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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine whether kinematic changes induced by heel pressure in horses differ from those induced by toe pressure.

Animals—10 adult Quarter Horses.

Procedure—A shoe that applied pressure on the cuneus ungulae (frog) or on the toe was used. Kinematic analyses were performed before and after 2 levels of frog pressure and after 1 level of toe pressure. Values for stride displacement and time and joint angles were determined from horses trotting on a treadmill.

Results—The first level of frog pressure caused decreases in metacarpophalangeal (fetlock) joint extension during stance and increases in head vertical movement and asymmetry. The second level of frog pressure caused these changes but also caused decreases in stride duration and carpal joint extension during stance as well as increases in relative stance duration. Toe pressure caused changes in these same variables but also caused maximum extension of the fetlock joint to occur before midstance, maximum hoof height to be closer to midswing, and forelimb protraction to increase.

Conclusion and Clinical Relevance—Decreased fetlock joint extension during stance and increased head vertical movement and asymmetry are sensitive indicators of forelimb lameness. Decreased stride duration, increased relative stance duration, and decreased carpal joint extension during stance are general but insensitive indicators of forelimb lameness. Increased forelimb protraction, hoof flight pattern with maximum hoof height near midswing, and maximum fetlock joint extension in cranial stance may be specific indicators of lameness in the toe region. Observation of forelimb movement may enable clinicians to differentiate lameness of the heel from lameness of the toe. (Am J Vet Res 2000;61:612-619)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

SUMMARY

A total of 5,142 kidney tissue samples and 5,111 serum samples from mature cattle in 49 states and Puerto Rico were collected at slaughter. Age of cattle ranged from 1 to 16 years (mean, 6.6 years). Leptospires were isolated from 88 (1.7%) kidney tissues, and 2,493 (49%) sera contained antibodies against 1 or more of 12 Leptospira interrogans serovars. Leptospires were observed by immunofluorescence in 41 (0.8%) kidney tissues. Using agglutinin-absorption tests, 73 (83%) isolates were identified as serovar hardjo, 11 (12.5%) as serovar pomona, and 4 (4.5%) as serovar grippotyphosa. By use of restriction endonuclease analysis studies of chromosomal dna, all isolates differed from reference serovars but were identical to strains previously isolated from cattle or swine in the United States. Of the serovar hardjo isolates, 85% were identical to restriction endonuclease analysis type (genotype) hardjo-bovis A and 11 (15%) were identical to genotype hardjo-bovis B. Serovar pomona isolates were identical to genotypes kennewicki A (64%) or kennewicki B (36%), and serovar grippotyphosa isolates were identical to the RM 52 strain. Isolation rates were significantly (P < 0.001) higher for beef cattle than for dairy cattle and were higher (P < 0.001) for bulls than for cows. Combined culture and immunofluorescence results indicated that 2% of mature cattle were renal carriers of leptospires.

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

SUMMARY

On the basis of serologic test results and isolation of leptospires from mature cattle, distribution and prevalence of Leptospira interrogans serovars and genotypes were compared by state and region of the United States. Relationships between isolation rate and month of sample collection, mean regional temperature, and mean regional precipitation were examined. Isolation rate and seroprevalence were significantly (P < 0.001) higher for southeastern, south central, and Pacific coastal regions than for other regions of the United States. Isolates of genotypes hardjo-bovis A and kennewicki A and B, and of serovar grippotyphosa appeared to be randomly distributed. Genotype hardjo-bovis B isolates came from a southern area of the country that extends from Georgia to New Mexico. To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first recorded isolation of serovar hardjo from Hawaii. Although significant relationship was not documented between isolation rate and month or season of the year, seroprevalence for summer, fall, and winter was significantly (P < 0.001) higher than that for spring. Regional isolation rate was related more to mean temperature (r = 0.83; P < 0.05) than to mean precipitation amount (r = 0.34; P > 0.50).

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Objective

To evaluate 2 laparoscopic techniques for castration in horses.

Design

Prospective, randomized trial.

Animals

6 sexually intact male ponies.

Procedure

Ponies were anesthetized and placed in dorsal recumbency. By means of restricted randomization, 1 testis in each pony was selected to undergo in situ destruction (ie, vascular cauterization and ligation with the testis left in situ); the other testis was pulled back into the abdomen and removed. Baseline and stimulated testosterone concentrations were determined preoperatively and postoperatively. After euthanasia, the in situ testes were examined histologically.

