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Objective—

To investigate the relationship between pelvic muscle mass and development and expression of canine hip dysplasia (CHD).

Design—

Prospective study.

Animals—

5 Greyhounds with anatomically normal hip joints, 59 German Shepherd Dogs (23 with CHD, 24 with near-normal hip joints, and 12 with normal hip joints), and 18 German Shepherd Dog-Greyhound crossbreeds (7 with CHD, 6 with near-normal hip joints, and 5 with normal hip joints) between 12 and 47 months old in which pelvic muscle mass was evaluated. Pectineal muscle and hip joint development were evaluated in 25 German Shepherd Dogs at 8 and 16 or 24 weeks of age.

Procedures—

For evaluation of pelvic muscle mass, individual pelvic muscles were weighed and hip joints were assigned a score on the basis of severity of degenerative changes, For evaluation of pectineal muscle development, muscle sections were stained and examined.

Results—

Pelvic muscle mass was greatest in Greyhounds, intermediate in crossbred dogs, and smallest in German Shepherd Dogs. Differences in pelvic muscle mass among breeds were attributable to differences in weights of individual muscles. Hip score was negatively correlated with pelvic muscle mass and weights of selected pelvic muscles. Dogs with pectineal hypotrophy at 8 weeks of age had type-2 muscle fiber paucity or muscle fiber-type grouping at 16 or 24 weeks of age. At 8 weeks of age, hip joints were composed of multiple centers of ossification, and the acetabulum was largely cartilaginous. By 24 weeks of age, the pelvic bones were largely, although incompletely, fused.

Clinical Implications—

Diminished pelvic muscle mass in dogs with CHD and altered muscle fiber size and composition in 8-week-old dogs that subsequently develop CHD strongly suggest that abnormalities of pelvic musculature are associated with development of CHD. The complex development of the hip joint from multiple centers of ossification may make the joint susceptible to abnormal modeling forces that would result from abnormalities in pelvic muscle mass. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1997;210:1466–1473)

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Summary

Magnetic resonance imaging was used to determine the prevalence of visible pituitary masses in 21 dogs with recently diagnosed and untreated pituitary-dependent hyperadrenocorticism. All dogs had clinical signs and routine database values (CBC, serum biochemical panel, and urinalysis) consistent with a diagnosis of hyperadrenocorticism, and none had clinical signs suggestive of an intracranial mass. Each dog had plasma cortisol concentrations after adrenocorticotropic hormone administration or low-dose dexamethasone administration consistent with hyperadrenocorticism. Pituitary-dependent hyperadrenocorticism was confirmed by the finding of 2 equal-size adrenal glands on abdominal ultrasonography and by results of plasma endogenous adrenocorticotropic hormone concentration and high-dose dexamethasone suppression testing. Sagittal and transverse Tl-weighted magnetic resonance images of the brain were obtained before and after IV administration of gadopentenate dimeglumine.

Eleven dogs had visible masses, ranging in size from 4 to 12 mm at greatest vertical height. Mean age and body weight of dogs with a visible pituitary mass was not significantly different from dogs without a visible mass. There was no significant difference in endocrine test results when comparing dogs with a visible pituitary mass to dogs without. The prevalence of visible pituitary masses in dogs with pituitary-dependent hyperadrenocorticism was greater than suggested by the prevalence of clinical neurologic signs.

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Objective

To examine the clinical response to topical administration of clotrimazole in dogs with nasal aspergillosis, to compare effect of surgically placed versus nonsurgically placed catheters used for administration on outcome, and to examine whether subjective scoring of computed tomographic images can predict outcome.

Design

Retrospective case series.

Animals

60 dogs with nasal aspergillosis.

Procedure

Information including signalment, history, diagnostics, treatment method, and outcome was retrieved from medical records of dogs with nasal aspergillosis treated between 1990 and 1996 at the University of California School of Veterinary Medicine or cooperating referral practices. Final outcome was determined by telephone conversations with owners and referring veterinarians. Images obtained before treatment were subjectively assessed to develop an algorithm for predicting outcome.

Results

Clotrimazole solution (1 %) was infused during a 1-hour period via catheters surgically placed in the frontal sinus and nose (27 dogs) and via nonsurgically placed catheters in the nose (18). An additional 15 dogs received 2 to 4 infusions by either route. Topical administration of clotrimazole resulted in resolution of clinical disease in 65% of dogs after 1 treatment and 87% of dogs after one or more treatments. The scoring system correctly classified dogs with unfavorable and favorable responses 71 to 78% and 79 to 93% of the time, respectively.

Clinical Implications

Topical administration of clotrimazole, using either technique, was an effective treatment for nasal aspergillosis in dogs. Use of non-invasive intranasal infusion of clotrimazole eliminated the need for surgical trephination of frontal sinuses in many dogs and was associated with fewer complications.(J Am Vet Med Assoc 1998;213:501-506)

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine the pharmacokinetics of butorphanol tartrate after IV and IM single-dose administration in red-tailed hawks (RTHs) and great horned owls (GHOs).

Animals—6 adult RTHs and 6 adult GHOs.

