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Abstract

Objective—To determine the effect of 2 hydroxyapatite pin coatings on heat generated at the bone-pin interface and torque required for insertion of transfixation pins into cadaveric equine third metacarpal bone.

Sample Population—Third metacarpal bone pairs from 27 cadavers of adult horses.

Procedures—Peak temperature of the bone at the cis-cortex and the hardware and pin at the trans-cortex was measured during insertion of a plasma-sprayed hydroxyapatite (PSHA)—coated, biomimetic hydroxyapatite (BMHA)—coated, or uncoated large animal transfixation pin. End-insertional torque was measured for each pin. The bone-pin interface was examined grossly and histologically for damage to the bone and coating.

Results—The BMHA-coated transfixation pins had similar insertion characteristics to uncoated pins. The PSHA-coated pins had greater mean peak bone temperature at the cis-cortex and greater peak temperature at the trans-cortex (70.9 ± 6.4°C) than the uncoated pins (38.7 ± 8.4°C). The PSHA-coated pins required more insertional torque (10,380 ± 5,387.8 Nmm) than the BMHA-coated pins (5,123.3 ± 2,296.9 Nmm). Four of the PSHA-coated pins became immovable after full insertion, and 1 gross fracture occurred during insertion of this type of pin.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—The PSHA coating was not feasible for use without modification of presently available pin hardware. The BMHA-coated pins performed similarly to uncoated pins. Further testing is required in an in vivo model to determine the extent of osteointegration associated with the BMHA-coated pins in equine bone.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine synovial fluid gentamicin concentrations and evaluate adverse effects on the synovial membrane and articular cartilage of tarsocrural joints after implantation of a gentamicin-impregnated collagen sponge.

Animals—6 healthy adult mares.

Procedures—A purified bovine type I collagen sponge impregnated with 130 mg of gentamicin was implanted in the plantarolateral pouch of 1 tarsocrural joint of each horse, with the contralateral joint used as a sham-operated control joint. Gentamicin concentrations in synovial fluid and serum were determined for 120 hours after implantation by use of a fluorescence polarization immunoassay. Synovial membrane and cartilage specimens were collected 120 hours after implantation and evaluated histologically.

Results—Median peak synovial fluid gentamicin concentration of 168.9 μg/mL (range, 115.6 to 332 μg/mL) was achieved 3 hours after implantation. Synovial fluid gentamicin concentrations were < 4 μg/mL by 48 hours. Major histologic differences were not observed in the synovial membrane between control joints and joints implanted with gentamicin-impregnated sponges. Safranin-O fast green stain was not reduced in cartilage specimens obtained from treated joints, compared with those from control joints.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Implantation of a gentamicin-impregnated collagen sponge in the tarsocrural joint of horses resulted in rapid release of gentamicin, with peak concentrations > 20 times the minimum inhibitory concentration reported for common pathogens that infect horses. A rapid decrease in synovial fluid gentamicin concentrations was detected. The purified bovine type I collagen sponges did not elicit substantial inflammation in the synovial membrane or cause mechanical trauma to the articular cartilage.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To compare ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM) with standard ocular ultrasonography for detection of canine uveal cysts and to determine the sensitivity, specificity, and interobserver agreement for detection of uveal cysts with UBM.

SAMPLE 202 enucleated eyes from 101 dogs.

PROCEDURES 2 examiners examined 202 eyes by means of UBM (50 MHz) to identify uveal cysts. A board-certified radiologist then examined 98 of the 202 eyes by means of standard ocular ultrasonography (7- to 12-MHz linear transducer). Subsequently, 1 examiner dissected all 202 eyes under magnification from an operating microscope to definitively identify uveal cysts. Each examiner was masked to other examiners’ findings. Sensitivity, specificity, and interobserver agreement were calculated for detection of cysts by UBM.

RESULTS Cysts were detected by use of UBM in 55 of 202 (27%) eyes by one examiner and 29 of 202 (14%) eyes by the other. No cysts were detected in the 98 eyes examined with standard ocular ultrasonography. Dissection results revealed that cysts were present in 64 of 202 (32%) eyes, including 29 of 98 (30%) eyes examined by standard ocular ultrasonography. Mean sensitivity of UBM for cyst detection was 47%; mean specificity was 92%. Uveal cysts not identified with UBM were often small (mean diameter, 490 üm). Interobserver agreement was high (κP = 0.81).

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE UBM was more effective than standard ocular ultrasonography for detection of uveal cysts in enucleated eyes. Small-diameter cysts were difficult to visualize even with UBM.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine causes of death or reasons for euthanasia in a population of military working dogs.

Design—Retrospective study.

Animals—927 military working dogs.

