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Abstract

Objective—To evaluate efficacy and safety of using an electrothermal, feedback-controlled, bipolar sealing device (BSD) for resection of the elongated portion of the soft palate in brachycephalic dogs with upper airway obstruction.

Design—Uncontrolled clinical trial.

Animals—24 brachycephalic dogs with airway obstruction and elongated soft palate.

Procedures—In all dogs, the excess portion of the soft palate was resected with a BSD. A score for severity of clinical signs of respiratory tract obstruction was assigned before surgery, during the first 24 hours after surgery, and at the time of final follow-up 12 to 23 months after surgery. Potential scores ranged from 0 (no clinical signs even with moderate to vigorous activity) to 4 (agonal breathing or severe cyanosis).

Results—None of the dogs died or developed life-threatening complications after surgery. Clinical scores after surgery (mean ± SD, 0.3 ± 0.6) and at the time of final follow-up (0.9 ± 0.5) were significantly lower than preoperative scores (2.6 ± 0.8).

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results indicated that a BSD can be safely used for resection of the elongated portion of the soft palate in brachycephalic dogs with upper airway obstruction.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To compare blood pressure measured noninvasively with an oscillometric device that involved use of a novel conical cuff and a traditional cylindrical blood pressure cuff.

ANIMALS 17 adult hound-type dogs.

PROCEDURES Dogs were anesthetized, and a 20-gauge, 1.5-inch catheter was inserted in the median sacral artery. The catheter was attached to a pressure transducer via fluid-filled noncompliant tubing, and direct blood pressure was recorded with a multifunction monitor. A specially fabricated conical cuff was placed on the antebrachium. Four sets of direct and indirect blood pressure measurements were simultaneously collected every 2 minutes. Four sets of measurements were then obtained by use of a cylindrical cuff.

RESULTS The cylindrical cuff met American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine consensus guidelines for validation of indirect blood pressure measurements for mean arterial blood pressure (MAP), systolic arterial blood pressure (SAP), and diastolic arterial blood pressure (DAP). The conical cuff met the consensus guidelines for difference of paired measurements, SD, and percentages of measurements within 10 and 20 mm Hg of the value for the reference method, but it failed a correlation analysis. In addition, although bias for the conical cuff was less than that for the cylindrical cuff for SAP, MAP, and DAP measurements, the limits of agreement for the conical cuff were wider than those for the cylindrical cuff for SAP and MAP measurements.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE On the basis of results of this study, use of a conical cuff for oscillometric blood pressure measurement cannot be recommended.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To determine whether directly measured arterial blood pressure differs among anatomic locations and whether arterial blood pressure is influenced by body position.

ANIMALS 33 client-owned dogs undergoing anesthesia.

PROCEDURES Dogs undergoing anesthetic procedures had 20-gauge catheters placed in both the superficial palmar arch and the contralateral dorsal pedal artery (group 1 [n = 20]) or the superficial palmar arch and median sacral artery (group 2 [13]). Dogs were positioned in dorsal recumbency, and mean arterial blood pressure (MAP), systolic arterial blood pressure (SAP), and diastolic arterial blood pressure (DAP) were recorded for both arteries 4 times (2-minute interval between successive measurements). Dogs were positioned in right lateral recumbency, and blood pressure measurements were repeated.

RESULTS Differences were detected between pressures measured at the 2 arterial sites in both groups. This was especially true for SAP measurements in group 1, in which hind limb measurements were a mean of 16.12 mm Hg higher than carpus measurements when dogs were in dorsal recumbency and 14.70 mm Hg higher than carpus measurements when dogs were in lateral recumbency. Also, there was significant dispersion about the mean for all SAP, DAP, and MAP measurements.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results suggested that arterial blood pressures may be dependent on anatomic location and body position. Because this may affect outcomes of studies conducted to validate indirect blood pressure measurement systems, care must be used when developing future studies or interpreting previous results.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate indications for and factors relating to outcome after rumenotomy or rumenostomy in cattle.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—95 cattle that underwent rumenotomy or rumenostomy.

Procedures—Medical records for 95 cattle that underwent either rumenostomy or rumenotomy at 2 veterinary teaching hospitals in 1999 through 2011 were analyzed. Reasons for the procedures were noted. Long-term outcome was determined during telephone interviews with owners.

Results—42 (44%) bovids underwent rumenostomy and 53 (56%) bovids underwent rumenotomy. Among the 42 animals undergoing rumenostomy, 18 (43%) had rumen cannulas placed during elective procedures. Other indications for rumenostomy included ruminal tympany (bloat [n = 20]), esophageal obstruction (choke [1]), grain overload (1), and provision of access for administration of enteral nutrition (2). Indications for rumenotomy included traumatic reticuloperitonitis (n = 31), bloat (9), foreign body (6), choke (5), and other (2). Long-term follow-up data were available for 31 of 42 (74%) bovids that underwent rumenostomy. Of those 31 animals, 17 (55%) were still in the herd, 4 (13%) had been culled, and 10 (32%) had died or were euthanized. Long-term follow-up data were available for 38 of 53 (72%) bovids that underwent rumenotomy. Of those 38 animals, 13 (34%) were still in the herd, 14 (37%) had been culled, and 11 (29%) had died or been euthanized.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results indicated that rumenotomy and rumenostomy can be effective in treating or relieving complications secondary to forestomach disorders in cattle. Bovids undergoing rumen surgery had a favorable prognosis for survival and a fair prognosis for potential return to production.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

The aim of this study was to investigate whether plasma neurofilament light chain (pNfL) concentration was altered in Labrador Retrievers with idiopathic laryngeal paralysis (ILP) compared to a control population. A secondary aim was to investigate relationships between age, height, weight, and body mass index in the populations studied.

ANIMALS

123 dogs: 62 purebred Labrador Retrievers with ILP (ILP Cases) and 61 age-matched healthy medium- to large-breed dogs (Controls).

METHODS

Dogs, recruited from August 1, 2016, to March 1, 2022, were categorized as case or control based on a combination of physical exam, neurologic exam, and history. Blood plasma was collected, and pNfL concentration was measured. pNfL concentrations were compared between ILP Cases and Controls. Covariables including age, height, and weight were collected. Relationships between pNfL and covariables were analyzed within and between groups. In dogs where 2 plasma samples were available from differing time points, pNfL concentrations were measured to evaluate alterations over time.

RESULTS

No significant difference in pNfL concentration was found between ILP Cases and Control (P = .36). pNfL concentrations had moderate negative correlations with weight and height in the Control group; other variables did not correlate with pNfL concentrations in ILP Case or Control groups. pNfL concentrations do not correlate with ILP disease status or duration in Labrador Retrievers.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

There is no evidence that pNfL levels are altered due to ILP disease duration or progression when compared with healthy controls. When evaluating pNfL concentrations in the dog, weight and height should be considered.

Open access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research