Procedures—Each bird received an injection of butorphanol (0.5 mg/kg) into either the right jugular vein (IVj) or the pectoral muscles in a crossover study (1-week interval between treatments). The GHOs also later received butorphanol (0.5 mg/kg) via injection into a medial metatarsal vein (IVm). During each 24-hour postinjection period, blood samples were collected from each bird; plasma butorphanol concentrations were determined via liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

Results—2- and 1-compartment models best fit the IV and IM pharmacokinetic data, respectively, in both species. Terminal half-lives of butorphanol were 0.94 ± 0.30 hours (IVj) and 0.94 ± 0.26 hours (IM) for RTHs and 1.79 ± 1.36 hours (IVj), 1.84 ± 1.56 hours (IM), and 1.19 ± 0.34 hours (IVm) for GHOs. In GHOs, area under the curve (0 to infinity) for butorphanol after IVj or IM administration exceeded values in RTHs; GHO values after IM and IVm administration were less than those after IVj administration. Plasma butorphanol clearance was significantly more rapid in the RTHs. Bioavailability of butorphanol administered IM was 97.6 ± 33.2% (RTHs) and 88.8 ± 4.8% (GHOs).

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—In RTHs and GHOs, butorphanol was rapidly absorbed and distributed via all routes of administration; the drug's rapid terminal half-life indicated that published dosing intervals for birds may be inadequate in RTHs and GHOs.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine the body condition score (BCS) distribution for dogs examined at a teaching hospital and examine whether the BCS distribution for dogs with cancer differed significantly from the distribution for dogs without cancer.

Sample Population—1,777 dogs with cancer and 12,893 dogs without cancer.

Procedures—A retrospective prevalence case-control study was conducted that used medical records from 1999 to 2004. Information was collected on BCS (9-point system), age, breed, sex, neuter status, diagnosis, and corticosteroid administration. Body condition score at the time of examination for cancer (dogs with cancer) or first chronologic visit (dogs without cancer) was recorded. Logistic regression was used to compare BCS prevalence distributions between groups.

Results—The overall prevalence of obese dogs (BCS ≥ 7/9) was 14.8% (2,169/14,670), and the overall prevalence of overweight dogs (BCS ≥ 6/9 to < 7/9) was 21.6% (3,174/14,670). There was a significant difference in the BCS distribution between dogs with and without cancer, with a slightly lower prevalence of being overweight and obese in dogs with cancer. The prevalence of obese and overweight dogs varied with specific cancer types when compared with the prevalence for dogs without cancer.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Differences in obesity prevalence among cancer types is suggestive of an incongruous effect of this variable on cancer expression or a differential effect of specific cancer types on weight status. Systematic use of BCSs will help elucidate the association between obesity and cancer development.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

The goal of this study was to determine plasma, urine, and synovial fluid concentrations and describe the effects on biomarkers of cartilage toxicity following intra-articular dexmedetomidine administration to horses.

ANIMALS

12 research horses.

PROCEDURES

Horses received a single intra-articular administration of 1 μg/kg or 5 μg/kg dexmedetomidine or saline. Plasma, urine, and synovial fluid were collected prior to and up to 48 hours postadministration, and concentrations were determined. The effects on CS846 and C2C were determined in synovial fluid at 0, 12, and 24 hours postadministration using immunoassays.

RESULTS

Plasma concentrations of dexmedetomidine fell below the limit of quantification (LOQ) (0.005 ng/mL) by 2.5 and 8 hours postadministration of 1 and 5 μg/kg, respectively. Synovial fluid concentrations were above the LOQ (0.1 ng/mL) of the assay at 24 hours in both dose groups. Drug was not detected in urine samples at any time postdrug administration. CS846 concentrations were significantly decreased relative to baseline at 12 hours postadministration in the saline group and significantly increased in the 5-μg/kg-dose group at 24 hours. Concentrations of C2C were significantly decreased at 12 and 24 hours postadministration in the saline treatment group. There were no significant differences in CS846 or C2C concentrations between dose groups at any time.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Systemic concentrations of dexmedetomidine remained low, compared to synovial fluid concentrations. CS846, a marker of articular cartilage synthesis, increased in a dose-dependent fashion. Based on these findings, further dose titration and investigation of analgesic and adverse effects are warranted.

Open access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To evaluate effects of administration of a 4.7-mg deslorelin acetate implant on egg laying in healthy cockatiels (Nymphicus hollandicus).

ANIMALS 52 cockatiels.

PROCEDURES 26 breeding pairs (a female and its respective male in each pair) were selected on the basis of their history of egg laying. Female birds were sedated and received a 4.7-mg deslorelin acetate implant (n = 13) or placebo implant (13) in the subcutaneous tissues between the scapulae. Male and female birds of each breeding pair were placed in separate but adjacent cages. Birds were exposed to 16 hours of light and 8 hours of darkness. A nest box was placed in cages of female birds to stimulate reproductive activity. Egg production and quality were monitored daily for 365 days.