Procedure—Records of all military working dogs that died during the period from 1993 to 1996 were evaluated for cause of death or reason for euthanasia by review of necropsy and histopathology reports, death certificates, and daily clinical treatment sheets. A single primary cause of death or euthanasia was determined.

Results—Although sexually intact male dogs were more numerous in the study population, castrated male dogs typically lived longer than spayed females or sexually intact males. Leading causes of death or euthanasia (76.3% of all dogs) were appendicular degenerative joint disease, neoplasia, spinal cord disease, nonspecific geriatric decline, and gastric dilatation-volvulus. Compared with German Shepherd Dogs, Belgian Shepherd Dogs were at increased risk for death attributable to neoplasia, behavior, and respiratory tract disease. German Shepherd Dogs had nearly twice the risk for death associated with spinal cord diseases, compared with Belgian Shepherd Dogs.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—For most military working dogs, death or euthanasia results from a few diseases commonly associated with advanced age. Some breed differences in risk for these diseases may exist, which clinicians should consider in the procurement and long-term management of these dogs. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2001;219:209–214)

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine incidence of and risk factors for adverse events associated with distemper and rabies vaccine administration in ferrets.

Design—Retrospective cohort study.

Animals—3,587 ferrets that received a rabies or distemper vaccine between January 1, 2002, and December 31, 2003.

Procedures—Electronic medical records were searched for possible vaccine-associated adverse events. Adverse events were classified by attending veterinarians as nonspecific vaccine reactions, allergic reactions, or anaphylaxis. Patient information that was collected included age, weight, sex, cumulative number of distemper and rabies vaccinations received, clinical signs, and treatment. The association between potential risk factors and occurrence of an adverse event was estimated with logistic regression.

Results—30 adverse events were recorded. The adverse event incidence rates for administration of rabies vaccine alone, distemper vaccine alone, and rabies and distemper vaccines together were 0.51%, 1.00%, and 0.85%, respectively. These rates were not significantly different. All adverse events occurred immediately following vaccine administration and most commonly consisted of vomiting and diarrhea (52%) or vomiting alone (31%). Age, sex, and body weight were not significantly associated with occurrence of adverse events, but adverse event incidence rate increased as the cumulative number of distemper or rabies vaccinations received increased. In multivariate logistic regression analysis, only the cumulative number of distemper vaccinations received was significantly associated with the occurrence of an adverse event.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that in ferrets, the risk of vaccine-associated adverse events was primarily associated with an increase in the number of distemper vaccinations. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2005;226:909–912)

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To establish the lowest effective dose of commercially available nanoparticulate silver (AgNP) for antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli (E coli) and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (MRSP), in vitro, and to establish the effect of incorporating AgNP into carriers for sustained release on this antibacterial activity.

SAMPLES

Silver nanoparticle dispersion (0.02 mg/mL) composed of citrate-stabilized, spherical, 10 nm diameter nanoparticles in aqueous buffer.

PROCEDURES

E coli and MRSP were treated with 0.01 mg/mL AgNP. The highest concentration of bacteria where growth was inhibited by AgNP was selected for treatment with 0.01 mg/mL AgNP incorporated 3 carriers for sustained release: calcium sulfate hemihydrate (CSH) beads, poloxamer 407 gel, and gelatin sponge, respectively. The antibacterial activity of AgNP and AgNP incorporated into carriers for sustained release was compared with a mixed linear effects model.

RESULTS

AgNP inhibited bacterial growth at a concentration of 101 for MRSP and 103 for E coli. For MRSP, the treatment group was associated with bacterial growth (P < .001) while the concentration of bacteria and time were not (P = .292 and P = .289, respectively). For E coli, the treatment group and concentration of bacteria were associated with bacterial growth (P < .001 and = .029, respectively) while time was not (P = .095). Poloxamer 407 gel exerted standalone antibacterial activity against both species of bacteria; sponge and CSH beads did not.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

AgNP has antibacterial activity against E coli and MRSP, which can be reduced when incorporated into carriers for sustained release. Poloxamer 407 gel alone and combined with AgNP exerts antibacterial activity against E coli and MRSP.

Open access

Abstract

Objective—To describe use of transurethral cystoscope–guided laser lithotripsy for fragmentation of cystic and urethral uroliths and determine procedure duration and short-term and long-term outcome in dogs.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—73 dogs with naturally occurring uroliths in the urinary bladder, urethra, or both.

Procedures—Transurethral cystoscope–guided laser lithotripsy was performed in all dogs, and medical records were reviewed for short-term and long-term outcome and complications.

