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  • Author or Editor: J. C. Thurmon x
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SUMMARY

Six healthy Holstein calves were anesthetized with isoflurane in O2 and instrumented for hemodynamic studies. A saphenous artery was catheterized for measurement of blood pressure and withdrawal of blood for determination of the partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PaCO2 ), oxygen (PaO2 ), and arterial pH (pHa). Respiration was controlled throughout the study. The ecg and eeg were monitored continuously. A thermodilution catheter was passed via the right jugular vein into the pulmonary artery for determination of cardiac output and measurement of central venous pressure, pulmonary arterial pressure, and pulmonary capillary wedge pressure. Baseline values (time 0) were recorded following recovery from isoflurane. Tiletamine-zolazepam (4 mg/kg)-xylazine (0.1 mg/kg) were administered iv immediately after recording baseline values. Values were again recorded at 5, 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, and 60 minutes after injection. Changes in left ventricular stroke work index, Paco2 , and pHa were insignificant. Arterial blood pressure and systemic vascular resistance increased above baseline at 5 minutes and then gradually decreased below baseline at 40 minutes, demonstrating a biphasic response. Values for pulmonary capillary wedge pressure, pulmonary arterial pressure, central venous pressure, and Pao2 were increased above baseline from 5 to 60 minutes. Stroke volume, stroke index, and right ventricular stroke work index were increased from 20 or 30 minutes to 60 minutes. Pulmonary vascular resistance increased at 10 minutes, returned to baseline at 20 minutes, and was increased again at 60 minutes. Heart rate, cardiac output, cardiac index, and rate pressure product were decreased at 5 minutes, and with the exception of cardiac output, remained so for 60 minutes. Cardiac output returned to the baseline value at 30 minutes. All calves recovered without complications. We concluded that tiletamine-zolazepam (4 mg/kg iv)-xylazine (0.1 mg/kg iv) is a safe and useful anesthetic regimen for use in calves.

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Summary

Plasma catecholamine concentrations in response to onychectomy were examined in 27 cats receiving different anesthetic regimens. Each cat was anesthetized with a dissociative-tranquilizer combination, and onychectomy was performed on 1 forefoot. One week later, each cat was anesthetized with the same dissociative-tranquilizer combination plus either butorphanol or oxymorphone, and onychectomy was performed on the other forefoot. Four treatment groups were studied: tiletamine-zolazepam and tiletamine-zolazepam-butorphanol combinations were administered to group-1 cats, ketamine-acepromazine and ketamine-acepromazine-butorphanol combinations were administered to group-2 cats, tiletamine-zolazepam and tiletamine-zolazepam-oxymorphone combinations were administered to group-3 cats, and ketamine-acepromazine and ketamine-acepromazine-oxymorphone combinations were administered to group-4 cats. All drug combinations were administered im. Central venous blood samples were drawn for catecholamine analysis after injection of drug(s), after onychectomy, and 1, 2, and 4 hours after injection. Tiletamine-zolazepam alone or tiletamine-zolazepam-butorphanol prevented epinephrine release for 2 hours after injection of drug(s). Norepinephrine concentration increased significantly (P < 0.05) from baseline after onychectomy for tiletamine-zolazepam-butorphanol and at 4 hours for tiletamine-zolazepam and tiletamine-zolazepam-butorphanol. After onychectomy, there was no difference in epinephrine values between tiletamine-zolazepam and tiletamine-zolazepam-oxymorphone. Ketamine-acepromazine prevented increases in norepinephrine and epinephrine concentrations for up to 2 hours after surgery. Addition of butorphanol to ketamine-acepromazine decreased norepinephrine values immediately after onychectomy. Addition of oxymorphone to ketamine-acepromazine resulted in lower epinephrine values 4 hours after surgery.

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

SUMMARY

The thiamylal sparing effect of midazolam was studied in 30 healthy Beagle and mixed-breed dogs. Using a replicated Latin square design, all dogs were given placebo (saline solution) and 0.025, 0.05, 0.1, and 0.2 mg of midazolam/ kg of body weight prior to iv administration of thiamylal sodium. The 0.1 and 0.2 mg/kg dosages significantly decreased the amount of thiamylal required to obtund swallowing reflex and easily achieve endotracheal intubation. Midazolam at 0.1 and 0.2 mg/kg reduced thiamylal requirement by 16.4% and 18.9%, respectively, whereas the 0.05 mg/kg dosage decreased thiamylal requirement by only 6.8%. The 0.2 mg/kg dosage did not further decrease thiamylal requirement beyond that achieved with the 0.1 mg/kg dosage of midazolam. This study demonstrates that the preanesthetic iv administration of midazolam reduces the thiamylal dose necessary to accomplish intubation. The optimal preanesthetic dosage (lowest dosage with significant effect) was 0.1 mg/kg.

