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Abstract

Objective

To evaluate the histologic pattern and biomechanical properties of adhesions caused by chromic catgut and polypropylene sutures, using an enteropexy model.

Design

Enteropexies were created in dogs, using chromic catgut and polypropylene suture. The adhesions associated with the enteropexies were examined histologically and mechanically.

Animals

6 mixed-breed dogs weighing 16 to 20 kg.

Procedure

72 enteropexies were created between the jejunum and abdominal wall. 36 sites were sutured with chromic catgut, and 36 were sutured with polypropylene. 3 dogs were euthanatized after 1 week. The remaining dogs were euthanatized after 1 month. Samples of the enteropexy sites were obtained for histologic examination. The remaining sites were mechanically distracted until failure of the enteropexy site or adjacent tissue occurred.

Results

Histologic examination of the enteropexy sites did not reveal substantial differences in the degree of inflammation between the 2 suture types at 1 week or 1 month. The degree of inflammation decreased and the maturity of fibrous tissue formed at the enteropexy sites increased for all specimens over time. No statistically significant difference in breaking strength was observed between suture types at 1 week or 1 month.

Conclusion

In dogs, the formation and strength of intentionally created abdominal adhesions are not increased by use of chromic catgut.

Clinical Relevance

Selection of chromic catgut suture for use in surgical procedures where adhesions are desired is unwarranted. (Am J Vet Res 1996;57:943–947)

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

SUMMARY

The effects of 3 occlusive dressing materials and a standard, nonadherent dressing material on healing of full-thickness skin defects were evaluated in dogs. Two wounds measuring 2 × 2 cm were created bilaterally (4 wounds/dog) on the dorsolateral aspect of the trunk of 12 Beagles. Wound treatments were evenly distributed between 4 sites, using a Latin square design. Treatments evaluated were: equine amnion (group A), biosynthetic hydrogel dressing (group B), transparent polyethylene sheeting (group T), and a semiocclusive rayon/polyethylene, nonadherent dressing (group C). Rates of contraction and epithelialization of group-A wounds were significantly greater than those of wounds of groups C, B, and T. On days 14, 21, and 28, mean percentage of wound contraction and mean percentage of total wound healed in group A exceeded those wounds in groups C, B, and T. On day 28, wounds in group A were significantly smaller than wounds in groups B and T, but were not significantly smaller than wounds in group C. All wounds in group A achieved 100% healing during the 28-day study period. Mean time for complete healing of group-A wounds was 21 days. The percentages of wounds completely healed by day 28 for groups B, C, and T were 25, 67, and 25%, respectively. Results indicate that use of equine amnion as an occlusive biological dressing on full-thickness wounds in dogs increases rate of healing.

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

SUMMARY

Transcutaneous oxygen (PO2-TC) monitoring is commonly used in human medicine for evaluating skin viability. The application of transcutaneous monitoring for evaluating skin viability in dogs was investigated.

The changes in PO2-TC values were measured from 16 avascular skin flaps created along the lateral hemithoraces of 4 dogs. Transcutaneous oxygen values were serially recorded from the vascular base and avascular apex of each flap for 12 hours after surgery. A single transcutaneous measurement was obtained from each flap base and apex 24 hours after surgery. Serial arterial blood gas analyses were obtained to compare central oxygen values with PO2-TC values. Full-thickness skin biopsy specimens were harvested from the base and apex of each flap 24 hours after surgery. The flaps were observed for 4 days and then excised for histologic examination. A subjective grading scale was used to assess histologic changes.

Throughout the 12-hour period and at 24 hours, a statistically significant difference was found between the PO2-TC values for apices and bases of the flaps. The mean PO2-TC for all bases was 90.9 mm of Hg ± 3.3 SEM, and the mean PO2-TC for all apices was 21.2 mm of Hg ± 1.8 SEM. The mean regional perfusion index (apex PO2-TC/base PO2-TC) was 0.23 ± 0.02. The subjective numbers assigned to the biopsy specimens were statistically evaluated by using a paired Student's t test and a Wilcoxon signed-rank test. A significant difference was found between the numbers for the collective bases and apices with both tests. A statistically significant difference was found between the numbers for the apex biopsy specimens taken 24 hours after creation of the skin flap and those taken when the flap was excised, whereas no difference was found between the numbers for the base biopsy specimens. On the basis of our findings, PO2-tc monitoring is a useful technique for assessing skin viability in dogs.

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

SUMMARY

Transcutaneous oxygen monitoring is commonly used in human beings to assess skin viability. Little attention has been directed toward the use of transcutenaous carbon dioxide (PCO2-TC ) monitoring for the same purpose. The application of PCO2-TC monitoring for evaluating skin viability in dogs was investigated.

The changes in PCO2-TC and local power reference (LPR) values were measured from 16 skin flaps created along the lateral hemithoraces of 4 dogs. Transcutaneous PPCO2 and LPR values were serially recorded from the base and apex of each flap for 12 hours. A single measurement was obtained from each flap base and apex 24 hours after surgery. Arterial blood gas analyses were obtained to compare central PCO2 values with peripheral skin PCO2 values. The flaps were observed for 4 days and then harvested for histologic examination. Full-thickness skin biopsy specimens were obtained 24 hours after surgery and when the flaps were harvested to evaluate the viability of the apex and base of the flaps. A subjective grade was assigned to all skin biopsy specimens during histologic examination.

For all measurements, a significant difference was found between the PCO2-TC values for apices and bases of the flaps. The mean PCO2-TC for all bases was 52.66 mm of Hg ± 2.24 (SEM), and the mean PCO2-TC for all apices was 106.4 mm of Hg ± 2.44. The regional carbon dioxide index (apex PCO2-TC /base PCO2-TC ) was 2.02.

A significant difference was not found between the LPR values for bases and apices. The mean lpr for all bases was 253.23 mW ± 4.06, and the mean LPR for all apices was 243.53 mW ± 4.49.

A signficant difference was found between the histologic grades assigned to the collective bases and apices 4 days after creation of the flaps. A difference was not found between the collective bases and apices 24 hours after flap creation. On the basis of our findings, transcutaneous carbon dioxide monitoring is a useful method of evaluating skin viability in dogs.

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research