Results—Laser lithotripsy resulted in complete fragmentation of all uroliths in all 28 female dogs and a majority of male dogs (39/45 [86.7%]). Dogs with urethroliths had shorter median laser time than dogs with cystic uroliths. Basket extraction and voiding urohydro-propulsion were successful for removal of the urolith fragments following laser lithotripsy. Complications related to cystoscope-guided laser lithotripsy occurred in 5 of 28 (17.9%) female dogs and 6 of 45 (13.3%) male dogs.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Transurethral cystoscope–guided laser lithotripsy was successful in female dogs and most male dogs for fragmentation of cystic and urethral uroliths. Short-term complications were most commonly related to urethral swelling and resolved with placement of an indwelling urinary catheter. There were no long-term complications.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine the incidence of vaccine-associated adverse events (VAAEs) diagnosed within 30 days of vaccination in cats and characterize risk factors for their occurrence.

Design—Retrospective cohort study.

Animals—496,189 cats vaccinated at 329 hospitals.

Procedures—Electronic records were searched for VAAEs that occurred after vaccine administration classified by practitioners as nonspecific vaccine reaction, allergic reaction, urticaria, shock, or anaphylaxis. Clinical signs and treatments were reviewed. The association between potential risk factors and a VAAE occurrence was estimated via multivariate logistic regression.

Results—2,560 VAAEs were associated with administration of 1,258,712 doses of vaccine to 496,189 cats (51.6 VAAEs/10,000 cats vaccinated). The risk of a VAAE significantly increased as the number of vaccines administered per office visit increased. Risk was greatest for cats approximately 1 year old; overall risk was greater for neutered versus sexually intact cats. Lethargy with or without fever was the most commonly diagnosed VAAE. No localized reactions recorded in the 30-day period were subsequently diagnosed as neoplasia when followed for 1 to 2 years.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Although overall VAAE rates were low, young adult neutered cats that received multiple vaccines per office visit were at the greatest risk of a VAAE within 30 days after vaccination. Veterinarians should incorporate these findings into risk communications and limit the number of vaccinations administered concurrently to cats.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To test the hypothesis that increased severity of periodontal disease in dogs is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular-related events, such as endocarditis and cardiomyopathy, as well as markers of inflammation.

Design—Historical cohort observational study.

Sample Population—59,296 dogs with a history of periodontal disease (periodontal cohort), of which 23,043 had stage 1 disease, 20,732 had stage 2 disease, and 15,521 had stage 3 disease; and an age-matched comparison group of 59,296 dogs with no history of periodontal disease (nonperiodontal cohort).

Procedures—Cox proportional hazard regression models were used to estimate the risk of cardiovascular-related diagnoses and examination findings in dogs as a function of the stage of periodontal disease (1, 2, or 3 or no periodontal disease) over time while controlling for the effect of potential confounding factors.

Results—Significant associations were detected between the severity of periodontal disease and the subsequent risk of cardiovascular-related conditions, such as endocarditis and cardiomyopathy, but not between the severity of periodontal disease and the risk of a variety of other common noncardiovascular-related conditions.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—The findings of this observational study, similar to epidemiologic studies in humans, suggested that periodontal disease was associated with cardiovascular-related conditions, such as endocarditis and cardiomyopathy. Chronic inflammation is probably an important mechanism connecting bacterial flora in the oral cavity of dogs with systemic disease. Canine health may be improved if veterinarians and pet owners place a higher priority on routine dental care.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To evaluate the effects of a single dose of orally administered gabapentin in alleviating stress at a veterinary visit in privately owned dogs.

Animals

22 healthy client-owned dogs (1.5 to 8.5 years old) were enrolled in this study.

PROCEDURES

Each dog received a 50-mg/kg oral dose of either gabapentin or placebo 2 hours before the beginning of each visit protocol. The dog’s behavioral responses were coded from recorded video clips during a 5-minute-long standardized physical examination and pre– and post–physical examination phases. The veterinary technician separately rated each greeting behavior at each visit. Physiological variables during veterinary visits (ie, eye surface temperature and salivary cortisol concentrations) were also compared between the pre– and post–physical examination phases. The owner was queried 24 hours after a visit to determine the incidence of adverse events.

RESULTS

The greeting test score, eye surface temperature, and cortisol concentrations did not differ substantially between the gabapentin and placebo treatment groups. Lip licking frequency during the physical examination phase was significantly lower in the gabapentin treatment group than in the placebo group (P = 0.001). Lip licking frequency during the pre– and post–physical examination phases was also significantly lower in the gabapentin treatment group than in the placebo treatment group (P = 0.004). No serious adverse events were reported by the owners following gabapentin treatment.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Results showed that the 50-mg/kg dose of gabapentin was well tolerated without serious adverse effects in healthy dogs. Further studies are recommended of dogs with documented stress in response to a veterinary visit.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association