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  • Author or Editor: David J. Maggs x
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Abstract

Objective—To determine whether cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is expressed in benign or malignant canine uveal melanocytic neoplasms and whether expression correlates with malignancy.

Sample Population—Tissue sections from 71 globes; 57 with benign (n = 15), malignant (34), or mixed (8) uveal melanocytic neoplasms; 10 with nonneoplastic disease; and 4 with no abnormalities.

Procedures—Bleached sections from all globes and canine kidney were incubated with mouse monoclonal antibody directed against rat COX-2 protein or mouse antibody isotype control. Location, intensity, and percentage of immunolabeled cells were scored.

Results—Expression of COX-2 was detected in all but 5 globes, all of which contained neoplasms. Expression of COX-2 was detected in regions infiltrated by neoplasia in 21 globes; however, definitive labeling of tumor cells was detected in only 2 of those. In the remaining 19 globes, COX-2 expression was detected in areas also labeled in globes without disease and globes with nonneoplastic disease, especially the aqueous outflow tract and ciliary body. However, only globes with uveal malignant melanomas had detectable COX-2 expression in the iris. Expression of COX-2 was detected in the ciliary body of more globes with uveal malignant melanoma (20/34) than in those without disease (1/4), with nonneoplastic disease (4/10), or with melanocytoma (3/15) or mixed neoplasms (3/8).

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Canine globes with uveal melanocytic neoplasia appeared to express COX-2 in similar sites and with similar intensity as globes without neoplasia. Differentiation of benign from malignant canine uveal melanocytic neoplasms was not possible.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To characterize clinical ocular disease, viral shedding, and serologic response associated with primary canine herpesvirus-1 (CHV-1) ocular infection in naïve adult dogs.

Animals—12 specific pathogen-free adult Beagles.

Procedures—Dogs were topically inoculated in the right eye with CHV-1 (infection group; n = 8) or virus-free medium (control group; 4). Dogs were inoculated with or without corneal microtrephination and subconjunctivally administered corticosteroids. Conjunctiva, buffy coat, and serum samples for real-time PCR assay, virus isolation, and serum neutralization (SN) antibody titers were collected until postinfection day (PID) 224, and general physical and ophthalmologic examinations were performed.

Results—Dogs in the infection group developed bilateral, mild to moderate conjunctivitis that reached maximal intensity on PIDs 7 to 10. Ocular viral shedding was detected in all dogs in the infection group between PIDs 3 and 10. Infected dogs developed CHV-1 SN antibody titers, beginning at PID 7 and peaking on PID 21. All buffy coat PCR assay results were negative. Corneal microtrephination and subconjunctival corticosteroid administration did not significantly affect clinical disease or viral shedding. Following recovery from primary infection, dogs remained clinically normal, did not shed virus, and had slowly decreasing SN antibody titers. Dogs in the control group did not develop conjunctivitis, shed virus, or develop CHV-1 SN antibody titers.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Primary ocular infection of adult dogs with CHV-1 was associated with self-limiting conjunctivitis and ocular viral shedding, which was evident in the absence of clinically detectable keratitis or systemic disease. Features of this infection resembled herpes simplex virus primary ocular infection in humans.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine the effect of feline herpesvirus type 1 (FHV-1) on tear film breakup time (TFBUT) and Schirmer tear test (STT) values in cats with primary experimental infection and to determine the relationship betweenTFBUT and STT values and conjunctival goblet cell density (GCD).

Sample Population—9 specific-pathogen–free cats of approximately 6 months of age.

Procedures—6 cats were inoculated with FHV-1; 3 control cats were sham inoculated. Clinical and histologic evidence of conjunctivitis and TFBUT, GCD, and STT values were assessed at multiple times until postinoculation day (PID) 29.

Results—In infected cats, mean clinical and histologic conjunctivitis scores peaked at PID 7 and remained above baseline at PID 29. In control cats, these 2 variables did not change from baseline throughout the study. MeanTFBUT declined rapidly in infected cats up to PID 15 and at PID 29 remained less than baseline, less than for control cats, and below refer-ence range values. Mean STT value for infected cats at PID 29 was increased from baseline but was within the reference range and not different from the value for control cats. Mean GCD in infected cats declined precipitously by PID 7 and remained below reference range values at PID 29. Mean GCD in control cats remained unchanged for the duration of the study period.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—FHV-1 induced qualitative tear film abnormalities in experimentally infected cats, as measured by TFBUT and GCD. Assessment of TFBUT provided a reasonable clinical estimate of GCD.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To assess the intraoperative and postoperative clinical effects and histologic effects of intracameral administration of α-chymotrypsin in clinically normal dogs undergoing standard intracapsular lens extraction (ICLE).

Animals—6 young adult male dogs without evidence of systemic or ocular disease.

Procedures—All dogs underwent bilateral ICLE 7 minutes following injection of 75 U of α-chymotrypsin or an identical volume (0.5 mL) of a commercially available balanced saline solution (BSS) into the posterior chamber of the eye. Ease of lens extraction was subjectively assessed and intraoperative intraocular hemorrhage and fibrin accumulation scored. For 27 days after surgery, ocular hyperemia and discharge, chemosis, corneal edema, hyphema, and aqueous flare were scored, and intraocular pressure (IOP) was measured. Thirty days after surgery, histologic evidence of anterior synechia, collapse of and inflammation within the iridocorneal angle, and iritis were scored.

Results—In 5 of 6 dogs, the surgeon was able to correctly identify the eye treated with α-chymotrypsin on the basis of ease of lens extraction. Mean intraoperative intraocular hemorrhage and fibrin scores for BSS-treated eyes were significantly higher than for α-chymotrypsin-treated eyes. Postoperatively, there were no significant differences between treatments for any clinical variables, including IOP Histologic scores were not significantly different between treatments for any variable. Vision was lost as a result of glaucoma in 1 α-chymotrypsin-treated eye and 1 BSS-treated eye.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Intracameral administration of 75 U of α-chymotrypsin 7 minutes before ICLE facilitated lensectomy without apparent adverse effects in clinically normal dogs.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research