Results

There were no surgical complications. In all ponies, postoperative baseline and stimulated testosterone concentrations were consistent with castration. The testicular parenchyma of the testes that had been left in situ underwent coagulative necrosis.

Clinical Implications

In ponies and juvenile stallions, normally descended testes can be removed laparoscopically. Nonpalpable inguinal testes can be left in situ after laparoscopically ligating and transecting the testicular artery and vein. Additional experience with these approaches is necessary before their use can be recommended in mature stallions. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1996;209:112–114)

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To investigate continuous wavelet transformation and neural network classification of gait data for detecting forelimb lameness in horses.

Animals—12 adult horses with mild forelimb lameness.

Procedure—Position of the head and right forelimb foot, metacarpophalangeal (ie, fetlock), carpal, and elbow joints was determined by use of kinematic analysis before and after palmar digital nerve blocks. We obtained 8 recordings from horses without lameness, 8 with right forelimb lameness, and 8 with left forelimb lameness. Vertical and horizontal position of the head and vertical position of the foot, fetlock, carpal, and elbow joints were processed by continuous wavelet transformation. Feature vectors were created from the transformed signals and a neural network trained with data from 6 horses, which was then tested on the remaining 2 horses for each category until each horse was used twice for training and testing. Correct classification percentage (CCP) was calculated for each combination of gait signals tested.

Results—Wavelet-transformed vertical position of the head and right forelimb foot had greater CCP (85%) than untransformed data (21%). Adding data from the fetlock, carpal, or elbow joints did not improve CCP over that for the head and foot alone.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Wavelet transformation of gait data extracts information that is important for the detection and differentiation of forelimb lameness of horses. All of the necessary information to detect lameness and differentiate the side of lameness can be obtained by observation of vertical head movement in concert with movement of the foot of 1 forelimb. (Am J Vet Res 2003;64:1376–1381)

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate pelvic movement over a large number of strides in sound horses and in horses with induced hind limb lameness by applying methods to the pelvis that have been described for evaluating vertical head movement in horses with induced forelimb lameness.

Animals—17 adult horses.

Procedure—Horses were filmed while trotting on a treadmill before and after induction of transient mild and moderate hind limb lamenesses. Vertical pelvic movement was measured by a signal decomposition method. The vertical pelvic signal was decomposed into a periodic component (A1) that occurred at half the stride frequency (representing vertical pelvic movement caused by lameness) and another periodic component (A2) that occurred at stride frequency (representing normal vertical pelvic movement of a trotting horse). Vertical pelvic and foot positions were correlated for each stride to compare the difference between the minimum and maximum heights of the pelvis during and after stance of the right hind limb to the minimum and maximum heights of the pelvis during and after stance of the left hind limb.

Results—Maximum pelvic height difference and lameness amplitude (A1) differed significantly between sound and mild or moderate hind limb lameness conditions. Mean A1 value for vertical pelvic movement in sound horses was less than that previously reported for vertical head movement.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Pelvic height differences and signal decomposition of pelvic movement can be used to objectively evaluate hind limb lameness in horses over a large number of strides in clinical and research settings. (Am J Vet Res 2004;65: 741–747)

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine whether foals with pneumonia that were treated with erythromycin, alone or in combination with rifampin or gentamicin, had a higher risk of developing adverse effects, compared with foals treated with trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMS), penicillin G procaine (PGP), or a combination of TMS and PGP (control foals).

Design—Retrospective study.

Animals—143 foals < 240 days old.

Procedure—Information on age, sex, breed, primary drug treatment, total days of treatment with the primary drug, and whether the foal developed diarrhea, hyperthermia, or respiratory distress was obtained from the medical records. Relative risk (RR) and attributable risk (AR) were calculated to compare risk of adverse reactions between foals treated with erythromycin and control foals.

Results—Only 3 (4.3%) control foals developed diarrhea; none developed hyperthermia or respiratory distress. Foals treated with erythromycin had an 8-fold risk (RR, 8.3) of developing diarrhea, compared with control foals, and increased risks of hyperthermia (AR, 25%) and respiratory distress (AR, 15%).

Conclusion and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that use of erythromycin to treat foals with pneumonia was associated with an increased risk of diarrhea, hyperthermia, and respiratory distress, compared with use of TMS or PGP. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2000;217:68–73)

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association