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Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the use of adult cat serum as an immunoglobulin supplement in kittens with failure of passive transfer.

Design—Randomized controlled study.

Animals—11 specific pathogen-free queens and their 43 kittens.

Procedure—Kittens were removed from the queens at birth, prior to suckling colostrum, and randomly assigned to 1 of 4 groups: colostrum-deprived, colostrum-fed, colostrum-deprived and administration of pooled adult cat serum IP, and colostrum-deprived and administration of pooled adult serum SC. Colostrum-fed kittens were returned to the queen and allowed to suckle normally. Colostrum-deprived kittens were isolated from the queen and fed a kitten milk replacer for 2 days to prevent absorption of colostral IgG. All colostrum-deprived kittens were returned to the queen on day 3. Serum IgG concentrations were measured by radial immunodiffusion in the kittens at birth and 2 days and 1, 2, 4, 6, and 8 weeks after birth.

Results—None of the kittens had detectable serum IgG at birth. Both IP and SC administration of adult cat serum resulted in peak serum IgG concentrations equivalent to those in kittens that suckled normally. Untreated colostrum-deprived kittens did not achieve serum IgG concentrations comparable to those for kittens in the other groups until 6 weeks of age.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that adult cat serum may be used as an immunoglobulin supplement in colostrum-deprived kittens. Although the minimum concentration of IgG necessary to protect kittens from infection is unknown, concentrations achieved were comparable to those in kittens that suckled normally. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2001;219:1401–1405)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the stability and retention of viscous formulations of the antifungal drug clotrimazole in vitro and to evaluate retention times, absorption, and histologic response to these compounds when placed in the frontal sinus of dogs.

Animals—6 male Beagles.

Procedures—1% clotrimazole gels were formulated with hydroxypropyl cellulose, poloxamer, and carboxymethylcellulose sodium bases. Commercially available 1% clotrimazole creams were also evaluated. Each compound was incubated at 37°C in a funnel. Volume retained and clotrimazole stability were evaluated for 4 weeks. Six compounds were then chosen for in vivo evaluation. The frontal sinuses of 6 dogs were filled with 1 of the 6 compounds. Computed tomographic evaluation was performed weekly for up to 4 weeks to evaluate gel retention. Blood samples were collected to evaluate clotrimazole absorption. Following euthanasia, sinuses were examined histologically.

Results—Commercially available clotrimazole creams were not retained in funnels in vitro. In vivo, hydroxypropyl cellulose– and carboxymethylcellulose-based gels resulted in the most severe inflammatory response and were retained the longest. Poloxamer-based gels had a shorter retention time and were associated with less inflammation. Clotrimazole was minimally absorbed. Despite a marked inflammatory response to several of the clotrimazole-containing gels, no notable adverse clinical responses were observed.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Poloxamer gels had the most promise for improving drug contact within the frontal sinus of dogs, while limiting the inflammatory response. Poloxamer gels have the additional benefit of improved handling as a result of reverse gelation (ie, they gel when warmed to 37°C).

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To describe concentration-over-time data for ampicillin and sulbactam in the digital and systemic circulations and synovial fluid (SYN) of cattle following a single injection of ampicillin-sulbactam as a regional IV perfusion (RIVP).

ANIMALS 6 healthy adult nonlactating Jersey-crossbred cows.

PROCEDURES The right hind limb of each cow was aseptically prepared. A tourniquet was applied around the midmetatarsal region, and 1.0 g of ampicillin with 0.5 g of sulbactam in a combined formulation was administered as an RIVP into the dorsal common digital vein (DCDV). Blood samples from the DCDV and jugular vein and SYN samples from the metatarsophalangeal joint of the prepared limb were collected immediately before and at predetermined times for 24 hours after RIVP. One blood sample was obtained from the abaxial proper plantar vein of the lateral digit of the prepared limb 0.25 hours after RIVP. Serum and SYN ampicillin and sulbactam concentrations were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography.

RESULTS Mean ± SD maximum concentration of ampicillin in SYN and serum obtained from the abaxial proper plantar and jugular veins was 1,995 ± 1,011 μg/mL, 5,422 ± 1,953 μg/mL, and 2.5 ± 1.6 μg/mL, respectively. Corresponding serum and SYN concentrations of sulbactam were lower but followed the same pattern over time as those for ampicillin. Synovial fluid ampicillin concentration remained above 8 μg/mL for a mean time of 18.9 hours.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Potentially therapeutic concentrations of ampicillin were achieved in regional serum and SYN samples; SYN concentrations remained at potentially therapeutic values for > 12 hours following RIVP of 1.5 g of ampicillin-sulbactam in the hind limb of healthy cows.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To compare the ability of acetaminophen-codeine (AC; 15.5 to 18.5 mg/kg and 1.6 to 2.0 mg/kg, respectively) or carprofen (4.2 to 4.5 mg/kg) administered PO to attenuate experimentally induced lameness in dogs.

ANIMALS

7 purpose-bred dogs.