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

SUMMARY

Pharmacokinetic variables of etomidate were determined after iv administration of etomidate (3.0 mg/kg of body weight). Blood samples were collected for 6 hours. Disposition of this carboxylated imidazole best conformed to a 2- (n = 2) and a 3- compartment (n = 4) open pharmacokinetic model. The pharmacokinetic values were calculated for the overall best-fitted model, characterized as a mixed 2- and 3-compartmental model. The first and most rapid distribution half-life was 0.05 hour and a second distribution half-life was 0.35 hour. Elimination half-life was 2.89 hours, apparent volume of distribution was 11.87 ± 4.64 L/kg, apparent volume of distribution at steady state was 4.88 ± 2.25 L/kg, apparent volume of the central compartment was 1.17 ± 0.70 L/kg, and total clearance was 2.47 ± 0.78 L/kg/h.

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Summary

Hemodynamic and analgesic effects of medetomidine (15 µg/kg of body weight, im) and etomidate (0.5 mg/kg, iv, loading dose; 50 µg/kg/min. constant infusion) were evaluated in 6 healthy adult Beagles. Instrumentation was performed during isoflurane/oxygen-maintained anesthesia. Before initiation of the study, isoflurane was allowed to reach end-tidal concentration ≤ 0.5%, when baseline measurements were recorded. Medetomidine and atropine (0.044 mg/kg) were given im after recording of baseline values. Ten minutes later, the loading dose of etomidate was given im, and constant infusion was begun and continued for 60 minutes. Oxygen was administered via endotracheal tube throughout the study. Analgesia was evaluated by use of the standard tail clamp technique and a direct-current nerve stimulator.

Sinoatrial and atrial-ventricular blocks occurred in 4 of 6 dogs within 2 minutes after administration of a medetomidine-atropine combination, but disappeared within 8 minutes. Apnea did not occur after administration of the etomidate loading dose. Analgesia was complete and consistent throughout 60 minutes of etomidate infusion. Medetomidine significantly (P < 0.05) increased systemic vascular resistance and decreased cardiac output. Etomidate infusion caused a decrease in respiratory function, but minimal changes in hemodynamic values. Time from termination of etomidate infusion to extubation, sternal recumbency, standing normally, and walking normally were 17.3 ± 9.4, 43.8 ± 14.2, 53.7 ± 11.9, and 61.0 ± 10.9 minutes, respectively. All recoveries were smooth and unremarkable. We concluded that this anesthetic drug combination, at the dosages used, is a safe technique in healthy Beagles.

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Summary

Hemodynamic and analgesic effects of medetomidine (30 μg/kg of body weight, im), atropine (0.044 mg/kg, im), and propofol (2 mg/kg, IV, as a bolus, and 165 μg/kg/min, Iv, for 60 minutes, as an infusion) were evaluated in 6 healthy adult Beagles. Catheters were placed while the dogs were anesthetized with isoflurane in oxygen. Administration of isoflurane was then discontinued, and dogs were allowed to breath oxygen until end-tidal isoflurane concentration was ≤ 0.5%. At this time, baseline measurements were recorded and medetomidine and atropine were administered. Ten minutes later, the bolus of propofol was given and the infusion was begun. Analgesia was evaluated with a tail clamp test and by use of a direct-current nerve stimulator. Sinoatrial and atrioventricular blockade developed in all 6 dogs within 2 minutes of administration of medetomidine and atropine, but disappeared within 10 minutes. Apnea did not develop after administration of propofol. Analgesia was strong and consistent throughout the entire 60-minute period of propofol infusion. Medetomidine significantly (P < 0.05) increased systemic vascular resistance and decreased cardiac output, compared with baseline values. Propofol infusion appeared to alleviate medetomidine induced vasoconstriction. Recovery was smooth and uncomplicated. All dogs were able to walk normally at a mean time (± sem) of 88.2 ± 20.6 minutes after termination of propofol infusion. It was concluded that medetomidine, atropine, and propofol, as given in the present study, is a safe combination of anesthetic drugs for use in healthy Beagles.

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research