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Abstract

Objective—To determine whether frontal-sinus size is associated with syringohydromyelia.

Sample Population—Medical records and magnetic resonance images of 62 small-breed dogs.

Procedures—Medical records and magnetic resonance images were reviewed retrospectively for evaluation of frontal-sinus size and syringohydromyelia. A Yates-corrected 2-tailed χ2 test was used to determine whether an association existed between absent or miniscule frontal sinuses and syringohydromyelia. The strength of the association was evaluated by means of prevalence and odds ratios.

Results—Absent or miniscule air-filled frontal sinuses were detected in 28 of 62 (45%) dogs, and syringohydromyelia was detected in 12 of 62 (19%) dogs. Syringohydromyelia was detected in 10 of 28 dogs with absent or miniscule frontal sinuses (prevalence, 36%; 95% confidence interval, 16% to 55%) and in 2 of 34 dogs with larger frontal sinuses (prevalence, 6%; confidence interval, 0% to 15%). The probability of detecting syringohy-dromyelia in dogs with absent or miniscule air-filled frontal sinuses was significantly greater than the probability of detecting it in dogs with larger frontal sinuses. The prevalence ratio was 6.1, and the odds ratio was 8.9.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—An association between frontal-sinus size and syringohydromyelia was identified in small-breed dogs, suggesting that the pathogenesis of syringohydromyelia in some instances may involve abnormal development of the entire or supratentorial part of the cranium, as opposed to being limited to the infratentorial part.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To determine the usefulness of medical infrared thermal imaging (MITI) as a screening tool for hyperthyroidism in cats, evaluate the need for hair clipping over the ventral aspect of the neck to achieve optimal images, and determine whether there is a change in thermal patterns at 1 and 3 months after radioactive sodium iodide I 131 treatment.

ANIMALS 17 cats with and 12 control cats without hyperthyroidism.

PROCEDURES All cats underwent MITI first with the hair present and then after the hair was clipped. Each cat with hyperthyroidism was subsequently appropriately treated SC with radioiodide; reevaluations, including MITI before and after hair clipping and measurement of serum thyroxine concentration, were performed 1 and 3 months after treatment.

RESULTS The MITI had 80.5% and 87.5% accuracy in differentiating hyperthyroid cats from clinically normal cats before and after the hair over the ventral aspect of the neck was clipped. Among cats with an initial serum thyroxine concentration > 4.0 μg/dL, the success rate for MITI-detected response to radioiodide treatment at the 1-month reevaluation was 92.86% in unshaved cats and 85.71% in shaved cats. The success rate for MITI-detected response to radioiodide treatment at the 3-month reevaluation was 100% in unshaved and shaved cats.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results indicated that MITI was successful in differentiating between hyperthyroid cats and clinically normal cats and identifying patients with thyroxine concentration within reference interval after radioactive sodium iodide I 131 treatment.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research