Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 4 of 4 items for :

  • Author or Editor: David E. Freeman x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All Modify Search

Abstract

Objective—To induce ischemia and reperfusion injury in the large colon mucosa of horses in vivo and evaluate the recovery and effects of components of an organ transplant solution on mucosal recovery in vitro.

Animals—6 healthy horses.

Procedures—Horses were anesthetized, and ischemia was induced for 60 minutes in the pelvic flexure, which was followed by reperfusion for 240 minutes. Ischemic (n = 4 horses), reperfused (6), and adjacent control (6) colonic mucosae were isolated for in vitro testing and histologic examinations. Tissues were mounted in Ussing chambers with plain Krebs Ringer bicarbonate (KRB), KRB with N-acetylcysteine (NAC), or KRB with a modified organ transplant solution (MOTS). Transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) and mannitol flux were used to assess mucosal integrity. Data were analyzed by use of ANOVA and Kruskal-Wallis tests.

Results—The TER in reperfused tissues was similar to the TER in control tissues and greater than the TER in ischemic tissues, which was consistent with morphological evidence of recovery in reperfused tissues. Mannitol flux was greater in ischemic tissues than in reperfused tissues. The TER and mannitol flux were not significantly affected by incubation of mucosa with NAC or MOTS.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Ischemia induced during the brief period allowed rapid mucosal repair and complete recovery of tissue barrier properties during reperfusion. Therefore, reperfusion injury was not observed for this method of ischemic damage in equine colonic mucosa.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To identify expression and localization of cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 and COX-2 in healthy and ischemic-injured left dorsal colon of horses.

Sample Population—Left dorsal colon tissue samples from 40 horses.

Procedures—Tissue samples that were used in several related studies on ischemia and reperfusion were evaluated. Samples were collected during anesthesia, before induction of ischemia, and following 1 hour of ischemia, 1 hour of ischemia and 30 minutes of reperfusion, 2 hours of ischemia, 2 hours of ischemia and 30 minutes of reperfusion, and 2 hours of ischemia and 18 hours of reperfusion. Histomorphometric analyses were performed to characterize morphological injury. Immunohistochemical analyses were performed to characterize expression and localization of COX-1 and COX-2.

Results—COX-1 and COX-2 were expressed in control tissues before ischemia was induced, predominantly in cells in the lamina propria. Ischemic injury significantly increased expression of COX-2 in epithelial cells on the colonic surface and in crypts. A similar significant increase of COX-1 expression was seen in the epithelial cells.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—On the basis of information on the role of COX-2, upregulation of COX-2 in surface epithelium and crypt cells following ischemic injury in equine colon may represent an early step in the repair process.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To evaluate the eosinophilic response in intestinal mucosa of horses with intestinal ischemia and reperfusion or with strangulation of the jejunum or colon.

SAMPLE Mucosal samples from horses with naturally occurring strangulation (n = 24 horses) or distention (n = 6) of the jejunum or colon (11), with experimentally induced ischemia and reperfusion of the jejunum (6) or colon (15), or that were euthanized for reasons other than gastrointestinal tract disease (13).

PROCEDURES Mucosal samples were collected and grouped by type of intestinal injury. Slides were stained with Luna eosinophil stain and histologically examined to determine eosinophil accumulation and distribution. Number of eosinophils per mm2 of mucosa was calculated as a measure of eosinophil accumulation. Additionally, mucosa was categorized into 5 regions; the percentage of eosinophils in each of the 5 regions, relative to the total eosinophil count in all regions, was determined.

RESULTS Eosinophil migration toward and onto the luminal surface was evident in tissues after ischemia and reperfusion and after naturally occurring strangulating disease of the jejunum and colon, as indicated by a decrease in the number of eosinophils near the muscularis mucosa and an increase in the number of eosinophils on or near the luminal surface. Ischemia alone did not change eosinophil distribution in the jejunum or colon.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Eosinophils responded to mucosal damage evoked by ischemia and reperfusion by migration toward and onto the luminal surface. This migration could represent an important component of the inflammatory response to injury in equine gastrointestinal mucosa.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objectives—To compare abomasal emptying rates in calves after suckling milk replacer or 3 common orally administered electrolyte solution components.

Animals—5 male calves < 35 days of age.

Procedures—Calves with a cannula fitted in the abomasal body were fed 2 L of milk replacer with or without parenteral administration of atropine (0.01 mg/kg, IV, then 0.02 mg/ kg, SC, q 30 min) or isotonic (150mM) solutions of sodium acetate, NaHCO3, or NaCl in a randomized crossover design. Abomasal emptying rates were determined via scintigraphy, acetaminophen absorption, ultrasonography, and change in abomasal luminal pH.

Results—Scintigraphic half-emptying time, time of maximal plasma acetaminophen concentration, ultrasonographic half-emptying time, and pH return time indicated similar abomasal emptying rates following suckling of isotonic sodium acetate, NaHCO3, and NaCl solutions, whereas the emptying rate of milk replacer was significantly slower. Mean maximal abomasal luminal pH was highest following suckling of NaHCO3 (pHmax = 7.85) and lowest following suckling of NaCl (pHmax = 4.52); sodium acetate (pHmax = 6.59) and milk replacer (pHmax = 5.84) yielded intermediate pH values.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Isotonic solutions of sodium acetate, NaHCO3, and NaCl were rapidly emptied from the abomasum but varied markedly in their ability to alkalinize the abomasum. Sodium bicarbonate–containing orally administered electrolyte solution might increase the frequency of infection or severity of clinical disease in diarrheic calves treated for dehydration by causing prolonged abomasal alkalinization.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research