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  • Author or Editor: Munashe Chigerwe x
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Abstract

OBJECTIVE To characterize indications for and clinical outcomes of limb amputation in goats and sheep.

DESIGN Retrospective case series and observational study.

ANIMALS Goats (n = 15) and sheep (7) that underwent partial or complete limb amputation at the University of California-Davis Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital from January 1, 1985, through December 31, 2015.

PROCEDURES Medical records of qualifying goats and sheep were reviewed and data extracted regarding signalment, use of animal, characteristics of the amputated limb, duration of hospitalization, outcome, and surgery-associated complications. The Fisher exact test was performed to compare postsurgical complication rates between various groups.

RESULTS Reasons for limb amputation included trauma (ie, fracture, dog bite, and wire-fence injury) and infectious or degenerative disease (ie, osteomyelitis and osteoarthritis). Median (range) hospitalization period for goats and sheep was 7.5 days (1 to 63 days) and 8 days (3 to 20 days), respectively. Most (7/9) of the postsurgical complications were noticed > 2 months after amputation and included uncoordinated gait, tendon breakdown and laxity of the contralateral limb, chronic lameness, surgical site infection, chronic intermittent pain, and angular limb deformity. No association was identified between postsurgical complication rate in goats and body weight category (< 20 vs ≥ 20 kg [44 lb]), age category (< 2 vs ≥ 2 years), and amputated limb type (forelimb vs hind limb).

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Clinical outcomes for goats and sheep following limb amputation varied and were seemingly case dependent. Amputation should be considered when preservation of the whole limb is not possible. Veterinarians should advise owners that limb amputation may result in various complications and recommend aftercare treatment such as physiotherapy.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To describe disorders of performance-age bucking bulls.

DESIGN Retrospective case-control study.

ANIMALS 78 bucking (cases) and 236 nonbucking (controls) beef bulls.

PROCEDURES The medical record database of a referral hospital was reviewed to identify beef bulls > 1 year old that were examined for a medical or musculoskeletal disorder between January 1, 2000, and April 1, 2014. Bucking bulls were designated as cases, and nonbucking bulls were designated as controls. For each bull, the signalment, history, physical examination and diagnostic test results, and clinical diagnosis were recorded. The frequency of each disorder was compared between cases and controls.

RESULTS Fifteen of 78 (19%) cases and 132 of 236 (56%) controls had medical disorders; however, the frequency did not differ between the 2 groups for any medical disorder. Musculoskeletal disorders were identified in 55 (70.5%) cases and 109 (46%) controls. Cases were 10.55 times as likely as controls to have horn and sinus disorders. Of the 43 (55%) cases examined because of lameness, the thoracic limb was affected in 19 (44%). Compared with controls, cases were 13.37 and 3.31 times as likely to have a musculoskeletal disorder of the vertebral region and pelvic limb, respectively.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results indicated bucking bulls were more likely than nonbucking bulls to develop horn and sinus disorders and musculoskeletal disorders of the vertebral region and pelvic limbs. The limb distribution of lameness for bucking bulls may differ from that for nonbucking bulls.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To evaluate the usefulness of serum immunocrit measurement to detect failure of passively acquired immunity (FPI) in dairy calves.

DESIGN Diagnostic test evaluation.

ANIMALS 249 female dairy calves (age, 2 to 6 days).

PROCEDURES A blood sample was collected from each calf, and serum was harvested. Immunocrit was measured in serum samples by use of 55% ammonium sulfate solution and the standard technique. Serum IgG concentration was measured by means of radial immunodiffusion (reference standard), with FPI defined as a result < 1,000 mg/dL. The immunocrit value (cutpoint) that maximized both sensitivity and specificity of the method for detection of FPI was determined by construction of receiver operating characteristic curves, and likelihood ratios for positive and negative test results were calculated.

