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  • Author or Editor: Susan A. McLaughlin x
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Summary

Clinical findings indicate that canine eyes tolerate implantation of polymethylmethacrylate (pmma) intraocular lenses (iol) well, although inflammation and ocular damage attributable to the implants is not known. The use of silicone or polyhydroxyethylmethacrylate (hema) iol has not been reported in dogs. In this study, 15 conditioned, mixed-breed dogs were allotted to 3 groups: 5 received pmma iol; 5 received silicone iol; and 5 received hema iol. The iol optic was inserted into the anterior chamber of the right eye and anchored to the cornea. An identical surgical procedure was done on the left eye, except that no lens optic was inserted. Clinical examination and measurement of corneal thickness were done immediately prior to and after surgery. Aqueous humor samples were collected at the time of surgery and 28 days after surgery. Only mild and transient inflammation was observed in iol-implanted eyes. On several postoperative days, it was found that pmma iol induced significantly greater corneal thickness, aqueous flare, anterior uveal irritation, and corneal edema than did other iol. Significantly more anterior uveal irritation and increased aqueous humor protein concentration was observed with hema iol than with pmma or silicone iol. Silicone iol induced significantly less fibrin deposition than did pmma or hema iol.

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Summary

Scanning electron microscopy was used to evaluate changes on the surfaces of polymethylmethacrylate (pmma), silicone, and polyhydroxyethylmethacrylate (hema) intraocular lenses (iol) that had been implanted in the anterior chambers of the right eyes of 15 dogs. Five dogs received pmma iol; 5 dogs received silicone iol; and 5 dogs received hema iol. Twenty-eight days after surgery, the iol were removed and processed for scanning electron microscopy. Nonimplanted iol of each type were processed identically for comparison. Implanted pmma iol had significantly more debris and macrophages on their surfaces than did silicone iol or hema iol. Silicone iol had significantly less fibrin deposition than did pmma or hema iol. Silicone iol had surface defects attributable to handling by surgical instruments. Implanted hema iol had multiple pits that appeared to be caused by biodegradation.

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research