PROCEDURES

A blinded crossover study was performed. Dogs were randomly assigned to receive AC or carprofen treatment first and then the alternate treatment a minimum of 21 days later. Synovitis was induced in 1 stifle joint during each treatment by intra-articular injection of sodium urate (SU). Ground reaction forces were assessed, and clinical lameness was scored at baseline (before lameness induction) and 3, 6, 9, 12, 24, 36, and 48 hours after SU injection. Plasma concentrations of acetaminophen, carprofen, codeine, and morphine were measured at various points. Data were compared between and within treatments by repeated-measures ANOVA.

RESULTS

During AC treatment, dogs had significantly higher lameness scores than during carprofen treatment at 3, 6, and 9 hours after SU injection. Peak vertical force and vertical impulse during AC treatment were significantly lower than values during carprofen treatment at 3, 6, and 9 hours. Plasma concentrations of carprofen (R)- and (S)-enantiomers ranged from 2.5 to 19.2 μg/mL and 4.6 to 25.0 μg/mL, respectively, over a 24-hour period. Plasma acetaminophen concentrations ranged from 0.14 to 4.6 μg/mL and codeine concentrations from 7.0 to 26.8 ng/mL, whereas plasma morphine concentrations ranged from 4.0 to 58.6 ng/mL.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Carprofen as administered was more effective than AC at attenuating SU-induced lameness in dogs.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To determine the pharmacokinetics of a single dose of meloxicam after IM and oral administration to healthy lesser flamingos (Phoeniconaias minor) by use of a population approach.

ANIMALS 16 healthy captive lesser flamingos between 1 and 4 years of age.

PROCEDURES A single dose of meloxicam (0.5 mg/kg) was administered IM to each bird, and blood samples were collected from birds at 3 (n = 13 birds), 2 (2), or 1 (1) selected point between 0 and 13 hours after administration, with samples collected from birds at each point. After a 15-day washout period, the same dose of meloxicam was administered PO via a red rubber tube and blood samples were collected as described for IM administration. Pharmacokinetic values were determined from plasma concentrations measured by high-performance liquid chromatography.

RESULTS Plasma drug concentrations after IM administration of meloxicam reached a mean ± SD maximum value of 6.01 ± 3.38 μg/mL. Mean area under the concentration-versus-time curve was 17.78 ± 2.79 μg•h/mL, and mean elimination half-life was 1.93 ± 0.32 hours. Plasma concentrations after oral administration reached a mean maximum value of 1.79 ± 0.33 μg/mL. Mean area under the curve was 22.16 ± 7.17 μg•h/mL, and mean elimination half-life was 6.05 ± 3.53 hours.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE In lesser flamingos, oral administration of meloxicam resulted in higher bioavailability and a longer elimination half-life than did IM administration, but the maximum plasma concentration was low and may be insufficient to provide analgesia in flamingos. Conversely, IM administration achieved the desired plasma concentration but would require more frequent administration.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To investigate in vitro carboplatin release from 6 carrier media.

SAMPLE 6 carboplatin-containing carrier media.

PROCEDURES An in vitro release study was performed with 6 commercially available carrier media: a hemostatic gelatin sponge, a poloxamer copolymer gel, and 2 sizes (3 and 4.8 mm in diameter) of beads molded from each of 2 commercial calcium sulfate products. All carrier media contained 10 mg of carboplatin. Carrier media specimens were placed in 37°C PBS solution for 96 hours. Carboplatin concentrations in PBS solution were measured by use of high-performance liquid chromatography at 15 time points to calculate the amount and proportion of carboplatin released from each specimen.

RESULTS Peak release of carboplatin from the poloxamer copolymer gel and hemostatic gelatin sponge were achieved after 4 and 20 hours, respectively. Maximum release did not differ significantly between the poloxamer copolymer gel and hemostatic gelatin sponge, but both released significantly more carboplatin within 96 hours than did both of the commercial calcium sulfate products. The poloxamer copolymer gel released 99% of the carboplatin, and the hemostatic gelatin sponge released 68.5% of the carboplatin. Peak release of carboplatin from the calcium sulfate beads was not reached within 96 hours.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE In this study, carboplatin release from the hemostatic gelatin sponge was incomplete. The poloxamer copolymer gel and hemostatic gelatin sponge released carboplatin rapidly in vitro, whereas calcium sulfate beads did not.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the stability of 3 extemporaneous oral suspensions of enrofloxacin mixed with readily available flavoring vehicles when stored at room temperature (approx 22°C).

Design—Evaluation study.

Samples—3 commonly compounded oral suspensions of enrofloxacin.

Procedures—On day 0, commercially available enrofloxacin tablets were compounded with a mixture of distilled water and corn syrup (formulation A) or cherry syrup (formulation B) flavoring vehicles to create suspensions with a nominal enrofloxacin concentration of 22.95 mg/mL, and 2.27% enrofloxacin injectable solution was compounded with a liquid sweetener (formulation C) to create a suspension with a nominal enrofloxacin concentration of 11.35 mg/mL. Preparations were stored in amber-colored vials at room temperature for 56 days. For each preparation, the enrofloxacin concentration was evaluated with high-performance liquid chromatography at prespecified intervals during the study. The pH, odor, and consistency for all suspensions were recorded at the start and completion of the study.