RESULTS Deslorelin acetate implants significantly suppressed egg laying in cockatiels, compared with effects for the placebo implants. Eleven of 13 placeboimplanted birds laid eggs between 12 and 42 days after implantation. None of the deslorelin-implanted birds laid eggs within 180 days after implantation, and only 5 of 13 deslorelin-implanted birds laid an egg during the study period (first egg laid between 192 and 230 days after implantation). No differences in egg quality or number of eggs per clutch were observed between the 2 groups.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Insertion of a 4.7-mg deslorelin acetate implant suppressed egg laying in healthy cockatiels for at least 180 days. Studies are necessary to evaluate effects of a deslorelin acetate implant in other avian species or in association with reproductive disorders.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To determine the pharmacokinetics and adverse effects following SC administration of ceftiofur crystalline free acid (CCFA) in New Zealand White rabbits.

ANIMALS 6 adult sexually intact female New Zealand White rabbits.

PROCEDURES Each rabbit was administered 40 mg of CCFA/kg SC. A blood sample was obtained immediately before (0 minutes), at 5 and 30 minutes after, and at 1, 1.5, 2, 3, 4, 8, 12, 24, 48, 72, 95, 120, 144, and 168 hours after administration, and plasma concentrations of ceftiofur free acid equivalents (CFAE) were measured. Pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated. For each rabbit, body weight, food consumption, fecal output, and injection site were monitored. Minimum inhibitory concentrations of ceftiofur for 293 bacterial isolates from rabbit clinical samples were determined.

RESULTS Mean ± SD peak plasma concentration of CFAE and time to maximum plasma concentration were 33.13 ± 10.15 μg/mL and 1.75 ± 0.42 hours, respectively. The mean terminal half-life of CFAE was 42.6 ± 5.2 hours. Plasma CFAE concentration was > 4 μg/mL for approximately 24 hours and > 1 μg/mL for at least 72 hours after CCFA administration. An apparently nonpainful subcutaneous nodule developed at the injection site in 3 of 6 rabbits.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results indicated that CCFA (40 mg/kg) could be administered SC every 24 to 72 hours to New Zealand White rabbits to treat infections with ceftiofur-susceptible bacteria. Single-dose administration of CCFA resulted in minimal adverse effects. Additional studies are needed to evaluate the effects of repeated CCFA administration in New Zealand White rabbits.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine the pharmacokinetics and adverse effects of maropitant citrate after IV and SC administration to New Zealand White rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus).

ANIMALS

11 sexually intact (3 males and 8 females) adult rabbits.

PROCEDURES

Each rabbit received maropitant citrate (1 mg/kg) IV or SC. Blood samples were collected at 9 (SC) or 10 (IV) time points over 48 hours. After a 2-week washout period, rabbits received maropitant by the alternate administration route. Pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated. Body weight, food and water consumption, injection site, mentation, and urine and fecal output were monitored.

RESULTS

Mean ± SD maximum concentration after SC administration was 14.4 ± 10.9 ng/mL and was detected at 1.25 ± 0.89 hours. Terminal half-life after IV and SC administration was 10.4 ± 1.6 hours and 13.1 ± 2.44 hours, respectively. Bioavailability after SC administration was 58.9 ± 13.3%. Plasma concentration at 24 hours was 2.87 ± 1.69 ng/mL after IV administration and 3.4 ± 1.2 ng/mL after SC administration. Four rabbits developed local dermal reactions at the injection site after SC injection. Increased fecal production was detected on the day of treatment and 1 day after treatment.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Plasma concentrations of rabbits 24 hours after SC and IV administration of maropitant citrate (1 mg/kg) were similar to those of dogs at 24 hours. Reactions at the SC injection site were the most common adverse effect detected. Increased fecal output may suggest an effect on gastrointestinal motility. Additional pharmacodynamic and multidose studies are needed.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To measure concentrations of trazodone and its major metabolite in plasma and urine after administration to healthy horses and concurrently assess selected physiologic and behavioral effects of the drug.

ANIMALS 11 Thoroughbred horses enrolled in a fitness training program.

PROCEDURES In a pilot investigation, 4 horses received trazodone IV (n = 2) or orally (2) to select a dose for the full study; 1 horse received a vehicle control treatment IV. For the full study, trazodone was initially administered IV (1.5 mg/kg) to 6 horses and subsequently given orally (4 mg/kg), with a 5-week washout period between treatments. Blood and urine samples were collected prior to drug administration and at multiple time points up to 48 hours afterward. Samples were analyzed for trazodone and metabolite concentrations, and pharmacokinetic parameters were determined; plasma drug concentrations following IV administration best fit a 3-compartment model. Behavioral and physiologic effects were assessed.

RESULTS After IV administration, total clearance of trazodone was 6.85 ± 2.80 mL/min/kg, volume of distribution at steady state was 1.06 ± 0.07 L/kg, and elimination half-life was 8.58 ± 1.88 hours. Terminal phase half-life was 7.11 ± 1.70 hours after oral administration. Horses had signs of aggression and excitation, tremors, and ataxia at the highest IV dose (2 mg/kg) in the pilot investigation. After IV drug administration in the full study (1.5 mg/kg), horses were ataxic and had tremors; sedation was evident after oral administration.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Administration of trazodone to horses elicited a wide range of effects. Additional study is warranted before clinical use of trazodone in horses can be recommended.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research