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  • Author or Editor: Jennifer L. Davis x
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Abstract

Objective—To determine the effect of protein binding on the pharmacokinetics and distribution from plasma to interstitial fluid (ISF) of cephalexin and cefpodoxime proxetil in dogs.

Animals—6 healthy dogs.

Procedures—In a crossover study design, 25 mg of cephalexin/kg or 9.6 mg of cefpodoxime/kg was administered orally. Blood samples were collected before (time 0) and 0.33, 0.66, 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 16, and 24 hours after treatment. An ultrafiltration device was used in vivo to collect ISF at 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 16, and 24 hours. Plasma and ISF concentrations were analyzed with high-pressure liquid chromatography. Plasma protein binding was measured by use of a microcentrifugation technique.

Results—Mean plasma protein binding for cefpodoxime and cephalexin was 82.6% and 20.8%, respectively. Mean ± SD values for cephalexin in plasma were determined for peak plasma concentration (Cmax, 31.5 ± 11.5 μg/mL), area under the time-concentration curve (AUC, 155.6 ± 29.5 μg•h/mL), and terminal half-life (T½, 4.7 ± 1.2 hours); corresponding values in ISF were 16.3 ± 5.8 μg/mL, 878 ± 21.0 μg•h/mL, and 3.2 ± 0.6 hours, respectively. Mean ± SD values for cefpodoxime in plasma were 33.0 ± 6.9 μg/mL (Cmax), 282.8 ± 44.0 μg•h/mL (AUC), and 5.7 ± 0.9 hours (T1/2); corresponding values in ISF were 4.3 ± 2.0 μg/mL, 575 ± 174 μg•h/mL, and 10.4 ± 3.3 hours, respectively.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Tissue concentration of protein-unbound cefpodoxime was similar to that of the protein-unbound plasma concentration. Cefpodoxime remained in tissues longer than did cephalexin.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To characterize pharmacokinetics of voriconazole in horses after oral and IV administration and determine the in vitro physicochemical characteristics of the drug that may affect oral absorption and tissue distribution.

Animals—6 adult horses.

Procedures—Horses were administered voriconazole (1 mg/kg, IV, or 4 mg/kg, PO), and plasma concentrations were measured by use of high-performance liquid chromatography. In vitro plasma protein binding and the octanol:water partition coefficient were also assessed.

Results—Voriconazole was adequately absorbed after oral administration in horses, with a systemic bioavailability of 135.75 ± 18.41%. The elimination half-life after a single orally administered dose was 13.11 ± 2.85 hours, and the maximum plasma concentration was 2.43 ± 0.4 μg/mL. Plasma protein binding was 31.68%, and the octanol:water partition coefficient was 64.69. No adverse reactions were detected during the study.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Voriconazole has excellent absorption after oral administration and a long half-life in horses. On the basis of the results of this study, it was concluded that administration of voriconazole at a dosage of 4 mg/kg, PO, every 24 hours will attain plasma concentrations adequate for treatment of horses with fungal infections for which the fungi have a minimum inhibitory concentration ≤ 1 μg/mL. Because of the possible nonlinearity of this drug as well as the potential for accumulation, chronic dosing studies and clinical trials are needed to determine the appropriate dosing regimen for voriconazole in horses.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine pharmacokinetics, safety, and penetration into interstitial fluid (ISF), polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNLs), and aqueous humor of doxycycline after oral administration of single and multiple doses in horses.

Animals—6 adult horses.

Procedure—The effect of feeding on drug absorption was determined. Plasma samples were obtained after administration of single or multiple doses of doxycycline (20 mg/kg) via nasogastric tube. Additionally, ISF, PMNLs, and aqueous humor samples were obtained after the final administration. Horses were monitored for adverse reactions.

Results—Feeding decreased drug absorption. After multiple doses, mean ± SD time to maximum concentration was 1.63 ± 1.36 hours, maximum concentration was 1.74 ± 0.3 μg/mL, and elimination half-life was 12.07 ± 3.17 hours. Plasma protein binding was 81.76 ± 2.43%. The ISF concentrations correlated with the calculated percentage of non-protein-bound drug. Maximum concentration was 17.27 ± 8.98 times as great in PMNLs, compared with plasma. Drug was detected in aqueous humor at 7.5% to 10% of plasma concentrations. One horse developed signs of acute colitis and required euthanasia.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that doxycycline administered at a dosage of 20 mg/kg, PO, every 24 hours will result in drug concentrations adequate for killing intracellular bacteria and bacteria with minimum inhibitory concentration ≤ 0.25 μg/mL. For bacteria with minimum inhibitory concentration of 0.5 to 1.0 μg/mL, a dosage of 20 mg/kg, PO, every 12 hours may be required; extreme caution should be exercised with the higher dosage until more safety data are available.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research