Results—Relative to the nominal enrofloxacin concentration, the enrofloxacin concentration strength ranged from 95.80% to 100.69% for formulation A, 108.44% to 111.06% for formulation B, and 100.99% to 103.28% for formulation C. A mild pH increase was detected in all 3 suspensions during the study.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results indicated that, when stored in amber-colored vials at room temperature for 56 days, the enrofloxacin concentration strength in all 3 formulations was retained within acceptance criteria of 90% to 110%. Subjectively, cherry syrup flavoring was better at masking the smell and taste of enrofloxacin than were the other mixing vehicles.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine opinions of faculty members with clinical appointments, clinical veterinarians, residents, and interns at a US veterinary teaching hospital regarding antimicrobial use and antimicrobial-resistant infections.

Design—Cross-sectional survey.

Sample—71 veterinarians.

Procedures—An online questionnaire was sent to all veterinarians with clinical service responsibilities at the North Carolina State University veterinary teaching hospital (n = 167). The survey included 23 questions regarding demographic information, educational experiences, current prescribing practices, and personal opinions related to antimicrobial selection, antimicrobial use, restrictions on antimicrobial use, and antimicrobial resistance.

Results—Of the 167 veterinarians eligible to participate, 71 (43%) responded. When respondents were asked to rate their level of concern (very concerned = 1; not concerned = 5) about antimicrobial-resistant infections, most (41/70 [59%]) assigned a score of 1, with mean score for all respondents being 1.5. Most survey participants rated their immediate colleagues (mean score, 1.9) as more concerned than other veterinary medical professionals (mean score, 2.3) and their clients (mean score, 3.4). Fifty-nine of 67 (88%) respondents felt that antimicrobials were overprescribed at the hospital, and 32 of 69 (46%) respondents felt uncomfortable prescribing at least one class of antimicrobials (eg, carbapenems or glycopeptides) because of public health concerns.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Findings indicated that veterinarians at this teaching hospital were concerned about antimicrobial resistance, thought antimicrobials were overprescribed, and supported restricting use of certain antimicrobial classes in companion animals. Findings may be useful in educating future veterinarians and altering prescribing habits and antimicrobial distribution systems in veterinary hospitals.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To assess the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of morphine in llamas.

Animals—6 healthy adult llamas.

Procedures—Llamas received morphine sulfate in a randomized crossover design. In phase 1, they received IV or IM administration of morphine at 0.05 or 0.5 mg/kg, respectively; in phase 2, they received IV administration of morphine at 0.05, 0.25, or 0.5 mg/kg. Plasma morphine and morphine-6-glucuronide concentrations were determined by validated methods. Body temperature, heart rate, respiratory rate, sedation, and analgesia were assessed and compared with plasma concentrations by regression analysis.

Results—Total body clearance was similar between IV administration of morphine sulfate at 0.25 and 0.5 mg/kg (mean ± SD, 25.3 ± 6.9 mL/min/kg and 27.3 ± 5.9 mL/min/kg, respectively), and linearity was demonstrated between these doses. Bioavailability of morphine following IM administration at 0.5 mg/kg was 120 ± 30%. Body temperature and sedation increased as the dose of morphine administered increased. Heart rate was unaffected by varying doses. Respiratory rate decreased as dose increased. Analgesia was difficult to assess as a result of high individual variability. Intravenous administration of morphine at 0.25 mg/kg provided the most consistent increase in tolerance to electric stimulation. Pharmacodynamic modeling revealed a sigmoidal relationship between plasma concentration and sedation score.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Morphine was characterized by a large apparent volume of distribution and high systemic clearance in llamas. A prolonged half-life was observed with IM injection. Intravenous administration of morphine sulfate at 0.25 mg/kg every 4 hours is suggested for further study.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To develop an easy and safe method for catheterization and determine the pharmacokinetics of a single dose of enrofloxacin after intracoelomic administration in koi.

Design—Prospective study.

Animals—20 healthy koi.

Procedure—6 koi were anesthetized with tricaine methanesulfonate, and a 23-gauge, three-fourths-inch butterfly catheter was inserted into the coelomic cavity and secured. Catheters were flushed daily for 6 days with 0.4 mL of sterile saline (0.9% NaCl) solution containing heparin (100 units of heparin in 250 mL of saline solution) without removing koi from the aquarium. At the end of the sixth day (144 hours), each of the 6 catheterized koi and 6 uncatheterized (control) koi was anesthetized individually. Enrofloxacin (10 mg/kg [4.5 mg/lb]) was administered to catheterized koi via the injection port and to control koi via a 23-gauge needle in the same site as the catheter placement. A pharmacokinetics study was performed on multiple plasma samples to validate the efficiency of the catheter. Reliability of the catheterization method was determined in 8 koi.

Results—All 6 catheters remained patent and effective for the 6 days prior to the start of the pharmacokinetics study. Results for the 2 routes of administration were comparable, and all koi survived the study without any detectable clinical problems.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—An intracoelomic catheter was effective and safe when maintained in koi for at least 6 days. This would be highly beneficial for veterinarians, clients, and fish, especially when intracoelomic administration of a drug would require daily or more frequent dosing. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2005;226: 784–788)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association