connected to differential pressure transducers. A pneumotachograph mounted on the rostral end of an airtight face mask was used to measure airflow.

Results

Upper airway and translaryngeal inspiratory impedances were higher, respiratory rate was decreased, and inspiratory time was longer (P < 0.05) at all speeds after staphylectomy and laryngotomy.

Conclusion

Combined staphylectomy and laryngotomy significantly affects upper airway mechanics in clinically normal horses.

Clinical Relevance

Because combined staphylectomy and laryngotomy exerts a potentially adverse effect on upper airway mechanics in clinically normal horses, the procedure should only be performed when it is clearly indicated. (Am J Vet Res 1997;58:1018–1021)

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

SUMMARY

Objective

To measure energy expenditures of Alaskan sled dogs at rest and during racing under frigid conditions, using the doubly labeled water (DLW) technique.

Animals

18 fit Alaskan sled dogs.

Procedure

Energy expenditure was measured in 9 dogs during a 490-km sled dog race by use of the DLW technique, whereby dogs were administered water enriched with nonradioactive isotopes of hydrogen and oxygen. Energy intake was determined by dietary analysis. Changes in background abundance of the isotopes 2H and 18O were monitored in 5 dogs that did not receive isotope-enriched water.

Results

Dogs completed the 490-km race at an average speed of 7 km/h at ambient temperature of −35 to −10 C. Total energy expenditure, measured by the DLW technique, was 47,100 ± 5,900 kJ/d (4,400 ± 400 kJ·kg-0.75/d), and metabolizable energy intake was 44,600 kJ/d (4,100 kJ·kg-0.75/d) during the 70-hour race.

Conclusions

The sustained metabolic rate for these sled dogs during racing was extraordinarily high for a large mammal. This study validated use of the DLW technique in dogs with exceptionally high energy expenditure associated with prolonged exercise in the cold. (Am J Vet Res 1997;58:1457–1462)

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective

To determine effects of walking or standing on hepatic blood flow of horses after brief, intense exercise.

Animals

6 adult Thoroughbreds (4 mares, 2 geldings).

Procedure

Horses were preconditioned on a treadmill to establish uniform level of fitness. Once fit, treadmill speed causing each horse to exercise at 120% of maximal oxygen consumption was determined and used in simulated races at 14-day intervals. In a three-way crossover study, horses were exercised at a speed inducing 120% of maximal oxygen consumption until fatigued or for a maximum of 2 minutes. Three interventions were studied: resting on the treadmill (REST), exercised then standing on the treadmill for 30 minutes (MS), and exercised then walking at 2 m/s for 30 minutes (MW). At 60 seconds after completion of exercise, bromsulphalein (BSP) was infused IV, and blood samples were collected every 2 minutes for 30 minutes for analysis of BSP concentration. Hematocrit and plasma total solids concentration were measured. Pharmacokinetic parameters were derived, using nonlinear regression, and were compared, using Friedman’s repeated measures analysis on ranks.

Results

Plasma BSP concentration was higher after exercise. Median hepatic blood flow (BSP clearance) decreased significantly from 23.8 (REST) to 20.7 (MS) and 18.7 (MW) ml/min/kg. Median steady-state volume of distribution of BSP decreased from 47.6 (REST) to 42.7 (MW) and 40.2 (MS) ml/kg. Differences among trials were not significant when horses walked or stood after exercise.

Conclusions

Hepatic blood flow and pharmacokinetics of BSP are markedly altered immediately after exercise. Limiting movement of horses during this period did not affect hepatic blood flow. (Am J Vet Res 1998;59:1476–1480)

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine whether prolonged exercise by conditioned sled dogs affects urine concentrations of homovanillic acid (a metabolite of dopamine), vanillylmandelic acid (a metabolite of norepinephrine and epinephrine), and cortisol.

Animals—24 conditioned Alaskan sled dogs (2 to 8.5 years old) that were in training for a multiday endurance race.

Procedures—Voided urine samples were collected from 4 groups of dogs (randomly selected from 54 dogs) after no exercise (control group; n = 6 dogs), completion of a 160km run (group A; 3), completion of a 420-km run (group B; 7), and completion of a 560-km run (group C; 6). Urine cortisol concentrations were determined by use of an immunoassay technique; urine vanillylmandelic acid and homovanillic acid concentrations were measured via high-performance liquid chromatography.

Results—Compared with the control group, urine cortisol concentration in groups A, B, and C was significantly different (5.33 × 10−4 ± 2.62 × 10−4 μg/dL vs 1.04 × 10−4 ± 2.31 × 10−5 μg/dL, 8.88 × 10−4 ± 5.49 × 10−4 μg/dL, and 6.31 × 10−4 ± 5.09 × 10−4 μg/dL, respectively). Urine homovanillic acid concentration did not differ among the 4 groups. Vanillylmandelic acid was not detected in any urine samples.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results indicated that prolonged exercise by sled dogs did not affect urine homovanillic acid concentration but did increase urinary cortisol secretion, which is indicative of adrenocortical stimulation. The apparent lack of vanillylmandelic acid in voided urine samples requires further investigation.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research