RESULTS Immunocrit values were significantly correlated (ρ = 0.71) with serum IgG concentration as measured by radial immunodiffusion. An immunocrit cutpoint of 11% was optimal for detection of FPI in the calves. Sensitivity and specificity of the immunocrit method at this cutpoint were 0.88 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.79 to 0.97) and 0.51 (95% CI, 0.44 to 0.58), respectively. Likelihood ratios for positive and negative test results were 1.80 (95% CI, 1.51 to 2.14) and 0.23 (95% CI, 0.11 to 0.51), respectively.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE The immunocrit method was useful for identifying dairy calves with FPI and was simple and could be quickly performed. Because precipitation of immunoglobulins by ammonium sulfate is not species specific, the immunocrit method should be evaluated for detection of FPI in other veterinary species as well.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To compare the apparent efficiency of absorption of IgG and failure of passive transfer of immunity rates between calves fed colostrum by nipple bottle (NB) and oroesophageal tubing (OET).

Design—Randomized controlled study.

Animals—26 Holstein bull calves (age, 4 to 8 hours).

Procedures—Calves were randomly assigned to receive colostrum by either NB or OET. Pooled colostrum was used for feeding each group of calves. Calves received either a maximum of 4 L of colostrum fed through an NB over a period of 20 minutes or an equivalent volume of colostrum fed by OET. Subsequently, a pair of similarly aged calves received similar volumes of colostrum with similar immunoglobulin concentrations. Colostrum was fed only once. Thereafter, calves were fed 2 L of milk replacer every 12 hours. All calves survived to at least 48 hours of age. Serum samples were collected prior to feeding colostrum and at 48 hours of age for determination of serum immunoglobulin concentrations.

Results—There were no differences in failure of passive transfer of immunity rates and apparent efficiency of absorption of IgG between calves fed by NB or OET. Volume of colostrum fed was the only significant variable in determining failure of passive transfer of immunity in calves at 48 hours.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Reported advantages and disadvantages of either feeding method are likely to be of minimal practical relevance in achieving adequate passive transfer of immunity in calves when calves are fed a similar volume of colostrum with comparable immunoglobulin concentrations.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine the prevalence of detectable serum IgG concentrations in calves prior to ingestion of colostrum and to assess whether a detectable IgG concentration was related to dam parity, calf birth weight, calf sex, season of calving, or infectious agents that can be transmitted transplacentally.

Animals—170 Holstein dairy calves.

Procedures—Serum samples were obtained from calves prior to ingestion of colostrum, and serologic testing for bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) and Neospora caninum was performed. Relative risk, attributable risk, population attributable risk, and population attributable fraction for calves with a detectable serum IgG concentration attributable to positive results for N caninum and BVDV serologic testing were calculated. Logistic regression analysis was used to determine whether dam parity, calf sex, season of calving, and calf weight were associated with precolostral IgG concentration.

Results—90 (52.9%) calves had a detectable total serum IgG concentration (IgG ≥ 16 mg/dL). Relative risk, attributable risk, population attributable risk, and population attributable fraction for calves with a detectable serum IgG concentration attributable to positive results for N caninum serologic testing were 1.66, 0.34, 0.014, and 0.03, respectively. Calf sex, calf birth weight, and season of calving were not significant predictors for detection of serum IgG in precolostral samples.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Prevalence of IgG concentrations in precolostral serum samples was higher than reported elsewhere. There was no apparent link between serum antibodies against common infectious agents that can be transmitted transplacentally and detection of measurable serum IgG concentrations.

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To evaluate the use of a percutaneous transabdominal catheter (PTC) for urinary bladder drainage in goats, sheep, and potbellied pigs with obstructive urolithiasis.

DESIGN Retrospective case series.

ANIMALS 43 goats, 10 sheep, and 16 potbellied pigs (all males) with obstructive urolithiasis evaluated at the University of California-Davis Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital.

PROCEDURES Medical records of goats, sheep, and potbellied pigs examined because of obstructive urolithiasis from January 2000 through December 2014 were reviewed. Records of animals for which a standard PTC had been placed into the urinary bladder as part of disease management were selected. Data were collected regarding signalment, complications associated with PTC placement, and duration of PTC placement prior to removal.

RESULTS 42 of 43 goats, 5 of 10 sheep, and all potbellied pigs were castrated. Median (range) duration of PTC placement was 2 (1 to 4) days for goats, 1 (1 to 4) day for sheep, and 1 (1 to 3) day for potbellied pigs. Complications associated with PTC placement included blockage of the catheter by urine sediment, perforation of the cecum, and migration of the catheter out of the urinary bladder.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Placement of a PTC into the urinary bladder allowed for effective stabilization of goats, sheep, and potbellied pigs with obstructive urolithiasis while acid-base and electrolyte imbalances were corrected. Use of a PTC should be considered for urinary bladder drainage during medical management or prior to surgical management of obstructive urolithiasis for these species.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To evaluate changes in systemic and ocular antibody responses of steers following intranasal vaccination with precipitated or partially solubilized recombinant Moraxella bovis cytotoxin (MbxA).

