Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 8 of 8 items for

  • Author or Editor: Terry L. Blanchard x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All Modify Search
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Summary

Postoperative performance and behavioral patterns were investigated retrospectively in 23 client-owned mares after bilateral ovariectomy via colpotomy. The interval from surgery to postoperative inquiries ranged from 9 to 67 months. Information obtained from review of the medical record and client interviews included the reason for ovariectomy, postoperative complications, problems identified by owners after discharge of the mare from the hospital, postoperative level of athletic performance, postoperative signs of estrus, and overall owner satisfaction. Reasons given by owners for having mares ovariectomized were behavioral modification (16 mares), use as embryo-transfer recipients (3 mares), use as mount mares for collecting semen (2 mares), elimination of chronic colic during estrus (1 mare), and sterilization for registration (1 mare). Postoperative complications developed in 4% (1/23) of the mares; however, problems were noticed by the owners of 4 other mares after discharge from the hospital. Continuing signs of behavioral estrus were detected in 35% (8/23) of the mares, but in only in 9% (2/23) was the behavior judged to be objectionable by the owner. Of 12 mares used in performance events prior to bilateral ovariectomy, 10 were judged to be competing at greater than preoperative levels, 1 was judged to be competing at the same level, and 1 was judged to be competing at less than preoperative level of performance. Of 18 owners, 14 were satisfied, 2 were undecided, and 2 were dissatisfied with their mare after it had had bilateral ovariectomy.

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Objective

To compare effects of 3 oxytocin-based induction techniques on fetal and neonatal foals.

Design

Prospective randomized controlled trial.

Animals

16 pregnant mares.

Procedure

Parturition was induced in mares by use of 3 treatments: group 1, 75 U of oxytocin, IM; group 2, 15 U of oxytocin, IM, q 15 minutes, for a maximum of 75 U; group 3, 75 U of oxytocin in 1 L of 0.9% NaCI solution, IV (1 U/min), for a maximum of 75 U. Blood gas values and indices of vitality were measured in foals, and variables describing parturition were measured in mares.

Results

Group-3 mares had a shorter interval from administration of oxytocin to rupture of the chorioallantois (OTCA) than group-2 mares. More foals were abnormal when the interval from oxytocin administration to delivery of the foal (OTDE) was ≥ 60 minutes, Arterial blood gas values, measurements of vitality, and plasma cortisol concentrations did not differ among foals in various treatment groups. Increased interval for OTCA and OTDE resulted in higher neonatal Paco2 , and a longer interval for OTCA resulted in lower arterial pH. Time required for birth was shorter in mares with a dilated cervix. More abnormal foals than normal foals were delivered after premature placental separation or dystocia. Abnormal foals took longer to stand and suckle than normal foals. Interval from delivery to suckling was positively correlated with OTCA, OTDE, and Paco2 .

Clinical Implications

Method of oxytocin-induced parturition did not impact neonatal outcome. Interval from induction until parturition, degree of cervical dilatation, and intrapartum complications influenced induction success. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1997; 210:799–803

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine whether administration of killed West Nile virus vaccine was associated with pregnancy loss among broodmares.

Design—Retrospective cohort study.

Animals—595 mares.

Procedure—Records of pregnant mares with known vaccination history from 4 farms were reviewed. Information obtained from 595 mares included mare's identification; farm; age; breed; reproductive status; last breeding date; date last known pregnant; vaccination date; age of conceptus at vaccination; vaccination during the early embryonic, early fetal, and late fetal periods; and whether an early embryonic death (EED), early fetal loss (EFL), or late fetal loss (LFL) occurred. The relationships between the dichotomous outcomes of loss (eg, EED, EFL, LFL) and independent categoric variables (eg, vaccination during the early embryonic, early fetal, or late fetal periods) were examined.

Results—Vaccination of pregnant mares during any period of gestation was not associated with increased incidence of pregnancy loss.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Many mares are already pregnant at the onset of mosquito season, when mares are more likely to be vaccinated than at other times. Our findings provide evidence that vaccine administration will not compromise pregnancy in horses. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2004;225:1894–1897)

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine features of an early fetal loss (EFL) syndrome and evaluate potential risk factors for EFL in Thoroughbred broodmares on 4 farms in central Kentucky.

Design—Retrospective study.

Animals—288 pregnant broodmares.

Procedure—Year-2001 breeding records for 288 Thoroughbred broodmares were examined. Early fetal loss was defined as loss of a fetus that was viable at ≥ 40 days of gestation but was subsequently lost by 5 months of gestation.

Results—Overall 2001 EFL rate was 25% (73/288), median gestational age at time of fetal loss was 77 days, and median date of loss was May 7. Mares on 1 farm had significantly fewer fetal losses (5%) than mares on the other 3 farms (26 to 35%). Fetal losses were higher for maiden (42%) and barren (42%) mares than for foaling mares (18%). Fetal losses were greater in young than in older mares. Effects of broodmare farm, mare age, and reproductive status were all significant. Fetal losses were not associated with sire used for mating or stud farm.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Greatest risk for EFL occurred during the period from late April to May (ie, in mares bred during February through March). Higher incidence of EFL in maiden and barren mares and lower incidence of EFL on 1 farm suggest management or environmental influences may have affected outcome. Risk factors that should be investigated include environmental differences among farms and differences in management procedures used for lactating versus nonlactating mares. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2002;220:1828–1830)

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association