ANIMALS 13 Angus steers with ages ranging from 318 to 389 days and weights ranging from 352 to 437 kg.

PROCEDURES Steers were assigned to receive 500 μg of a precipitated (MbxA-P; n = 5) or partially solubilized (MbxA-S; 5) recombinant MbxA subunit adjuvanted with polyacrylic acid. A control group (n = 3) received the adjuvant alone. Each steer received the assigned treatment (1 mL/nostril) on days 0 and 28. Serum and tear samples were collected on days 0 (before vaccination), 14, 28, 42, and 55. Changes in MbxA-neutralizing antibody titers and MbxA-specific IgG concentrations in serum and tears and changes in MbxA-specific IgA concentrations in tears were measured.

RESULTS Mean fold changes in MbxA-specific IgG concentration in serum and tears and MbxA-neutralizing antibody titer in tears for the MbxA-P group were significantly greater than those for the MbxA-S and control groups. Mean serum MbxA-neutralizing antibody titer did not differ among the 3 groups. Although the mean fold change in tear MbxA-specific IgA concentration differed significantly among the groups in the overall analysis, post hoc comparisons failed to identify any significant pairwise differences.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Systemic and ocular immune responses induced by intranasal administration of the MbxA-P vaccine were superior to those induced by the MbxA-S vaccine. Additional research is necessary to determine whether the MbxA-P vaccine can prevent naturally occurring infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine the effect of timing of firstmilking colostrum collection on colostral IgG concentration.

Design—Prospective study.

Animals—13 healthy Holstein cows.

Procedures—All calvings were observed. After parturition, calves were not allowed to suckle and were separated from the dam. Colostrum was collected from a single randomly selected quarter at 2, 6, 10, and 14 hours after parturition until all 4 quarters were sampled. Colostral IgG concentration was determined via radial immunodiffusion.

Results—Mean colostral IgG concentration was 113, 94, 82, and 76 g/L at 2, 6, 10, and 14 hours after calving, respectively. Colostrum collected 6, 10, and 14 hours after calving had significantly lower IgG concentrations than did colostrum collected 2 hours after calving. Mean colostral IgG concentration at 14 hours after calving was significantly lower than that at 6 hours after calving. Cows in their third or greater lactation had mean colostral IgG concentrations 2 hours after calving (132 g/L) that were greater than the first and second lactation cows (mean, 95 and 100 g/L, respectively).

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results indicate that early or immediate colostrum collection from dairy cows will maximize colostral IgG concentration. Adjustment of routine dairy farm management procedures may be required to maximize colostrum quality and minimize prevalence of failure of passive transfer in dairy calves. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2005;226:1375–1377)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Case Description—A 13-year-old llama was examined because of lethargy, inappetence, and syncope.

Clinical Findings—Physical examination revealed muffled heart and lung sounds and peripheral edema. Clinicopathologic abnormalities included lymphopenia, hyperglycemia, prerenal azotemia, mild hyponatremia, mild hypoalbuminemia, and high γ-glutamyltransferase and creatine kinase activities. On ultrasonography, the liver appeared hyperechoic and ascites and pleural effusion were seen. Echocardiography revealed severe dilatation of the right atrium, right ventricle, and pulmonary artery; severe tricuspid regurgitation; and high right ventricular systolic pressure consistent with right-sided heart failure secondary to pulmonary hypertension.

Treatment and Outcome—Treatment with furosemide was attempted, but because of failing health, the llama was euthanized 4 weeks later. Macronodular cirrhosis of the liver, glomerulonephritis, and intimal fibrosis and medial hypertrophy of muscular pulmonary arteries were seen on histologic examination of postmortem specimens.

Clinical Relevance—Findings in this case were similar to those reported for human patients with portopulmonary hypertension secondary to hepatic cirrhosis. Pulmonary hypertension secondary to hepatic disease should be considered in the differential diagnosis of right-sided heart failure.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association